Miniatures Handbook - PDF Free Download (2024)

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 1:58 PM Page 2

MINIATURES HANDBOOK Jonathan Tweet, Mike Donais, Skaff Elias, Rob Heinsoo A D D I T I O N A L

D E S I G N

A

R

T

D

Bruce R. Cordell D

E

V

E

L

O

P

E

R

S

C

O

V

Mike Donais, David Eckelberry E

D

I

T

I

R

E

C

T

O

R

Mike McVey

O

R

E

R

A

R

T

Stephen Tappin S I N T E R I O R

A R T I S T S

Charles Ryan, Jennifer Clarke Wilkes Trevor Hairsine, Des Hanley, Adrian Smith, Stephen Tappin, Richard Wright M A N A G I N G

E D I T O R

Kim Mohan G R A P H I C CORE

D&D

DESIGN

D E S I G N E R

Mari Kolkowsky

MANAGER

Ed Stark C D I R E C T O R

O F

R P G

A

R

T

O

G

R

A

P

H

E

R

Todd Gamble

R & D

Bill Slavicsek GRAPHIC PRODUCTION SPECIALIST VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLISHING

Erin Dorries

Mary Kirchoff P P R O J E C T

H

O

T

O

G

R

A

P

H

Y

M A N A G E R

Craig Gibson

Martin Durham P R O D U C T I O N

M A N A G E R

I M A G E

Chas DeLong

T E C H N I C I A N S

Travis Adams, Jason Wiley

Playtesters: Paul Barclay, Randy Buehler, Curt Gould, Worth Wollpert Based on the original DUNGEONS & DRAGONS® rules created by E. Gary Gygax and Dave Arneson and the new DUNGEONS & DRAGONS game designed by Jonathan Tweet, Monte Cook, Skip Williams, Richard Baker, and Peter Adkison. This WIZARDS OF THE COAST® game product contains no Open Game Content. No portion of this work may be reproduced in any form without written permission. To learn more about the Open Gaming License and the d20 System™ License, please visit www.wizards.com/d20.

U.S., CANADA, ASIA, PACIFIC, & LATIN AMERICA Wizards of the Coast, Inc. P.O. Box 707 Renton WA 98057-0707 Questions? 1-800-324-6496

EUROPEAN HEADQUARTERS Wizards of the Coast, Belgium T Hofveld 6d 1702 Groot-Bijgaarden Belgium

620-96582-001-EN 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 FIRST PRINTING: OCTOBER 2003

+32-70-23-32-77

DUNGEONS & DRAGONS, D&D, D20, D20 SYSTEM, DUNGEON MASTER, CHAINMAIL, FORGOTTEN REALMS, MONSTER MANUAL, WIZARDS OF THE COAST, and the Wizards of the Coast logo are trademarks of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. in the USA and other countries. Distributed to the hobby, toy, and comic trade in the United States and Canada by regional distributors. Distributed in the United States to the book trade by Holtzbrinck Publishing. Distributed in Canada to the book trade by Fenn Ltd. Distributed worldwide by Wizards of the Coast, Inc. and regional distributors. This material is protected under the copyright laws of the United States of America. Any reproduction or unauthorized use of the material or artwork contained herein is prohibited without the express written permission of Wizards of the Coast, Inc. This product is a work of fiction. Any similarity to actual people, organizations, places, or events is purely coincidental.Printed in the U.S.A. ©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc.

Visit our website at www.wizards.com/dnd

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 1:59 PM Page 3

Contents

Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Chapter 2: Magic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 The Swift Action. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Spell Notes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Spell Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Spell Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Magic Items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Chapter 3: Monsters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Abyssal Eviscerator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Aspect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Bright Naga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Catfolk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Cave Dinosaurs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Crucian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Cursed Spirit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Displacer Serpent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Equiceph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Gravehound. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Kruthik. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Hatchling Kruthik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Adult Kruthik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Greater Kruthik. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Mad Slasher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Magma Hurler . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Nothic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Phargion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Protectar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Ramadeen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Scaled Stalker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Shadow Beast. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Ghirrash . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 Khumat . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Thaskor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Spark Lasher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Stonechild . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Walking Wall. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Chapter 4: Stat Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Roleplaying Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Miniatures Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Converting to the Miniatures Rules . . . . . . . 79 Deriving Miniatures Ratings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Deriving Costs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Player Characters in the Miniatures Rules. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Chapter 6: Mass Battles Rules . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Mass Battles Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Trays. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Formed Units. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131 Unformed Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 Unit Space . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Phases . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Activating Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Formed Unit Movement. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Unformed Unit Movement . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Moving and Friendly Units . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Moving and Enemy Units . . . . . . . . . . . . 135 Charge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 136 Disengage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Attacks and Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Melee Contact . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 General Melee Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 139 Ranged Attacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Modifiers to Ranged Combat. . . . . . . . . . 140 Formed Units Making Ranged Attacks . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Damage and Casualties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Special Attack Effects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Morale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Morale Saves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 142 Morale Save Modifiers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Morale States . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Rallying. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Lone Creatures and Commanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Commanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Attached Commanders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 Commander Position. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146 Unattached Commanders. . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Difficult Units . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Commander Morale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Victory Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Terrain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Mass Battles Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 153

Chapter 7: Random Dungeons. . . . . . . . . . . 163 A Basic Random Dungeon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 163 Creating a Dungeon Delve. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 The Dungeon Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Constructing Your Deck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 164 Special Encounter Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 165 Special Cards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 167 Evolving the Dungeon Deck . . . . . . . . . . 169 The Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 169 Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 Limited-Use Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 How to Win. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Playing the Delve . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Initiative . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Encounters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Special Delve Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 171 Playing without a DM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 172 Random Dungeon Campaigns . . . . . . . . . . . 173

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Chapter 1: Characters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Favored Soul. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Healer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Marshal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Warmage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Prestige Classes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Bonded Summoner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Dragon Samurai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Havoc Mage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Skullclan Hunter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Tactical Soldier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 War Hulk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Warchief . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Feats. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Sudden Metamagic Feats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Feat Descriptions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25

Chapter 5: Skirmish Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Building a Warband . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Setup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Skirmish Basics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Movement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Attacks and Damage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Melee Attacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90 Ranged Attacks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Morale. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Spells . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 Special Abilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Terrain. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Scenarios and Variants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Random Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Warband-Building Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . 107 Team Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Challenge Skirmishes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 The Skirmish Campaign. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Magic Items. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Skirmish Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116

Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 174

NUMBERED TABLES Table 1–1: Random Starting Gold . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Table 1–2: The Favored Soul . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Table 1–3: Favored Soul Spells Known . . . . . . . . . 7 Table 1–4: The Healer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Table 1–5: The Marshal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Table 1–6: The Warmage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Table 1–7: The Bonded Summoner . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Table 1–8: The Dragon Samurai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Table 1–9: The Havoc Mage. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Table 1–10: The Skullclan Hunter . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Table 1–11: The Tactical Soldier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 Table 1–12: The War Hulk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Table 1–13: The Warchief. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Table 1–14: Feats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Table 4–1: Challenge Ratings and Encounter Levels. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Table 4–2: Combined EL Calculations . . . . . . . . 76 Table 5–1: Sample Warband . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Table 5–2: Melee Attack Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Table 5–3: Ranged Attack Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . 97 Table 5–4: Random Basic Scenarios . . . . . . . . . 103 Table 5–5: Random Warband-Building Scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Table 5–6: Random Magic Items . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Table 5–7: Magic Armor. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Table 5–8: Magic Shields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Table 5–9: Magic Weapons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Table 5–10: Potions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Table 5–11: Rings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Table 5–12: Wondrous Items . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Table 6–1: Minimum Numbers in a Unit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Table 6–2: Creatures in Formed Units . . . . . . . 132 Table 6–3: Creatures in Unformed Units. . . . . 132 Table 6–4: Combat Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Table 6–5: Morale Save Modifiers . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Table 6–6: What Commanders Can Do . . . . . . 147 Table 6–7: Special Orders . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Table 6–8: Random Mass Battles Victory Conditions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 Table 7–1: Random Dungeon Treasure. . . . . . . 171

3

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 1:59 PM Page 4

Introduction

INTRODUCTION

The DUNGEONS & DRAGONS game follows the heroic lives of individual characters, a “close-up” as it were. The Miniatures Handbook “zooms out” to follow the fortunes of elite warbands fighting one another in lethal skirmishes. Then it zooms out again to cover the fates of entire armies as they clash on the fields of battle. Copper Samurai An adventurer faces many physical and mental challenges, mostly in mundane, arcane, and supernatural combat. A commander of a warband or army, however, faces these challenges and more—directing troops to where they can do the most good, knowing which ones are dependable and which ones will flee when the going gets tough.. Whether you’re playing miniatures battles for a change of pace from your D&D campaign or incorporating battles into that campaign, you’ll find what every good warlord needs right here.

Illus. by T. Hairsine

MINIATURES HANDBOOK

This book provides new rules and material for D&D roleplaying and miniatures (both skirmishes and mass battles). Chapter 1: Characters introduces several new base classes, new prestige classes, and many new feats. While these classes and feats offer interesting new abilities for miniatures, they also provide players and the Dungeon Master (DM) with new options for both player and nonplayer characters. Most of the new classes are combat-oriented, such as the tactical soldier and the war hulk. You can expect to see members of these classes on the miniatures battlefield, but they make great additions to any D&D roleplaying campaign as well. The new feats provide an array of combat options, such as Powerful Charge, Distracting Attack, and Shieldmate. For spellcasters, this book introduces “sudden” feats that let you apply a metamagic feat to a spell without using up a higher-level slot to do so. Chapter 2: Magic details new spells, ranging from 0level to 5th level, as well as several new magic items. (Spells of higher than 5th level are too powerful for the typical miniatures battle.) Some spells are simple and straightforward, such as conviction, which grants a +2 morale bonus on saving throws. Other spells are more dramatic, such as revivify, which raises a

character from the dead without level loss—but only if you cast the spell within 1 round of the character’s death. This chapter also introduces the swift action, which is a type of action similar to casting a quickened spell. Several of the new spells have a casting time of “1 swift action.” Characters can cast spells of this type in combat without provoking attacks of opportunity or giving up their own attacks. New magic items range from the cheap and simple to the mighty. Low-level characters will appreciate the bracers of quick strike, granting one extra attack once per day. More pricey, powerful items include the cloak of thorns, which not only grants a bonus to Armor Class but damages creatures that strike the wearer in melee. Chapter 3: Monsters describes more than thirty new monsters. As with the spells in this book, most of the monsters are designed for low- to mid-level play. The bright naga, for example, has limited special abilities, making it a suitable opponent for lower-level parties (and easy for the DM to run). At the top end are the aspects, creatures spawned from tiny portions of divine energy. They resemble the deities and archfiends from which they have sprung. Chapter 4: Stat Cards shows you how to read a miniature’s information card (known as a stat card) whether you’re using the creature in skirmishes, mass battles, or in a roleplaying scenario. This chapter also includes a conversion guide to help you convert characters or creatures to the miniatures rules. Player characters can lead troops in combat, whether fastpaced skirmishes or grand battles. Chapter 5: Skirmish Rules gives complete rules for playing small-scale tactical battles with D&D creatures and characters. This chapter also includes a large array of scenarios to challenge your strategic creativity. Play headto-head, multiplayer, or in teams. You can even play campaigns, in which your warlord rises in level and your warband gains magic items. Chapter 6: Mass Battles Rules presents rules for largescale actions in which creatures fight together in large, regimented groups. Chapter 7: Random Dungeons shows you how to turn your miniatures’ stat cards into a “dungeon deck” to generate random encounters. You can use that deck to run a random dungeon as an evening’s diversion or a campaign in its own right. You don’t even need a DM! The Appendix is filled with visual aids, including terrain elements, illustrations of mass battle unit formations, and spell templates. Charge into battle with the Miniatures Handbook, and expand the possibilities for characters in your campaign.

pqqqqrs MINIATURES ON DISPLAY As you’ll soon discover (if you haven’t already), the Miniatures Handbook is lavishly illustrated. In addition to illustrations that are directly tied to the text, such as all the classes in Chapter 1 and all the monsters in Chapter 3, this book contains concept sketches and photos of dozens of miniatures from the Harbinger™ and Dragoneye™ sets.

4

The concept sketches were created to give the sculptors of the miniatures a visual reference for their work. By comparing a concept sketch to the photograph of the finished miniature, you can see how closely the sketch resembles the final result—and if you don’t already have all these miniatures in your collection, now you can literally see what you’re missing.

pqqqqrs

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 2:00 PM Page 5

Illus. by D. Hanley

hile resourceful captains lead troops into combat, fearsome warmages blast foes with fire and ice. Brave and selfless healers race into battle not to smite their foes but to keep their allies on their feet. It takes everything these combatants can do to face the raw power of war hulks, ogres, and giants trained to batter down smaller foes in great number. This chapter details new character classes and prestige classes related to battle and warfare, and offers new feats for characters of all classes.

CLASSES

The favored soul, healer, marshal, and warmage are standard classes, like the fighter and wizard classes. Favored Soul: A divine caster with an innate casting ability. Healer: A spellcaster specializing in healing magic, with other healing abilities. Marshal: A military leader who inspires the best from companions and battlemates. Warmage: A powerful battlefield spellcaster.

STARTING AGE As with any other class, you can choose a likely age or roll randomly for it. If you roll randomly, refer to the information below and use the appropriate column on Table 6–4: Random Starting Ages, page 109 of the Player’s Handbook. Favored Soul: Same as barbarian. Healer: Same as bard. Marshal: Same as cleric.

Warmage: Same as bard.

STARTING GEAR Each class has a starting package that you can use when creating a 1st-level character of that class. Alternatively, you can roll randomly for the character’s gold (see Table 1–1) and buy equipment item by item.

Table 1–1: Random Starting Gold Class Favored soul Healer Marshal Warmage

Amount (Average) 5d4×10 (125 gp) 4d4×10 (100 gp) 5d4×10 (125 gp) 3d4×10 (75 gp)

FAVORED SOUL

The favored soul follows the path of the cleric but is able to channel divine power with surprising ease. She is able to perform the same tasks as her fellow divine spellcasters but with virtually no study; to her, it comes naturally. Scholars wonder if favored souls have traces of outsider blood from unions, holy or unholy, centuries ago and generations removed. Others suggest that the ability is awakened by divine training of the proper type, or that favored souls are simply imbued with their gifts by their gods when they begin training as clerics. In any case, favored souls cast their spells naturally, as much through force of personality as through study.

5

Illus. by T. Hairsine

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 2:00 PM Page 6

Adventures: Favored souls are often loners, wandering the land serving their deities. They are welcomed by their churches but treated as unusual and sometimes misunderstood. They are emissaries of their deities, outside the church’s command structure—respected mystics not requiring the support normally crucial to a priest’s success. This status makes them sometimes revered and sometimes envied by their cleric cousins. While favored souls are occasionally disrespected for their perceived lack of discipline, devout worshipers know that they are a powerful message from, and indeed a living manifestation of, their gods. Characteristics: Favored souls cast divine spells by means of an innate connection rather than through laborious training and prayer. Their divine connection is natural rather than learned. They know fewer spells than clerics do and acquire powerful spells more slowly than clerics, but they can cast spells more often than clerics can, and they have no need to select and prepare them ahead of time. Alignment: Divine magic is intuitive to a favored soul, not a matter of careful prayer. This intuitive nature leads to a freer interpretation of faith and doctrine, and so favored souls tend slightly toward chaos over law. A favored soul is often of the same alignment as her deity, though some are one step away. For example, a favored soul could serve a lawful good deity and be neutral good herself. A favored soul may not be neutral unless her deity is neutral. Religion: A favored soul can be of any religion. The most common deity worshiped by human favored souls in civilized lands is Pelor, god of the sun. Among nonhuman races,

favored souls most commonly worship the chief deity of their racial pantheon. Unlike clerics, favored souls are not able to devote themselves to a cause or a source of divine power instead of a deity. Background: Favored souls learn of their connection with the divine at a young age. Eventually, a young favored soul understands the power that she has been wielding unintentionally. Favored souls, as naturally inclined divine channelers, are also born loners. Unlike clerics in a temple, they gain little by sharing their knowledge and have no strong incentive to work together. Races: The innate talent of spontaneously channeling divine power is unpredictable, and it can show up in any of the common races. Divine spellcasters from savage lands or from among the brutal humanoids are more often favored souls than clerics. Other Classes: Favored souls have the most in common with members of other selfA favored soul taught classes, especially sorcerers, but also druids and rogues. They sometimes find themselves at odds with members of the more disciplined classes, specifically clerics, whom they sometimes view as too wrapped up in doctrine and rigidly defined attitudes. Role: The favored soul serves as a group’s backup healer and defensive specialist. She can hold her own in a fight, especially if she chooses to specialize in powers that aid her in combat.

GAME RULE INFORMATION Favored souls have the following game statistics. Abilities: Charisma determines how many spells the favored soul can cast per day. Wisdom determines how hard the favored soul’s spells are to resist (see Spells, below). In addition to using

Table 1–2: The Favored Soul

6

Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th

Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +9/+4 +10/+5 +11/+6/+1 +12/+7/+2 +12/+7/+2 +13/+8/+3 +14/+9/+4 +15/+10/+5

Fort Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Ref Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Special — — Deity’s weapon focus — Energy resistance (1st type) — — — — Energy resistance (2nd type) — Deity’s weapon specialization — — Energy resistance (3rd type) — Wings — — Damage reduction

0 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

—————— Spells per Day —————— 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 3 — — — — — — — — 4 — — — — — — — — 5 — — — — — — — — 6 3 — — — — — — — 6 4 — — — — — — — 6 5 3 — — — — — — 6 6 4 — — — — — — 6 6 5 3 — — — — — 6 6 6 4 — — — — — 6 6 6 5 3 — — — — 6 6 6 6 4 — — — — 6 6 6 6 5 3 — — — 6 6 6 6 6 4 — — — 6 6 6 6 6 5 3 — — 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 — — 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 3 — 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 — 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 3 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 2:00 PM Page 7

Charisma and Wisdom for spellcasting, a favored soul also benefits from high Dexterity, Strength, and Constitution scores. Alignment: Any. Hit Die: d8.

Class Skills

0 4 5 5 6 6 7 7 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 9

——————— Spells Known ——————— 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 3 — — — — — — — 3 — — — — — — — 4 — — — — — — — 4 3 — — — — — — 5 3 — — — — — — 5 4 3 — — — — — 6 4 3 — — — — — 6 5 4 3 — — — — 6 5 4 3 — — — — 6 6 5 4 3 — — — 6 6 5 4 3 — — — 6 6 6 5 4 3 — — 6 6 6 5 4 3 — — 6 6 6 6 5 4 3 — 6 6 6 6 5 4 3 — 6 6 6 6 6 5 4 3 6 6 6 6 6 5 4 3 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 5

9th — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 3 3 4

Class Features All of the following are class features of the favored soul. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Favored souls are proficient with all simple weapons, with light and medium armor, and with shields (except tower shields). A favored soul is also proficient with her deity’s

Halfling Outrider

Illus. by D. Hanley

Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th

CHAPTER 1:

Table 1–3: Favored Soul Spells Known

CHARACTERS

The favored soul’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Heal (Wis), Jump (Str), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), and Spellcraft (Int). Skill Points at 1st Level: (2 + Int modifier) × 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + Int modifier.

favored weapon. Although a favored soul is not proficient with heavy armor, wearing it does not interfere with her spellcasting. Spells: A favored soul casts divine spells (the same type of spells available to clerics), which are drawn from the cleric spell list. She can cast any spell she knows without preparing it ahead of time the way a cleric must. To cast a spell, a favored soul must have a Charisma score of 10 + the spell’s level (Cha 10 for 0-level spells, Cha 11 for 1st-level spells, and so forth). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a favored soul’s spell is 10 + the spell’s level + the favored soul’s Wisdom modifier. Like other spellcasters, a favored soul can cast only a certain number of spells of each spell level per day. Her base daily spell allotment is given on Table 1–2: The Favored Soul. In addition, she receives bonus spells per day if she has a high Charisma score (see Table 1–1, page 8 of the Player’s Handbook). Unlike that of a cleric, a favored soul’s selection of spells is limited. A favored soul begins play knowing four 0-level spells and three 1st-level spells of her choice. At each new favored soul level, she gains one or more new spells, as indicated on Table 1–3: Favored Soul Spells Known. (Unlike spells per day, the number of spells a favored soul knows is not affected by her Charisma score; the numbers on Table 1–3 are fixed.) Upon reaching 4th level, and at every even-numbered favored soul level after that (6th, 8th, and so on), a favored soul can choose to learn a new spell in place of one she already knows. In effect, the favored soul “loses” the old spell in exchange for the new one. The new spell’s level must be the same as that of the spell being exchanged, and it must be at least two levels lower than the highest-level favored soul spell the character can cast. A favored soul may swap only a single spell at any given level, and must choose whether or not to swap the spell at the same time that she gains new spells known for the level. Unlike a cleric, a favored soul need not prepare her spells in advance. She can cast any spell she knows at any time, assuming she has not yet used up her spells per day for that spell level. Deity’s Weapon Focus: At 3rd level, a favored soul gains the Weapon Focus feat with her deity’s favored weapon. If the character already has that feat, she can choose a different one. Energy Resistance (Ex): At 5th level, a favored soul chooses an energy type and gains resistance 10 against that type. At 10th level and 15th level, the character gains resistance 10 against two other energy types of her choosing. Deity’s Weapon Specialization: At 12th level, a favored soul gains the Weapon Specialization feat with her deity’s favored weapon. If she already has that feat, she can choose a different one. Wings (Ex): At 17th level, a favored soul gains wings and can fly at a speed of 60 feet (good maneuverability). A good-aligned favored soul grows feathered wings, and an evil-aligned favored soul gains batlike wings. A favored soul who is neither good nor evil may choose either type of wings. Damage Reduction (Su): A 20thlevel favored soul gains damage reduction. If the character is lawful-aligned, the damage reduction is 10/silver. If the character is chaotic-aligned, the damage reduction is 10/cold iron. A favored soul who is neither lawful nor chaotic may choose either type of damage reduction.

7

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 2:01 PM Page 8

Human Favored Soul Starting Package

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

Armor: Scale mail (+4 AC, armor check penalty –4, speed 20 ft., 30 lb.). Heavy wooden shield (+2 AC, armor check penalty –2, 10 lb.). Weapons: Heavy mace (1d8, crit ×2, 8 lb., one-handed, bludgeoning). Light crossbow (1d8, crit 19–20/×2, range inc. 80 ft., 4 lb., piercing). Skill Selection: Pick a number of skills equal to 3 + Int modifier.

Illus. by T. Hairsine

Skill Spellcraft Concentration Diplomacy Knowledge (arcana) Intimidate (cc) Listen (cc) Spot (cc) Survival (cc)

8

Ranks 4 4 4 4 2 2 2 2

Ability Int Con Cha Int Cha Wis Wis Wis

Armor Check Penalty — — — — — — — —

Feat: Combat Casting. Bonus Feat: Toughness. Deity: Pelor. Spells Known: 0—detect magic, cure minor wounds, light, read magic; 1st—bless, command, cure light wounds. Gear: Backpack with waterskin, one day’s trail rations, bedroll, sack, and flint and steel. Case with 10 crossbow bolts. Wooden holy symbol (sun disc of Pelor). Hooded lantern, 5 pints of oil. Gold: 2d4 gp.

HEALER

The hurts of the world are manifold. Minor accidents are common, and usually easily dealt with. However, when conflict and allout warfare occur, they leave misery and hurt in their wake that can stagger the imagination. While good-aligned clerics are called upon to heal, their complex obligations and abilities often get in the way of pure solace and remediation. Not so the healer. One of the healer’s great purposes in life is to provide protection, and failing that, healing, to all good people who require her aid. Empathetic, a healer is adept both at detecting the ailments of allies and understanding the coarse, unruly thoughts of beasts. Her way with animals wins her friends among otherwise savage creatures of the wild. Adventures: The healer provides aid to members of her adventuring company, the soldiers of her religion, or the alliance to which she is pledged. When a battlefield is strewn with wounded allies or an expedition team’s members are sorely hurt, a healer cures the injuries of the faithful and those who have allied themselves with the side of good. A healer might accept a commission to escort a company

or warband on a dangerous mission, making herself available to cast divine protections and offer divine healing. The healer is much revered for her services, and she may ask her companions for daily praise to her deity—or at least an equal share in any reward garnered after the successful conclusion of the adventure or military action. Characteristics: Healers are masters of curative magic, outpacing even clerics in this regard. This focus on healing comes with a trade-off: A healer’s spell list is sharply constrained, and it lacks destructive magic and violent spells. Healers have some combat capability and are familiar with basic weapons and some armor. Alignment: Dedicating one’s life to curative magic requires a good alignment. Religion: Healers revere good-aligned deities or righteous causes. Background: Some healers are unofficially attached members of religious organizations. Others wander the lands freely, either alone or in adventuring companies. Many also take up service in armies that combat evil, repel invasions, or otherwise “fight the good fight.” Healing all allies—no matter their philosophy—while at the same time eschewing the use of violent spells requires a selfless quality and dedication to good. A healer must be gentle, but also strong in her convictions. Races: The need for healing A healer knows no racial boundaries, and healers include members of all the common races. Adventuring healers are most often humans and elves. Healers are less common among the dwarves,who would rather prevent wounds (by smashing the enemy) than cure them. Other Classes: The healer is rarely snubbed in an adventuring company. All realize that her presence could be the advantage that enables them to see their next quest through to the end. Healers sometimes clash with clerics, since clerics represent a more dogmatic view of faith and reverence toward the deities. Role: A healer is easy to spot. She moves about behind an adventuring company or combat unit, applying her divine skills to bring relief to the injured. After she passes, the wounded press forward with renewed vigor, and the fallen may yet rise again.

GAME RULE INFORMATION Healers have the following game statistics. Abilities: Wisdom determines how many spells a healer can cast per day. Charisma determines how effective the healer’s spells are. A high Constitution improves her hit points, allowing her to brave combat and letting her spend fewer healing spells on herself. Alignment: Any good. Hit Die: d8.

Class Skills The healer’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Heal (Wis), Knowledge (nature) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Profession (Wis), Sense Motive (Wis), Spellcraft (Int), and Survival (Wis).

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 2:01 PM Page 9

Skill Points at 1st Level: (4 + Int modifier) × 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Int modifier.

Class Features

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

All of the following are class features of the healer. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Healers are proficient with all simple weapons and with light armor. Additionally, a healer who uses metal armor or any kind of shield is severely hampered. The armor of a healer is restricted by traditional oaths, not simply training. A healer knows how to wear light metal armor and could become proficient with medium or heavy armor, but wearing metal armor or bearing a shield would violate her oath and suppress her healer powers. Her ethos requires a certain vulnerability that allows her to more fully empathize with those in their care. A healer who uses prohibited armor is unable to cast healer spells or use any of her supernatural or spell-like class features while doing so and for 24 hours after the armor is taken off. Spells: A healer casts divine spells (the same type of spells available to clerics), which are drawn from the healer spell list given below. A healer must choose and prepare her spells in advance (see below). To prepare or cast a spell, a healer must have a Wisdom score of 10 + the spell’s level (Wis 10 for 0-level spells, Wis 11 for 1stlevel spells, and so forth). The Difficulty Class for a saving throw against a healer’s spell is 10 + the spell’s level + the healer’s Charisma modifier. Like other spellcasters, a healer can cast only a certain number of spells of each spell level per day. Her base daily spell allotment is given on Table 1–4: The Healer. In addition, she receives bonus spells per day if she has a high Wisdom score (see Table 1–1, page 8 of the Player’s Handbook). Healers do not acquire their spells from books or scrolls, nor do they prepare them through study. Instead, they meditate or pray for their spells, receiving them through their own strength of faith. Each healer must choose a time at which she must spend 1 hour each day in quiet contemplation or supplication to regain her daily allotment of spells. Time spent resting has no effect on whether a healer can prepare spells. A healer may prepare and cast any spell on the healer spell list (see below), provided she can cast spells of that level, but she must choose which spells to prepare during her daily meditation.

Healing Hands (Ex): Whenever a healer casts a spell that cures hit point damage, she adds her Charisma modifier to the amount of damage healed. For instance, if a 5th-level healer with an 18 Charisma casts cure light wounds, she cures 1d8+5 points of damage normally, plus an additional 4 points of damage due to her Charisma bonus. This bonus applies only to spells of the healing subschool that she casts as a healer, not to those that she may have by virtue of levels in another class. Skill Focus (Heal): A healer’s focused training grants her this bonus feat at 2nd level. If she already has that feat, she may choose a different one. Cleanse Paralysis (Su): A healer deals with certain kinds of maladies so often that eventually she can cure them without resorting to a spell. At 3rd level, a healer gains the ability to cleanse paralysis once per day, as if casting a remove paralysis spell. Cleanse Disease (Su): At 4th level, a healer gains the ability to cleanse disease once per day, as if casting a remove disease spell. Cleanse Fear (Su): At 5th level, a healer gains the ability to cleanse fear once per day, as if casting a remove fear spell. Cleanse Poison (Su): At 6th level, a healer gains the ability to cleanse poison once per day, as if casting a neutralize poison spell. Effortless Healing (Ex): At 7th level, a healer has learned to cast spells of the healing subschool with minimal effort. She may cast such spells without provoking attacks of opportunity. This ability applies only to spells of the healing subschool that she casts as a healer, not to those that she may have by virtue of levels in another class. Unicorn Companion (Ex): When a healer attains 8th level, the deities recognize her devotion and grant her a celestial unicorn companion as her mount and aide. The unicorn, a symbol of healing and purity, serves the healer willingly and unswervingly. Once per day, as a full-round action, the healer may magically call her companion from the celestial realms in which it resides. The companion immediately appears adjacent to the healer and remains for 2 hours per healer level. It may be dismissed at any time as a free action. The companion is the same creature each time it is called, though the healer may release a particular companion from service to gain a companion of a different kind. Each time the companion is called, it appears in full health, regardless of any damage it may have taken previously. The companion also appears wearing or carrying any gear it had

Table 1–4: The Healer Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th

Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6/+1 +6/+1 +7/+2 +7/+2 +8/+3 +8/+3 +9/+4 +9/+4 +10/+5

Fort Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6

Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Special Healing hands Skill Focus (Heal) Cleanse paralysis Cleanse disease Cleanse fear Cleanse poison Effortless healing Unicorn companion Cleanse blindness Cleanse spirit — — Cleanse petrification — New limb — — — — New life

0 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

—————— Spells per Day —————— 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 3 — — — — — — — — 4 — — — — — — — — 4 3 — — — — — — — 4 4 — — — — — — — 5 4 3 — — — — — — 5 4 4 — — — — — — 5 5 4 3 — — — — — 5 5 4 4 — — — — — 6 5 5 4 3 — — — — 6 5 5 4 4 — — — — 6 6 5 5 4 3 — — — 6 6 5 5 4 4 — — — 6 6 6 5 5 4 3 — — 6 6 6 5 5 4 4 — — 6 6 6 6 5 5 4 3 — 6 6 6 6 5 5 4 4 — 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 4 3 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 4 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 4 6 6 6 6 6 6 5 5 4

9

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 2:01 PM Page 10

when it was last dismissed. Calling a companion is a conjuration (calling) effect. A healer of 12th level or higher may select from alternative lists of companions (see the sidebar). Should she select a companion from one of these alternative lists, the creature gains abilities as if the character’s healer level were lower than it

actually is. Subtract the value indicated in the appropriate list header from the character’s healer level and compare the result with the healer level entry on the table in the sidebar to determine the companion’s powers. (If this adjustment would reduce the healer’s effective level to 0 or lower, she can’t have that creature as a companion.) For example, a 12th-level healer

pqqqqrs

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

THE HEALER’S COMPANION The healer’s companion is different from a normal creature of its kind in many ways. The standard companion for a healer is a celestial unicorn. It is superior to a normal celestial unicorn and has special powers, as described below. Healer Bonus Natural Str/Dex/Int Level HD Armor Adj. Adj. Special 8th–11th +0 +0 +0 Empathic link, improved evasion, share saving throws, share spells 12th–14th +2 +2 +2 15th–17th +4 +4 +2 Devotion 18th–20th +6 +6 +2 Improved speed, spell resistance Healer’s Companion Basics: Use the base statistics for a creature of the companion’s kind, as given below or in the Monster Manual, but make the following changes: Healer Level: The character’s healer level, which has a direct effect on the extent of the companion’s special powers. Bonus HD: Extra eight-sided (d8) Hit Dice, each of which gains a Constitution modifier, as normal. Bonus Hit Dice improve the companion’s base attack and base save bonuses. A companion’s base attack bonus is the same as that of a cleric of a level equal to the companion’s HD. A companion has good Fortitude and Reflex saves (treat it as a character whose level equals the creature’s HD). The companion gains extra skill points and feats for bonus HD as normal for advancing a monster’s Hit Dice (see the Monster Manual). Natural Armor Adj.: The number noted here is an improvement to the creature’s existing natural armor bonus. It represents the preternatural toughness of a healer’s companion. Str/Dex/Int Adj.: Add this figure to the companion’s Strength, Dexterity, and Intelligence scores. Empathic Link (Su): The healer has an empathic link with her companion out to a distance of up to 1 mile. The healer cannot see through the companion’s eyes, but they can communicate empathically. Note that unicorns see the world differently from humans, so misunderstandings are always possible. Because of this empathic link, the healer has the same connection to an item or place that her companion does, just as with a master and his familiar (see the Familiars sidebar, page 52 of the Player’s Handbook). Improved Evasion (Ex): When subjected to an attack that normally allows a Reflex save for half damage, a companion takes no damage if it makes a successful saving throw and half damage even if the saving throw fails. Share Saving Throws: For each of its saving throws, the companion uses its own base save bonus or the healer’s, whichever is higher. The companion applies its own ability modifiers to saves, and it doesn’t share any other bonuses on saves that the healer might have (such as from magic items or feats). Share Spells: At the healer’s option, she may have any spell (but not any spell-like ability) she casts on herself also affect her companion. The companion must be within 5 feet at the time of casting to receive the benefit. If the spell or effect has a duration other than instantaneous, it stops affecting the companion if the creature moves farther

than 5 feet away and will not affect the companion again even if it returns to the healer before the duration expires. Additionally, the healer may cast a spell with a target of “You” on her companion (as a touch range spell) instead of on herself. A healer and her companion can share spells even if the spells normally do not affect creatures of the companion’s type (magical beast). Devotion (Ex): A companion’s devotion to its master is so complete that it gains a +4 morale bonus on Will saves against enchantment spells and effects. Improved Speed (Ex): The companion’s base ground speed increases by 10 feet. Spell Resistance (Su): A companion’s spell resistance equals its master’s healer level + 5.

ALTERNATIVE CELESTIAL COMPANIONS A healer of sufficiently high level can select her celestial companion from the following list. Apply the indicated adjustment to the healer’s level for purposes of determining the companion’s characteristics and special abilities. For example, if a 14th-level healer takes a gynosphinx as a companion, the gynosphinx’s special abilities are determined as if the healer were 10th level instead of 14th (due to the –4 adjustment). These companions are symbols of healing in various cultures. 12th Level or Higher (Level –4) Lammasu Gynosphinx Water naga1 16th Level or Higher (Level –8) Androsphinx Couatl 1 Available only in an aquatic environment.

SAMPLE UNICORN COMPANION The statistics below are for a celestial unicorn. The statistics do not include the modifications for being a companion as given on the table above. Celestial Unicorn: CR 4; Large magical beast; HD 4d10+20; hp 42; Init +3; Spd 60 ft.; AC 18, touch 12, flat-footed 15; Base Atk +4; Grp +13; Atk +11 melee (1d8+8, horn); Full Atk +11 melee (1d8+8, horn) and +3 melee (1d4+2, 2 hooves); SA smite evil +4 1/day; SQ damage reduction 5/magic, darkvision 60 ft., immunity to poison, charm, and compulsion, low-light vision, magic circle against evil, resistance to acid 5, cold 5, electricity 5, scent, spell-like abilities, spell resistance 9, wild empathy; AL CG; SV Fort +9, Ref +7, Will +6; Str 20, Dex 17, Con 21, Int 10, Wis 21, Cha 24. Skills and Feats: Jump +21, Listen +11, Move Silently +9, Spot +11, Survival +8; Alertness, Skill Focus (Survival). Spell-Like Abilities: At will—detect evil as a free action; 3/day— cure light wounds (caster level 5th); 1/day—cure moderate wounds (caster level 5th), neutralize poison (caster level 8th), greater teleport within the boundaries of its home forest.

pqqqqrs

10

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:07 PM Page 11

A healer who grossly violates her ethos (such as by refusing to heal an ally or a good-aligned creature) loses all spells and class features (except for proficiency with simple weapons and light armor). She cannot thereafter gain levels as a healer until she atones (see the atonement spell description, page 201 of the Player’s Handbook).

Healer Spell List Healers choose their spells from the following list. 0 Level: create water, cure minor wounds, deathwatch, detect magic, detect poison, light, mending, purify food and drink, read magic. 1st Level: bless water, cure light wounds, goodberry, protection from evil, remove fear, remove paralysis, sanctuary, speak with animals. 2nd Level: calm emotions, cure moderate wounds, delay poison, gentle repose, remove blindness/deafness, remove disease, lesser restoration. 3rd Level: close wounds*, create food and water, cure serious wounds, neutralize poison, remove curse, restoration, status. 4th Level: cure critical wounds, death ward, freedom of movement, mass cure light wounds, panacea*. 5th Level: atonement, break enchantment, mass cure moderate wounds, raise dead, revivify*, stone to flesh, true seeing. 6th Level: greater restoration, heal, heroes’ feast, mass cure serious wounds, regenerate. 7th Level: mass cure critical wounds, repulsion, resurrection. 8th Level: discern location, holy aura, mass heal. 9th Level: foresight, gate, true resurrection. * New spell described in Chapter 2 of this book.

Human Healer Starting Package Armor: Leather (+2 AC, speed 30 ft., 15 lb.). Weapons: Longspear (1d8, crit ×3, 9 lb., two-handed, piercing). Light crossbow (1d8, crit 19–20/×2, range inc. 80 ft., 4 lb., piercing). Skill Selection: Pick a number of skills equal to 5 + Int modifier.

Ranks 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2

Ability Con Wis Cha Wis Cha Wis Int Wis Int

Armor Check Penalty — — — — — — — — —

Feat: Scribe Scroll. Bonus Feat: Toughness. Deity: Pelor. Gear: Backpack with waterskin, one day’s trail rations, bedroll, sack, and flint and steel. Case with 10 crossbow bolts. Scroll of cure light wounds. Wooden holy symbol. Bullseye lantern, 5 pints of oil. Gold: 2d4 gp.

CHARACTERS

Ex-Healers

Skill Concentration Heal Diplomacy Sense Motive Handle Animal Survival Craft Listen (cc) Search (cc)

CHAPTER 1:

could select a lammasu as a companion. The lammasu would have characteristics and special abilities as if the healer were 8th level (taking into account the –4 adjustment) instead of 12th level. Should the healer’s companion die, it immediately disappears, leaving behind any equipment it was carrying. The healer may not call another companion for 30 days or until she gains a healer level, whichever comes first, even if the companion is somehow returned from the dead. During this 30-day period, the healer is distraught and takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls and weapon damage rolls. Cleanse Blindness (Su): At 9th level, a healer gains the ability to cleanse blindness once per day, as if casting a remove blindness/deafness spell. Cleanse Spirit (Su): At 10th level, a healer gains the ability to restore a creature to health once per day, as if casting a greater restoration spell. Cleanse Petrification (Su): At 13th level, a healer gains the ability to restore a petrified creature to health once per day, as if casting a stone to flesh spell. New Limb (Su): At 15th level, a healer gains the ability to regrow a creature’s lost or damaged body part once per day, as if casting a regenerate spell. New Life (Su): Once per week, a 20th-level healer can bring a dead creature back to life, as if casting a true resurrection spell.

MARSHAL

Sometimes it is not enough to be a conquering warrior, a champion of all that’s right, an experienced sellsword, or an elite foot soldier. Sometimes the circ*mstances require a solid commander of soldiers and situations. Sometimes the circ*mstances demand a marshal. Marshals inspire trust in those they lead. They earn that trust by slogging through harsh landscapes, dangerous battlefields, and haunted catacombs along with those under their command. With a look, they can see where to best deploy their resources or come up with a sneaky ruse to fool their enemies. A marshal has a tactician’s mind, a cartographer’s overview of the disputed landscape (or dungeon warren), and a way with words that can inspire battle-hardened fighters to give it their all when melee breaks out. Adventures: Whether leading troops or a company of adventurers, marshals accept commissions in return for their service. Once a commission is accepted, most marshals feel honorbound to see the contract through to its end. If the choice is between honoring the commission and the survival of his company, though, many a marshal will break the commission and lead his forces to a new patron in distant lands. Characteristics: Trained in the basics of fighting, marshals possess a general knowledge of weapons and armor. Their real strength is their ability to lead those who follow them to success they might not otherwise reach in combat. Marshals make passable warriors themselves, when personal danger finds them. Alignment: Marshals may be of any alignment. Good-aligned marshals are often crusading leaders who seek out and fight evil. Lawful-aligned marshals accept commissions from people who face invasion by foreign aggressors. Chaotic-aligned marshals lead mercenaries to wherever the pay is best. Evil-aligned marshals tend to lead forces of foreign aggressors set on invasion and plunder. Religion: Marshals often worship Heironeous (god of valor) or Kord (god of strength). Some worship St. Cuthbert (god of retribution), Hextor (god of tyranny), or Erythnul (god of slaughter). Background: Marshals come to their profession through study and desire. Most have had formal training in a noble’s army, where they were given positions of authority. Others have trained in formal academies, preparing themselves for careers as a military officers. Marshals see others of their class as part of

11

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:07 PM Page 12

Table 1–5: The Marshal

Illus. by D. Hanley

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th

Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6/+1 +6/+1 +7/+2 +8/+3 +9/+4 +9/+4 +10/+5 +11/+6/+1 +12/+7/+2 +12/+7/+2 +13/+8/+3 +14/+9/+4 +15/+10/+5

Fort Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6

Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Special Skill Focus (Diplomacy), minor aura Major aura +1 — Grant move action 1/day — — Major aura +2 Grant move action 2/day — — — Grant move action 3/day — Major aura +3 — Grant move action 4/day — — — Grant move action 5/day, major aura +4

a special group, especially those they have studied with. Even enemy marshals can be afforded some respect, though the enemy’s forces must be crushed all the same. Races: Human marshals often follow in the footsteps of their parents, who served as officers in earlier wars, conflicts, or mercenary companies. Dwarf marshals are trained to lead strike teams that protect the underground dwarven kingdoms. Elf marshals rarely enroll in military academies, though half-elves often do. Half-orc marshals fight an uphill battle in trying to garner respect in mixed-race units. Among the brutal humanoids, few manage to enroll in the academies where the elite skills of command are taught. Other Classes: The marshal relies on the other classes in all ways—it is his job to support a team, magnifying the strengths of each member for success in battles or forays into dangerous cavern complexes. Role: In most adventuring parties, the marshal serves as the lead tactician, while his comrades support him with spells, ranged attacks, and other effects. However, once a plan is in motion, most marshals enter the melee to assure victory.

GAME RULE INFORMATION

A marshal

Marshals have the following game statistics. Abilities: Charisma is especially important for marshals because it improves their standing with those they lead, as well as permitting them to magnify the efforts of the group. Constitution is important for a marshal’s staying power. Intelligence is important for the many skills required by marshals to complete their commissions. Alignment: Any. Hit Die: d8.

12

Auras Known Minor Major 1 0 1 1 2 1 2 1 3 2 3 2 4 2 4 2 5 3 5 3 5 3 6 3 6 3 6 4 7 4 7 4 7 4 7 4 8 4 8 5

Class Skills The marshal’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Bluff (Cha), Diplomacy (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (Int), Listen (Wis), Perform (Cha), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), Speak Language (n/a), Spot (Wis), Survival (Wis), and Swim (Str). Skill Points at 1st Level: (4 + Int modifier) × 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 4 + Int modifier.

Class Features All of the following are class features of the marshal. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Marshals are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, with all types of armor (heavy, medium, and light), and with shields (except tower shields). Auras (Ex): The marshal exerts an effect on allies in his vicinity. He can learn to produce different effects, or auras, over the course of his career. The marshal may project one minor aura and (starting at 2nd level) one major aura at a time. Projecting an aura is a swift action (see Chapter 2: Magic). The aura remains in effect until the marshal uses a free action to dismiss it or activates another aura of the same kind (major or minor). A marshal can have an aura active continually; thus, an aura can be in effect at the start of a combat encounter even before the marshal takes his first turn. Activating an aura involves haranguing, ordering, directing, encouraging, cajoling, or calming allies. A marshal sizes up the enemy, allies, and the terrain, then gives allies the direction that they can use to do their best. Unless otherwise noted, a marshal’s aura affects all allies within 60 feet (including himself ) who can hear the marshal. An ally must have an Intelligence score of 3 or higher and be able to understand the marshal’s language to gain the bonus. A marshal’s aura is dismissed if he is dazed, unconscious,

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:07 PM Page 13

times per day at 12th level, four times per day at 16th level, and five times per day at 20th level. A character can take only one extra move action per round. (In other words, two marshals can’t use this ability on the same ally in the same round.) If an ally chooses not to take the extra move action, it is lost.

Half-Elf Marshal Starting Package

Skill Diplomacy Intimidate Listen Ride Spot Swim Gather Information (cc) Climb (cc) Jump (cc)

Ranks 4 4 4 4 4 4 2 2 2

Ability Cha Cha Wis Dex Wis Str Cha Str Str

CHAPTER 1:

Armor: Scale mail (+4 AC, armor check penalty –4, speed 20 ft., 30 lb.). Heavy wooden shield (+2 AC, armor check penalty –2, 10 lb.). Weapons: Longsword (1d8, crit 19–20/×2, 4 lb., one-handed, slashing). Shortbow (1d6, crit ×3, range inc. 60 ft., 2 lb., piercing). Skill Selection: Pick a number of skills equal to 4 + Int modifier.

CHARACTERS

Armor Check Penalty — — — — — –12 — –6 –6

Feat: Weapon Focus (longsword). Minor Aura: Master of tactics. Gear: Backpack with waterskin, one day’s trail rations, bedroll, sack, and flint and steel. Quiver with 20 arrows.Bullseye lantern, 5 pints of oil. Gold: 2d4 gp.

Illus. by S. Tappin

stunned, paralyzed, or otherwise unable to be heard or understood by his allies. A marshal begins play knowing one minor aura of his choice. As his marshal level increases, he gains access to new auras, as indicated on Table 1–5: The Marshal. All bonuses granted by a marshal’s auras are circ*mstance bonuses that do not stack with each other. Minor Aura: A minor aura lets allies add the marshal’s Charisma bonus (if any) to certain rolls. Accurate Strike: Bonus on rolls made to confirm critical hits. Art of War: Bonus on disarm, trip, bull rush, and sunder attempts. Demand Fortitude: Bonus on Fortitude saves. Determined Caster: Bonus on rolls to overcome spell resistance. Force of Will: Bonus on Will saves. Master of Opportunity: Bonus to Armor Class against attacks of opportunity. Master of Tactics: Bonus on damage rolls when flanking. Motivate Charisma: Bonus on Charisma checks and Charismabased skill checks. Motivate Constitution: Bonus on Constitution checks and Constitution-based skill checks. Motivate Dexterity: Bonus on Dexterity checks, Dexterity-based skill checks, and initiative checks. Motivate Intelligence: Bonus on Intelligence checks and Intelligence-based skill checks. Motivate Strength: Bonus on Strength checks and Strength-based skill checks. Motivate Wisdom: Bonus on Wisdom checks and Wisdom-based skill checks. Over the Top: Bonus on damage rolls when charging. Watchful Eye: Bonus on Reflex saves. Major Aura: Beginning at 2nd level, a marshal can project a major aura in addition to his minor aura. A major aura lets allies add +1 to certain rolls. This bonus improves by +1 at 7th, 14th, and 20th level. Hardy Soldiers: The marshal’s allies gain damage reduction equal to the amount of bonus the aura provides. For example, if the marshal is 10th level, everyone affected gains DR 2/–. Motivate Ardor: Bonus on damage rolls. Motivate Attack: Bonus on melee attack rolls. Motivate Care: Bonus to Armor Class. Motivate Urgency: Allies’ base land speed is increased by a number of feet equal to 5 × the amount of bonus the aura provides. For example, the allies of a 10th-level marshal (+2 major aura) add 10 feet to their base land speed. Resilient Troops: Bonus on all saves. Steady Hand: Bonus on ranged attack rolls. Skill Focus (Diplomacy): Because a marshal has a way with people, he gains this feat as a bonus feat. If the marshal already has the feat, he can choose a different one. Grant Move Action (Ex): Starting at 4th level, a marshal can direct and motivate his allies to act immediately. Once per day, as a standard action, he may grant an extra move action to any or all of his allies within 30 feet (but not to himself ). Each of the affected allies takes this extra move action immediately, acting in their current initiative order. This extra action does not affect the allies’ initiative count; the round continues normally after the marshal’s turn is over. (This may mean, for example, that an ally whose initiative count immediately follows the marshal’s may get an extra move action from the marshal, followed directly by a full round worth of actions on the ally’s turn.) At 8th level, a marshal gains the ability to grant an extra move action to his allies twice per day. The frequency increases to three

Half-Orc Monk

13

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:08 PM Page 14

Illus. by T. Hairsine

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

WARMAGE

14

Some spellcasters care for only one thing: war. They dream of steel and mighty blasts of devastating magic, the march of troops, and the unleashed destruction found on battlefields everywhere. Graduates of special arcane war colleges, those known as warmages are drilled only and utterly in the casting of spells most useful for laying down destruction, confusing an enemy, or screening an allied action. The utilitarian spells used by wizards and sorcerers have little importance to the warmage’s way of thinking. What are support casters for, after all? The warmage cares only for success on the battlefield, or, in some cases, in the series of smaller campaigns favored by adventuring companies. Adventures: Warmages sign up for stints with adventuring companies that require straightforward, militarystyle blasting magic. Warmages hone and develop their arts through action rather than study, so without prolonged use of their powers A warmage in combat they cannot reach the pinnacle of their profession. Good-aligned warmages are concerned with rebuffing the movements of warlike groups—who better to blast into smoking ruin than those who have it coming? Evil-aligned warmages feel no constraints on who might become the targets of their spells. They adventure to gain destructive power. Characteristics: Warmages access their magic peculiarly, at least compared to the way wizards, sorcerers, and cleric do its. A warmage selects his spells from a limited pool of knowledge that rarely changes. Early in his difficult training, each warmage instills deep within himself the knowledge of all the spells he’ll ever need. Warmages know fewer spells than wizards and sorcerers do, but the spells they do know are enhanced. A warmage does not need to study a spellbook, but does need to prepare his spells each day by spending time to call up the knowledge from his unconscious mind. Warmages do not specialize in certain schools of magic the way wizards may. In their time spent training, warmages also learn a few mundane warlike skills. They develop proficiency with some weapons and armor. They learn to use such items without incurring a risk of spell failure. Alignment: Because all alignments must be prepared to fight for their causes, warmages might be found among virtually any army that uses spellcasting as artillery on the battlefield. Religion: Some warmages favor Boccob (god of magic), while others follow Wee Jas (goddess of death and magic). Many warmages revere no deity at all. Background: Warmages are chosen (or apply) to attend special arcane war colleges. Such colleges are not for the weak of spirit. The rigors of both body and mind bear little resemblance to the apprenticeship undergone by regular wizards, or the selftaught fumbling of sorcerers. Warmage colleges are more similar to boot camps sponsored by large nation-states. Throughout their training, warmages are forced to constantly wear ponderous

garments (meant to familiarize their bodies with the limitations of movement in armor) while drilling constantly with spells, most of which are too high in level to be cast by the student. This vigorous drilling instills the spells in the warmage’s unconscious mind, so that as he grows in power later in life, those spells become available for his use without his needing a spellbook. After their training, warmages share a deep feeling of camaraderie with their fellow students, and continue to feel a slight affection for any well-run military outfit. Races: Most warmages are humans or half-elves. But the toughness of spirit needed to survive a term at an arcane war college can manifest itself in any of the common races. It is rare for savage humanoids to be accepted into a war college, though some of the more organized societies may set up their own war colleges for arcane spellcasters. Other Classes: Warmages find they have little in common with sorcerers and wizards, who learn their craft without the rigors or discipline of the warmage’s apprenticeship. In fact, warmages are likely to be more comfortable with the regimented classes—those that appreciate military training, such as paladins, monks, and fighters. Role: The warmage’s spell selection is already determined. He is the ranged magical artillery that military troops rely on, or the center of a smaller adventuring company’s offensive power. An adventuring company with a warmage should strongly consider including a second spellcaster, such as a bard, cleric, druid, healer, or even a wizard, to complement the warmage’s offensive focus with defensive and utilitarian abilities.

GAME RULE INFORMATION Warmages have the following game statistics. Abilities: Charisma determines how powerful a spell a warmage can cast, how many spells the warmage can cast per day, and how hard those spells are to resist (see Spells, below). Like a sorcerer or wizard, a warmage benefits from high Dexterity and Constitution scores. Alignment: Any. Hit Die: d6.

Class Skills The warmage’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Intimidate (Cha), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (history) (Int), Profession (Wis), and Spellcraft (Int). Skill Points at 1st Level: (2 + Int modifier) × 4. Skill Points at Each Additional Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Class Features All of the following are class features of the warmage. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Warmages are proficient with all simple weapons, light armor, and light shields. At 8th level, a warmage gains proficiency with medium armor. (See also Armored Mage, below.) Spells: A warmage casts arcane spells (the same type of spells available to sorcerers and wizards), which are drawn from the warmage spell list given below. He can cast any spell he

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:08 PM Page 15

CHAPTER 1:

CHARACTERS Illus. by D. Hanley

damage normally, plus an extra 3 points of damage due to his knows without preparing it ahead of time the way a cleric or Intelligence bonus. wizard must. A single spell can never gain this extra damage more To cast a spell, a warmage must have a Charisma than once per casting. For instance, a fireball deals score of 10 + the spell’s level (Cha 10 for 0-level the extra damage to all creatures in the area it spells, Cha 11 for 1st-level spells, and so affects. However, if a 3rd-level warmage casts forth). The Difficulty Class for a saving magic missile and produces two missiles, only throw against a warmage’s spell is 10 + the spell’s one of them (of the warmage’s choice) gains the extra level + the warmage’s Charisma modifier. damage, even if both missiles are directed at the same target. Like other spellcasters, a warmage can cast only If a spell deals damage for more than one round, it gains this a certain number of spells of each spell level per extra damage in each round. day. His base daily spell allotment is given on Advanced Learning (Ex): At 3rd, 6th, 11th, and 16th Table 1–6: The Warmage. In addition, he receives level, a warmage may add a new spell to his or her list, reprebonus spells for a high Charisma score (see senting the result of personal study and experimentation. Table 1–1, page 8 of the Player’s Handbook). The spell must be a wizard spell of the evocation school, and Unlike a cleric or wizard, a warmage need of a level no higher than that of the highest-level spell the not prepare his spells in advance. He can warmage already knows. Once a new spell is selected, it is cast any spell he knows at any time, assumforever added to that warmage’s spell list and ing he has not yet used up his spells per may be cast just like any other spell day for that spell level. on the warmage’s list. Armored Mage (Ex): Normally, armor Sudden Empower: At 7th level, a of any type interferes with an arcane spellwarmage gains Sudden Empower caster’s gestures, which can cause his (described later in this chapter) as a spells to fail (if those spells have somatic bonus feat. If the warmage already has components). Warmages’ limited focus and the feat, he can choose a different one. specialized training, however, allow them to Sudden Enlarge: At 10th level, a warmage avoid arcane spell failure as long as they stick gains Sudden Enlarge (described later in this to light armor and light shields. This training chapter) as a bonus feat. If the warmage already has does not extend to medium or heavier the feat, he can choose a different one. armors, nor to heavy shields. Nor does this abilSudden Widen: At 15th level, a warity apply to spells gained from a different spellmage gains Sudden Widen (described casting class. later in this chapter) as a bonus feat. If At 8th level, a warmage learns to use medium the warmage already has the feat, he can armor with no chance of arcane spell failure. choose a different one. Warmage Edge (Ex): Warmages are specialized Sudden Maximize: At 20th level, a in dealing damage with their spells. Whenever warmage gains Sudden Maximize a warmage casts a spell that deals hit point (described later in this chapter) as a damage, he adds his Intelligence bonus (if bonus feat. If the warmage already any) to the amount of damage dealt. For has the feat, he can choose a differinstance, if a 1st-level warmage with 17 IntelVadania, Half-Elf Druid ent one. ligence casts magic missile, he deals 1d4+1 points of

Table 1–6: The Warmage Level 1st

Base Attack Bonus +0

2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th 11th 12th 13th 14th 15th 16th 17th 18th 19th 20th

+1 +1 +2 +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6/+1 +6/+1 +7/+2 +7/+2 +8/+3 +8/+3 +9/+4 +9/+4 +10/+5

Fort Save +0

Ref Save +0

Will Save +2

+0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6

+0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3 +3 +4 +4 +4 +5 +5 +5 +6 +6 +6

+3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7 +7 +8 +8 +9 +9 +10 +10 +11 +11 +12

Special Armored mage (light), warmage edge — Advanced learning — — Advanced learning Sudden Empower Armored mage (medium) — Sudden Enlarge Advanced learning — — — Sudden Widen Advanced learning — — — Sudden Maximize

0 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

—————— Spells per Day —————— 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 3 — — — — — — — — 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

— — 3 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

— — — — 3 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

— — — — — — 3 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

— — — — — — — — 3 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

— — — — — — — — — — 3 4 5 6 6 6 6 6 6

— — — — — — — — — — — — 3 4 5 6 6 6 6

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — 3 4 5 6 6

— — — — — — — — — — — — — — — — 3 4 5

15

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:08 PM Page 16

Warmage Spell List

Illus. by D. Hanley

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

Warmages choose their spells from the following list. 0 Level: acid splash, disrupt undead, light, ray of frost. 1st Level: lesser acid orb*, burning hands, chill touch, lesser cold orb*, lesser electric orb*, lesser fire orb*, magic missile, shocking grasp, sleep, lesser sonic orb*, true strike. 2nd Level: blades of fire*, continual flame, fireburst*, fire trap, flaming sphere, Melf ’s acid arrow, pyrotechnics, scorching ray, shatter. 3rd Level: fire shield, fireball, flame arrow, gust of wind, ice storm, lightning bolt, poison, ring of blades*, sleet storm, stinking cloud. 4th Level: blast of flame*, contagion, Evard’s black tentacles, phantasmal killer, shout, wall of fire. 5th Level: arc of lightning*, cloudkill, cone of cold, legion’s fire shield*, greater fireburst*, flamestrike. 6th Level: acid fog, blade barrier, chain lightning, circle of death, disintegrate, fire seeds, Otiluke’s freezing sphere, Tenser’s transformation. 7th Level: delayed blast fireball, earthquake, finger of death, fire storm, Mordenkainen’s sword, prismatic spray, sunbeam, waves of exhaustion. 8th Level: greater shout, horrid wilting, incendiary cloud, polar ray, prismatic wall, scintillating pattern, sunburst. 9th Level: elemental swarm, implosion, meteor swarm, prismatic sphere, wail of the banshee, weird. * New spell described in Chapter 2 of this book.

Human Warmage Starting Package Armor: Studded leather (+3 AC, armor check penalty –1, speed 30 ft., 20 lb.). Weapons: Spear (1d8, crit ×3, range inc. 20 ft., 6 lb., two-handed, piercing). Light crossbow (1d8, crit 19–20/×2, range inc. 80 ft., 4 lb., piercing). Skill Selection: Pick a number of skills equal to 3 + Int modifier.

Gnome Recruit

Skill Spellcraft Concentration Knowledge (arcana) Intimidate Survival (cc) Diplomacy (cc) Hide (cc)

Ranks 4 4 4 4 2 2 2

Ability Int Con Int Cha Wis Cha Dex

Armor Check Penalty — — — — — — –1

Feat: Combat Casting. Bonus Feat: Toughness. Gear: Backpack with waterskin, one day’s trail rations, bedroll, sack, and flint and steel. Case with 10 crossbow bolts. Spell component pouch. Three torches. Gold: 1d4 gp.

PRESTIGE CLASSES

This section details seven new prestige classes, briefly described below. Bonded Summoner: A spellcaster with strong elemental ties. Dragon Samurai: A warrior with draconic traits. Havoc Mage: An arcane spellcaster who casts spells while making physical attacks. Skullclan Hunter: A ruthless stalker of the undead. Tactical Soldier: The master of melee teamwork. War Hulk: A giant trained to hammer smaller foes. Warchief: A savage battle leader.

BONDED SUMMONER

He who learns to leash the furies of the Elemental Planes is known as a bonded summoner. The mightiest manifestation of those planes, in their various potencies, is the elemental. And the bonded summoner knows elementals. He has studied their ways, means, origins, and formation. He instinctively knows an elemental’s strengths and develops an unbreakable bond with a powerful elemental companion. As this bond deepens over time, the bonded summoner’s kinship with the elemental forces he controls

Table 1–7: The Bonded Summoner Level 1st

16

Base Attack Bonus +0

Fort Save +0

Ref Save +0

Will Save +2

2nd 3rd

+1 +1

+0 +1

+0 +1

+3 +3

4th 5th

+2 +2

+1 +1

+1 +1

+4 +4

6th 7th

+3 +3

+2 +2

+2 +2

+5 +5

8th 9th

+4 +4

+2 +3

+2 +3

+6 +6

10th

+5

+3

+3

+7

Special Spells per Day Elemental companion (Medium), — resistance to energy 5 — +1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class Elemental companion (Large), — resistance to energy 10, immunity to sleep — +1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class Elemental companion (Huge), — resistance to energy 15, immunity to poison — +1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class Elemental companion (greater), — resistance to energy 20, immunity to paralysis, stun — +1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class Elemental companion (elder), — cannot be flanked, immunity to energy Elemental form, elemental type, +1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class immunity to critical hits

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:09 PM Page 17

REQUIREMENTS To qualify to become a bonded summoner, a character must fulfill all the following criteria. Skills: Knowledge (the planes) 8 ranks, Speak Language (Aquan, Auran, Ignan, or Terran). Spells: Able to cast 2nd-level arcane spells. Special: Must have a familiar. The bonded summoner’s class skills are Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Decipher Script (Int), Knowledge (Int), Profession (Wis), and Spellcraft (Int). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

CLASS FEATURES

A bonded summoner has an elemental companion that starts at Medium size and grows larger as the bonded summoner’s level increases. Arcane Level Up to 8th 9th–11th 12th or higher

Special Deliver touch spells, devotion, empathic link, improved evasion, share spells Spell resistance Improved speed

Elemental Companion Basics: Use the statistics for an elemental of the appropriate size as found in the Monster Manual, but make the following changes: Arcane Level: The bonded summoner’s total of levels in the bonded summoner class and other arcane spellcasting classes. Deliver Touch Spells (Su): A companion can deliver touch spells for the bonded summoner. If the bonded summoner and the companion are in contact at the time the bonded summoner casts a touch spell, he can designate his companion as the “toucher.” The companion can then deliver the touch spell just as the bonded summoner could. As usual, if the bonded summoner casts another touch spell before the touch is delivered, the touch spell dissipates. Devotion (Ex): An elemental companion’s devotion to the bonded summoner is so complete that it gains a +4 morale bonus on Will saves against enchantment spells and effects. Empathic Link (Su): The bonded summoner has an empathic link with his elemental companion out to a distance of 1 mile. The bonded

Illus. by D. Hanley

All of the following are class features of the bonded summoner prestige class. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Bonded summoners gain no proficiency with any weapon or armor. Spells per Day: At every evennumbered level gained in the bonded summoner class, the character gains new spells per day as if he had also gained a level in an arcane spellcasting class he belonged to A bonded summoner before adding the prestige class. He does

pqqqqrs BONDED SUMMONER’S ELEMENTAL COMPANION

CHAPTER 1:

CLASS SKILLS

CHARACTERS

deepens, blurring the line between summoner and summoned. Eventually, this journey of discovery leads to his own ability to take on the form of that which he could formerly only summon. The knowledge required to learn the secrets of the Outer Planes is arcane in nature, and thus this prestige class is filled mostly with sorcerers and wizards— though anyone else who meets the requirements may choose to take the journey of a bonded summoner. NPC bonded summoners are usually loners, though they may organize with specialists or fellow bonded summoners of their element if threatened. Other NPC bonded summoners are content to join their abilities with companies of adventurers to explore all the avenues of elementals. Because a bonded summoner brings with him a powerful ally, most groups are happy to form such an alliance. Hit Die: d4.

summoner cannot see through the companion’s eyes, but they can communicate empathically. Note that even intelligent elementals see the world differently from humans, so misunderstandings are always possible. Because of this empathic link, the bonded summoner has the same connection to an item or place that his companion does, just as a master and his familiar (see the Familiars sidebar, page 52 of the Player’s Handbook). Improved Evasion (Ex): When subjected to an attack that normally allows a Reflex save for half damage, an elemental companion takes no damage if it makes a successful saving throw and half damage even if the saving throw fails. Share Spells: At the bonded summoner’s option, he may have any spell (but not any spell-like ability) he casts on himself also affect his elemental companion. The companion must be within 5 feet at the time of casting to receive the benefit. If the spell or effect has a duration other than instantaneous, it stops affecting the companion if the creature moves farther than 5 feet away and will not affect the companion again even if it returns to the bonded summoner before the duration expires. Additionally, the bonded summoner may cast a spell with a target of “You” on his companion (as a touch range spell) instead of on himself. A bonded summoner and his companion can share spells even if the spells normally do not affect elementals. Spell Resistance (Ex): If the bonded summoner’s arcane spellcaster level is 9th or higher, an elemental companion gains spell resistance equal to the bonded summoner’s arcane spellcaster level + 5. Improved Speed (Ex): All of the elemental companion’s speed figures increase by 10 feet.

pqqqqrs

17

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:09 PM Page 18

damage, but he must still wait 24 hours before summoning another elemental. Resistance to Energy (Ex): A bonded summoner gains resistance 5 against the energy type associated with his element of study.

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

Element Air Earth Fire Water

Purple Dragon Knight illus. by G. Staples Dragon Samurai illus. by T. Hairsine

Purple Dragon Knight

18

not, however, gain all the benefits a character of that class would have gained (metamagic or item creation feats, and so on), except for an increased effective level of spellcasting. If a character had more than one arcane spellcasting class before becoming a bonded summoner, he must decide to which class he adds the new level for purposes of determining spells per day. Elemental Companion (Ex): At 1st level, a bonded summoner picks his element of study: air, earth, fire, or water. This choice cannot be changed. The bonded summoner calls a Medium elemental of the type chosen, which replaces his familiar. The elemental gets abilities according to the information in the accompanying sidebar. At 3rd level, his elemental companion grows to Large. At 5th level, it grows to Huge. At 7th level, the companion becomes a greater elemental, and at 9th level it becomes an elder elemental. If the elemental companion dies, the bonded summoner takes damage equal to the elemental’s Hit Dice. The bonded summoner also takes 1d4 points of damage to each ability score. A new elemental of the same kind as the old one may be summoned 24 hours later. A bonded summoner may dismiss his elemental at any time without taking this

Energy Electricity Acid Fire Cold

At 3rd level, this resistance improves to 10. At 5th level, it improves to 15. At 7th level, it improves to 20. At 9th level, the character gains immunity to the energy type in question. Immunities (Ex): Over time, a bonded summoner slowly turns into an elemental, gaining an elemental’s immunities along the way. At 3rd level, he becomes immune to sleep effects. At 5th level, he becomes immune to poison. At 7th level, he becomes immune to paralysis and stunning. At 10th level, he is no longer subject to critical hits. Cannot Be Flanked (Ex): At 9th level, a bonded summoner has become so much like an elemental that he loses the normal human orientation toward “front” and “back.” Like an elemental, he can’t be flanked. Elemental Form (Su): At 10th level, a bonded summoner gains the ability to turn himself into an elemental and back again once per day. This elemental is an elder elemental of the bonded summoner’s element of study. This ability functions like the polymorph spell, except as noted here. The effect lasts for 10 hours, or until the bonded summoner changes back. Changing form (to elemental or back) is a standard action that does not provoke an attack of opportunity. Elemental Type: At 10th level, a bonded summoner’s type changes to elemental, and he gains the subtype of the appropriate element. He loses any other elemental subtypes he may have.

DRAGON SAMURAI

Dragon samurai are dedicated warriors, members of a special, self-selected class who revere dragonkind and emulate dragons’ ferocious martial abilities to the point of taking on some draconic traits. Unlike noble samurai, who are born to their role and into a system of allegiance, dragon samurai are made, not born. Sometimes, orthodox samurai fall out of the system and find their way into a dragon clan (see below), but more often, those previously unfettered with allegiance swear fealty to a chosen dragon clan. It is then A copper dragon samurai that they begin their training in the arts of draconic warfare and discipline. Each dragon samurai is bound to a single dragon clan, of which there are ten. Five good dragon clans are each devoted to a kind of metallic dragon, and five evil dragon clans are each devoted to a kind of chromatic dragon. Dragon samurai adhere to their own unique bushido (a samurai’s code of honor). However, they swear loyalty and obedience to a clan, not to a lord. If a dragon samurai remains true to her bushido, in time the fires of the dragon awaken within her.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:09 PM Page 19

Martial classes of all types can apply for membership in dragon clans. Basically, anyone with an abiding interest in or reverence for dragons may eventually qualify for clan membership. If the dragon’s roar is as a song to one’s ears, she should consider becoming a dragon samurai. NPC dragon samurai are solid, stalwart warriors of their clans. They advance the clan’s secret agendas, which can be as simple as a quick commission or as grand as an all-consuming crusade. Hit Die: d10.

CLASS SKILLS A dragon samurai’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Profession (Wis), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), and Swim (Str). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Level 1st

Base Attack Bonus +0

Fort Save +2

Ref Save +0

Will Save +2

2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

+1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

+3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

+0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

+3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Special Dragon breath, resistance to energy 5 Dragon friend Immune to dragon fear Elemental weapon +1d6 Resistance to energy 10 Dragon ride Resistance to energy 15 Blind-Fight Elemental weapon +2d6 Resistance to energy 20

Illus. by G. Staples

Table 1–8: The Dragon Samurai

Resistance to Energy (Su): A dragon samurai gains resistance 5 against attacks involving the same energy type as the character’s breath weapon (for example, acid for a green dragon samurai). At 5th level, the resistance improves to 10. At 7th level it improves to 15, and at 10th level it becomes 20. Dragon Friend (Ex): Starting at 2nd level, a dragon samurai gets a +4 circ*mstance bonus on all Charisma-based checks when dealing with dragons of his clan’s color. Immune to Dragon Fear (Ex): Starting at 3rd level, a dragon samurai is immune to fear effects from a dragon of her clan’s color. Elemental Weapon (Su): Starting at 4th level, a dragon samurai can endow a melee weapon with elemental energy while she wields it in battle. This energy is of the same type as her breath weapon. Causing a weapon or weapons to gain this feature is a free action. At 4th level, the melee weapon deals an extra 1d6 points of energy damage, and this extra damage increases to 2d6 at 9th level. This extra damage does stack with any energy damage the weapon may already deal. Dragon Ride (Ex): Starting at 6th level, a dragon samurai gets a +4 bonus on all Ride checks while riding a dragon.

CHAPTER 1:

To qualify to become a dragon samurai, a character must fulfill all the following criteria. Alignment: Depends on the color of the dragon samurai’s clan, as follows. Black, Red, or White: Chaotic neutral, neutral evil, or chaotic evil. Blue or Green: Lawful neutral, lawful evil, or neutral evil. Brass or Copper: Neutral good, chaotic good, or chaotic neutral. Bronze, Gold, or Silver: Lawful good, neutral good, or lawful neutral. Base Attack Bonus: +5. Skills: Knowledge (arcana) 2 ranks. Special: The character must have no experience as a dragon samurai of a different clan.

CHARACTERS

REQUIREMENTS

Color Energy Breath Weapon* Black acid 60-ft. line of acid Blue electricity 60-ft. line of lightning Green acid 30-ft. cone of corrosive (acid) gas Red fire 30-ft. cone of fire White cold 30-ft. cone of cold Brass fire 60-ft. line of fire Bronze electricity 60-ft. line of lightning Copper acid 60-ft. line of acid Gold fire 30-ft. cone of fire Silver cold 30-ft. cone of cold *Breath weapon sizes given here are for Medium creatures. For creatures of other sizes, see the Dragon Breath Weapons table on page 69 of the Monster Manual.

Lion Falcon Monk

CLASS FEATURES All of the following are class features of the dragon samurai prestige class. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Dragon samurai gain no proficiency with any weapon or armor. Dragon Breath (Su): A dragon samurai can use a breath weapon once per day as a standard action. The type of breath weapon depends on the color of the dragon samurai’s clan, as noted below. The breath weapon deals 1d8 points of damage per class level. The Reflex save DC for the breath weapon is 10 + the dragon samurai’s class level + the dragon samurai’s Con modifier. If a dragon samurai already has a breath weapon of the same type, the damage stacks. For example, if a half-dragon character has a breath weapon dealing 6d8 points of damage once per day, and gains a breath weapon of the same type that deals 2d8 points of damage for being a 2nd-level dragon samurai, her damage increases to 8d8. She still gets to use her breath weapon only once per day.

19

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:10 PM Page 20

Blind-Fight: At 8th level, a dragon samurai gains Blind-Fight as a bonus feat. If the character already has the feat, she can choose a different one.

HAVOC MAGE

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

Combat magic is usually reserved for spellcasters in the second rank who are content to lob spells as if artillery from behind the cover of front-rank combatants. Not so the havoc mage, who shares as much in common with a fighter as with a wizard. The havoc mage has learned to toss off spells with such reckless abandon that he can fight head-to-head with both sword and spell without incurring the bitter consequences other spellcasters must contend with. A havoc mage is interested in maximum carnage in the shortest amount of time, by dint of a quick spell cast where an enemy least expects it. A havoc mage must first learn the ways of arcane magic, so those most likely to take up the sword (to complement the wand) are sorcerers and wizards. These normally sedate characters are drawn to the frenzy of battle, during which a flashing sword can be just as effective in their own hands as a well-timed spell. NPC havoc mages are more likely than other spellcasters to be lone adventurers, since they are adept both at arms and magic. However, the most successful havoc mages are those who join their talents with those of a balanced group of combatants and spellcasters. Hit Die: d8.

Illus. by T. Hairsine

REQUIREMENTS To qualify to become a havoc mage, a character must fulfill all the following criteria. Base Attack Bonus: +4. Skills: Knowledge (arcana) 5 ranks. Spells: Able to cast 2nd-level arcane spells.

CLASS SKILLS The havoc mage’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str), Concentration (Con), Craft (Int), Handle Animal (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Ride (Dex), Spellcraft (Int), and Swim (Str). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

CLASS FEATURES All of the following are class features of the havoc mage. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Havoc mages gain no proficiency with any weapon or armor. Spells per Day: At 2nd, 4th, and 5th level, a havoc mage gains new spells per day as if he had also gained a level in an arcane spellcasting class he belonged to before adding the prestige class. He does not, however, gain all the benefits a character of that class would have gained (metamagic or item creation feats, and so on), except for an increased effective level of spellcasting. If a character had more than one arcane spellcasting class before becoming a havoc mage, he must decide to which class he adds the new level for purposes of determining spells per day.

A havoc mage

Battlecast (Ex): A havoc mage gains the ability to cast spells of a certain level or lower while making a weapon attack. He may take a full-round action to attack and cast a spell. The spell must be an arcane spell he knows of 2nd level or lower with a casting time of 1 standard action or less. When using his battlecast ability, a havoc mage may cast spells requiring somatic components even if he has no free hands. Using battlecast does not provoke attacks of opportunity. At 3rd level and higher, a havoc mage can battlecast a spell of 4th level or lower. At 5th level, a havoc mage can battlecast a spell of 8th level or lower. The battlecast ability does not grant a havoc mage any relief from the arcane spell failure chance imparted by armor.

SKULLCLAN HUNTER

The skullclan hunter is the acclaimed foe of unlife. He champions life by tracking and eradicating all creatures that mock it with evil intent. His devotion to his task is such that he spends moonless nights and weary days tracking undead to their lairs, or when possible, joining a military band that is likely to come against a legion of the dead.

Table 1–9: The Havoc Mage

20

Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th

Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +2 +3 +3

Fort Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4

Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1

Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4

Special Battlecast 2nd — Battlecast 4th — Battlecast 8th

Spells per Day — +1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class — +1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class +1 level of existing arcane spellcasting class

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:38 PM Page 21

To qualify to become a skullclan hunter, a character must fulfill all the following criteria. Alignment: Any good. Skills: Knowledge (religion) 8 ranks. Special: Able to turn undead; sneak attack +2d6.

CLASS SKILLS The skullclan hunter’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Balance (Dex), Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Craft (Int), Decipher Script (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Disable Device (Int), Disguise (Cha), Escape Artist (Dex), Forgery (Int), Gather Information (Cha), Hide (Dex), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Knowledge (arcana) (Int), Knowledge (religion) (Int), Listen

Level 1st 2nd 3rd

Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +2

Fort Save +0 +0 +1

Ref Save +2 +3 +3

Will Save +2 +3 +3

4th

+3

+1

+4

+4

5th 6th 7th 8th

+3 +4 +5 +6

+1 +2 +2 +2

+4 +5 +5 +6

+4 +5 +5 +6

9th

+6

+3

+6

+6

10th

+7

+3

+7

+7

Special Track undead Divine strike Immunity to undead fear, sneak attack +1d6 Immunity to disease, protection from evil Sword of light Sneak attack +2d6 Immunity to paralysis Immunity to ability drain or damage Sneak attack +3d6, sword of darkness Immunity to energy drain

CLASS FEATURES All of the following are class features of the skullclan hunter prestige class. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Skullclan hunters gain no proficiency with any weapon or armor. Track Undead (Ex): A skullclan hunter gains the ability to track undead (only) as if using the Track feat. A skullclan hunter uses his Knowledge (religion) skill modifier instead of his Survival modifier for the skill checks associated with this feat. Divine Strike (Ex): Due to his specialized skill, training, and connection with the forces of light, a skullclan hunter of 2nd level or higher can make a special attack that is infused with positive energy. Effectively, this ability allows him to deal extra damage to undead as though making a sneak attack. Divine strike damage applies to any sneak attack dice the skullclan hunter already has, as well as those gained through advancement in this class. Immunities (Ex): As he grows in power, a skullclan hunter develops immunities to special attacks that are common among undead creatures. At 3rd level, he gains immunity to all fear-based effects and spells from undead. At 4th level, he gains immunity to disease (regardless of the source). At 7th level, he gains immunity to paralysis. At 8th level, he gains immunity to ability drain or damage. At 10th level, he gains immunity to energy drain. Sneak Attack: At 3rd level, a skullclan hunter’s sneak attack damage increases by 1d6. This extra damage stacks with the sneak attack damage he already deals. At 6th level, his sneak attack damage increases to 2d6. At 9th level, it increases to 3d6. Protection from Evil (Su): Starting at 4th level, a skullclan hunter benefits from a permanent protection from evil effect upon himself. Sword of Light (Su): Any weapon (melee or ranged, manufactured or natural) wielded by a skullclan hunter of 5th level or higher overcomes the damage reduction of any undead creature. Sword of Darkness (Su): Any weapon (melee or ranged, manufactured or natural) wielded by a skullclan hunter of 9th level or higher counts as a ghost touch weapon, allowing it to hit incorporeal creatures without the usual 50% miss chance for such attacks.

Illus. by A. Smith

A rogue who has become a skullclan hunter

Table 1–10: The Skullclan Hunter

CHAPTER 1:

REQUIREMENTS

(Wis), Move Silently (Dex), Open Lock (Dex), Search (Int), Sense Motive (Wis), Spot (Wis), Swim (Str), and Tumble (Dex). Skill Points at Each Level: 6 + Int modifier.

CHARACTERS

A skullclan hunter is most often a rogue who has had a terrible encounter with a creature of unlife. Because of that encounter, he comes to realize that using his own skills against living creatures only serves to create more fodder for unlife to take root, so he dedicates himself to the eradication of undead. Following through on this decision, he takes up the cleric class to gain the ability to turn undead (and perhaps to acquire the needed knowledge of religion more quickly). Multiclass rogue/clerics are the characters best suited for this class. NPC skullclan hunters fill out special positions in companies that know they will soon be threatened by undead. While a skullclan hunter’s abilities are still useful in situations other than the immediate threat of undead action, the character really shines only when putting the fear of discorporation into sentient undead. Hit Die: d6.

21

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:39 PM Page 22

TACTICAL SOLDIER

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

The tactical soldier is the master of teamwork in melee. She has trained in cooperative battle tactics and knows how to take advantage of position and timing to make herself and her teammates a deadly, unified force in battle. No other force compares to a group of melee-worthy combatants along with a tactical soldier in the wings, ready to multiply the total deadly effectiveness of the group by far more than their number alone would indicate. It takes a special kind of person to give up the limelight in favor of teamwork. Those with the necessary ability to think about the objective first and their own glory second make ideal tactical soldiers. Fighters, paladins, and rangers are the most common tactical soldiers, knowing just how to multiply the strengths and eradicate the weaknesses of battle-hardened combatants. NPC tactical soldiers make ideal cohorts or hirelings. What fighter wouldn’t want a tactical soldier backing him up, ready to step in and fight when the melee begins? Hit Die: d10.

Illus. by D. Hanley

REQUIREMENTS To qualify to become a tactical soldier, a character must fulfill all the following criteria. Base Attack Bonus: +5. Skills: Sense Motive 2 ranks. Feats: Cleave, Combat Reflexes.

CLASS SKILLS The tactical soldier’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str), Craft (Int), Handle Animal (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), and Swim (Str). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Table 1–11: The Tactical Soldier Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

Base Attack Bonus +1 +2 +3 +4 +5 +6 +7 +8 +9 +10

Fort Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Will Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Special Flanker Sidestep Interpose Defensive shield Offensive strike — Delayed cleave Unbalancing blow — Reciprocal strike

CLASS FEATURES

22

All of the following are class features of the tactical soldier prestige class. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Tactical soldiers are proficient with all simple and martial weapons, with all types of armor (heavy, medium, and light), and with shields (except tower shields).

Flanker (Ex): A tactical soldier can flank enemies from seemingly impossible angles. She can designate any adjacent square as the square from which flanking against an ally is determined (including the square where she stands, as normal). She may designate the square at the beginning of her turn or at any time during her turn. The designated square remains her effective square for flanking until she is no longer adjacent to it or until she chooses a different square (at the start of one of her turns). The character can even choose a square that is impassable or occupied. Sidestep (Ex): At 2nd level, a tactical soldier gains Sidestep (described later in this chapter) as a bonus feat. If she already has the feat, she can choose a different one. Interpose (Ex): A tactical soldier gains this ability, usable three times per day, at 3rd level. When an enemy threatens her in melee and makes a successful attack against an adjacent ally of hers, the tactical soldier may take the damage (and other effects) of the blow as if she had been hit instead. Defensive Shield (Ex): Starting at 4th level, whenever a tactical soldier fights defensively, she provides up to two adjacent allies with a +2 dodge bonus to Armor Class, though their attack rolls do not take the normal –4 penalty (but her attack A tactical soldier rolls still do). Offensive Strike (Ex): Starting at 5th level, in times of urgency a tactical soldier can lower all her defenses to make a very aggressive attack. When making an offensive strike, the tactical soldier gains a +4 bonus on melee attack rolls and damage rolls for 1 round. Until her next turn, however, she is wide open to physical and magical attacks. All successful attack rolls made against the tactical soldier are automatic threats, and all saving throws the tactical soldier makes against spells automatically fail. Delayed Cleave (Ex): Starting at 7th level, if the last creature a tactical soldier hit in melee is dropped by someone other than her, and the tactical soldier still threatens that creature’s square, she may make a cleave attack as an attack of opportunity. All normal restrictions on cleave attempts and attacks of opportunity apply. Unbalancing Blow (Ex): Starting at 8th level, a tactical soldier can use a full-round action to make a strategic melee attack against an enemy. If the attack succeeds, in addition to dealing regular damage, the blow unbalances the target so much that it provokes attacks of opportunity from creatures threatening its square. This ability works only on creatures up to one size category larger than the tactical soldier. Reciprocal Strike (Ex): A 10th-level tactical soldier can make an attack of opportunity (subject to normal restrictions) against a foe that successfully attacks an ally of the soldier and deals damage. She can use this ability three times per day.

WAR HULK

Against the marshaled forces of the enemy army, the war hulk stands tall, confident in his power against lesser soldiers. And why not? He is a creature of great size and talent who is specifically trained to shock and awe opposing massed troops. A hulk indeed, he knows how to spread his mighty blows across a wide

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:39 PM Page 23

To qualify to become a war hulk, a character must fulfill all the following criteria. Base Attack Bonus: +5. Feats: Cleave. Special: Must be Large or larger.

CLASS SKILLS The war hulk’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Climb (Str), Intimidate (Cha), and Jump (Str). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Table 1–12: The War Hulk Fort Save +2

Ref Save +0

Will Save +0

2nd

+0

+3

+0

+0

3rd

+0

+3

+1

+1

4th

+0

+4

+1

+1

5th 6th

+0 +0

+4 +5

+1 +2

+1 +2

7th 8th

+0 +0

+5 +6

+2 +2

+2 +2

9th

+0

+6

+3

+3

10th

+0

+7

+3

+3

Special No time to think, ability boost (Str +2) Great swing, ability boost (Str +2) Mighty rock throwing, ability boost (Str +2) Mighty swing, ability boost (Str +2) Ability boost (Str +2) Sweeping boulder, ability boost (Str +2) Ability boost (Str +2) Massive sweeping boulder, Toughness, ability boost (Str +2) Ability boost (Str +2), Toughness Massive swing, Toughness, ability boost (Str +2)

Illus. by D. Hanley

Level 1st

Base Attack Bonus +0

CHAPTER 1:

REQUIREMENTS

action, the war hulk can choose three squares adjacent to one another (he must threaten all of them). His attack applies to all creatures in those squares. Make one attack roll and apply that roll as an attack against each defender. If the war hulk uses a special attack (such as disarm, trip, or sunder), this special attack affects only the first target; the other creatures are attacked normally. Walls and similar obstacles can block a great swing. Start with one square that the war hulk threatens. Each successive square chosen must be adjacent to the previous square and have line of effect from that square. Two squares separated by a wall, for instance, can’t be chosen as adjacent squares for a great swing. The war hulk may skip creatures, attacking only those he wants to. For example, if there are three creatures in a row—an enemy, an ally, and another enemy—the war hulk can choose those three squares for the great swing but strike only the two enemies. If a war hulk drops one of his foes with a great swing, he may make a cleave attack normally. However, he may do so only once for every time he swings, even if he drops more than one foe. Mighty Rock Throwing (Ex): Starting at 3rd level, a war hulk gains a powerful rock throwing ability. The character can throw rocks that deal 2d8 points of damage with a range increment of 50 feet. (Like all thrown weapons, they have a maximum range of five range increments.) The war hulk uses his Strength modifier instead of his Dexterity modifier on the attack roll. The rock must weigh approximately 50 pounds. Mighty Swing (Ex): Starting at 4th level, a war hulk can make a mighty swing. A mighty swing is like a great swing, except that it is a standard action rather than a full-round action. Thus, the character can move and make a mighty swing or (if he can make multiple attacks) make multiple mighty swings in a single round. Sweeping Boulder (Ex): Starting at 6th level, a war hulk is able to throw his rocks with such force that they affect two adjacent squares. (The second square must be farther away from the war hulk than the first—they cannot be equidistant from him.) Make one attack roll and apply the result to each target. As with great swing, the war hulk must have line of effect from one square to the next. Toughness: At 8th, 9th, and 10th level, a war hulk gains Toughness as a bonus feat. Massive Sweeping Boulder (Ex): Starting at 8th level, a war hulk is able to throw his rocks with such force that they affect four squares in a line.

CHARACTERS

area, creating carnage on the battlefield. While a single opponent might evade this massive attack, a massed unit of terrified soldiers are meat on the pounding block. Drawn most often from more intelligent individuals among the various giant kinds, war hulks are trained to fight by similarly large tutors. Other than being big, a war hulk must come to the training already knowing how to fight. Thus, the martial classes, such as fighter, ranger, paladin, and barbarian, are most often promoted into this prestige class—although many giants meet the requirements with no class levels at all. When an NPC war hulk is spied at the head of an army, the event is too significant to call it merely an omen. Instead, it is a clear sign of deadly peril. Hit Die: d12.

CLASS FEATURES All of the following are class features of the war hulk. Weapon and Armor Proficiency: War hulks gain no proficiency with any weapon or armor. Ability Boost (Ex): As a war hulk gains levels in this prestige class, his Strength score increases as noted in Table 1–12: The War Hulk. These increases stack. No Time to Think (Ex): A character with levels in the war hulk prestige class is considered to have 0 ranks in all Intelligence-, Wisdom-, and Charisma-based skills (whether or not he has bought ranks in them previously). The only exception is the Intimidate skill, which works normally. Great Swing (Ex): Starting at 2nd level, a war hulk is able to make a great, sweeping swing with a melee weapon. As a full-round

An ogre war hulk

23

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:39 PM Page 24

(Each successive square chosen must be farther away from the character.) Only the first creature can be subject to damage from a critical hit or a sneak attack. As with great swing, the war hulk must have line of effect from one square to the next. Massive Swing (Ex): A 10th-level war hulk can lash out all around himself with a single attack. Massive swing works like mighty swing, except that its effect is not limited to three squares. The war hulk’s swing affects all squares he threatens.

Illus. by A. Smith

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

WARCHIEF

A warchief leads a primitive, aggressive tribe of humanoids, especially when they turn to marauding. The warchief calls on his indomitable presence and terrible visage to spur his followers to feats of great courage and sacrifice for the tribe. The tribe member who hangs back learns firsthand that the warchief ’s displeasure is a terror eclipsing even the hardships of war— better to die in glory on the battlefield than under the warchief ’s torturous punishments. Inspired into a killing frenzy, the warchief and his band sweep the enemies of the tribe before their onslaught. Warchiefs are self-made leaders, more often than not reaching their elevated status by deposing the previous warchief in a bloody coup. A warchief doesn’t become the sole authority by worrying about the needs of others, and thus good-aligned leaders are rarely members of this class. The martial classes—especially fighter, ranger, and warrior—are most likely to become warchiefs. NPC warchiefs might be found throughout the savage lands, leading tribes of brutal humanoids to bloody ends. Luckily for those in civilized lands, warchiefs most often array their followers against other warring bands of savages. Hit Die: d10.

Weapon and Armor Proficiency: Warchiefs gain no proficiency with any weapon or armor. Tribal Frenzy (Ex): A warchief is able to inspire his followers to acts of extreme battle frenzy. The warchief may activate this frenzy as a standard action. He may then maintain it as a free action. It ends at the conclusion of any turn in which the warchief does not maintain it. The frenzy affects any creature that is a member of the warshief ’s race and tribe, that starts its turn within 30 feet of the warchief, and that is able to hear the warchief. The frenzy grants a +2 enhancement bonus to the Strength score of each affected ally (not including the warchief himself ). At the start of each of their turns, everyone affected by the Strength boost takes 1 point of damage for each Hit Die they have. Thus, an orc warchief can grant +2 Strength to each member of the pack of 1stlevel orc warriors he commands, but they each take 1 point of damage per round as long as the Strength boost remains in effect. Every two levels (3rd, 5th, 7th, and 9th), the bonus to Strength increases by +2. Ability Boost (Ex): As a warchief gains levels in this prestige class, his Charisma score increases as noted on Table 1–13: The Warchief. These increases stack. Devoted Bodyguards (Ex): Beginning at 8th level, once per round, whenever a warchief is hit by an attack, he may make a DC 15 Reflex save to have that attack affect an adjacent tribe member instead. The attack is treated as though it had hit the chosen bodyguard instead of the leader, regardless of the bodyguard’s Armor Class or any other defensive effects. A tribe member may not serve as a bodyguard if it is dazed, stunned, paralyzed, or otherwise unable to act.

REQUIREMENTS To qualify to become a warchief, a character must fulfill all the following criteria. Base Attack Bonus: +3. Special: Must have led a tribe in battle.

CLASS SKILLS The warchief ’s class skills (and the key ability for each skill) are Bluff (Cha), Climb (Str), Craft (Int), Diplomacy (Cha), Handle Animal (Cha), Intimidate (Cha), Jump (Str), Ride (Dex), Sense Motive (Wis), and Swim (Str). Skill Points at Each Level: 2 + Int modifier.

Table 1–13: The Warchief Level 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8th 9th 10th

Base Attack Bonus +0 +1 +2 +3 +3 +4 +5 +6 +6 +7

Fort Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Ref Save +0 +0 +1 +1 +1 +2 +2 +2 +3 +3

Will Save +2 +3 +3 +4 +4 +5 +5 +6 +6 +7

Special Tribal frenzy (Str +2) Ability boost (Cha +2) Tribal frenzy (Str +4) — Tribal frenzy (Str +6) Ability boost (Cha +2) Tribal frenzy (Str +8) Devoted bodyguards Tribal frenzy (Str +10) Ability boost (Cha +2)

CLASS FEATURES

24

All of the following are class features of the warchief.

A troglodyte warchief

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:40 PM Page 25

FEATS

On the battlefield, combatants continually vie to develop new techniques that will give them a decisive edge over their opponents. These feats deal mostly with tactical combat.

SUDDEN METAMAGIC FEATS

CHAPTER 1:

CHARACTERS

Sudden metamagic feats are a new kind of metamagic feat. You choose whether to apply a sudden metamagic feat to a spell as you cast the spell. You can apply a sudden metamagic feat to a spell of any level, and it does not affect the spell’s level for the purpose of determining which spell slot it occupies. You can apply a sudden metamagic feat to a spell that has already been enhanced by a regular metamagic feat. However, the sudden metamagic feat cannot be of the same type as the regular metamagic feat (for instance, you can’t use Sudden Extend on a spell that has already been extended). A sudden metamagic feat doesn’t require a full-round action from casters who choose spells as they cast them, such as sorcerers and bards.

Human Wanderer

FEAT DESCRIPTIONS These feat descriptions follow the standard format.

Battlefield Inspiration [General]

Danger Sense [General] You are one twitchy mother goose. Prerequisite: Improved Initiative. Benefit: Once per day, you may reroll an initiative check you have just made. You may use the better of your two rolls. You must decide to reroll before the round starts.

Dash [General] You can move faster than normal. Benefit: If you are wearing light armor or no armor and are carrying a light load, your speed is 5 feet faster.

Daunting Presence [General] You are skilled at inducing fear in your opponents. Prerequisites: Cha 13, base attack bonus +1. Benefit: You may take a standard action to overawe an opponent. The opponent must be within 30 feet, have line of sight to you, and have an Intelligence score. If the opponent fails a Will saving throw (DC 10 + 1/2 your character level + your Cha modifier), the opponent is shaken for 10 minutes. This feat has no affect on a creature that is already shaken. Special: A fighter may select Daunting Presence as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Deft Opportunist [General] You are prepared for the unexpected. Prerequisites: Dex 15, Combat Reflexes. Benefit: You get a +4 bonus on attack rolls when making attacks of opportunity.

Distracting Attack [General] You are skilled at interfering with opponents in melee. Prerequisite: Base attack bonus +1. Benefit: When you make a melee attack against a creature, whether you are successful or not, all other creatures get a +1 circ*mstance bonus on attack rolls against that creature until the start of your next turn. Special: A fighter may select Distracting Attack as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Illus. by S. Tappin

You inspire courage in your allies. Prerequisite: Cha 13. Benefit: As a free action, you can inspire courage in your allies. Each ally within 30 feet of you (not including you) that can hear you and has an Intelligence of 3 or higher gains a +2 circ*mstance bonus on saving throws against fear effects. Special: You may select this feat multiple times. Its effects stack. Each time you take the feat, your bonus increases by +2.

Double Hit [General] You can react with your off hand to make an additional attack along with an attack of opportunity. Prerequisites: Combat Reflexes, Two-Weapon Fighting, Improved Two-Weapon Fighting. Benefit: When making an attack of opportunity, you may make an attack with your off hand against the same target at the same time. You must decide before your first attack roll whether you want to also use your off hand. If you do, both attacks take the standard penalties for fighting with two weapons. Special: A fighter may select Double Hit as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Energy Affinity [Metamagic] You can modify a spell that uses one type of energy to use another type (acid, cold, electricity, or fire) instead. Prerequisites: Knowledge (arcana) 5 ranks, able to cast at least one spell of each of these energy types: acid, cold, electricity, and fire. Benefit: Choose acid, cold, electricity, or fire. You can modify any spell with an energy descriptor to use the chosen type of energy instead. A spell so modified works normally in all respects except the type of damage dealt. A modified spell uses a spell slot of the spell’s normal level, modified by any other metamagic feats. Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Each time you take the feat, it applies to a different type of energy.

25

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:40 PM Page 26

CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

Table 1–14: Feats General Feats Battlefield Inspiration Danger Sense Dash Daunting Presence Deft Opportunist Distracting Attack

Prerequisites Cha 13 Improved Initiative — Cha 13, base attack bonus +1 Dex 15, Combat Reflexes Base attack bonus +1

Double Hit

Combat Reflexes, Improved Two-Weapon Fighting, Two-Weapon Fighting Wis 15, access to one domain spell Base attack bonus +4, sneak attack +1d6 Cha 13, base attack bonus +1 Quick Draw, base attack bonus +6 Spellcraft 2 ranks, base attack bonus +3

Extra Domain Spell Foe Specialist Goad Hurling Charge Mage Slayer Martial Throw Mounted Casting Powerful Charge Greater Powerful Charge Pushback Reckless Charge Second Wind Shieldmate Improved Shieldmate Sidestep Metamagic Feats Energy Affinity

Sudden Empower Sudden Energy Affinity Sudden Enlarge Sudden Extend Sudden Maximize Sudden Quicken

Sudden Silent Sudden Still Sudden Widen

Cast one of your domain spells an extra time +1d6 sneak attack damage against one creature type Goad enemy to make melee attacks only against you Throw a weapon as part of a charge +1 bonus on Will saves; spellcasters you threaten cannot cast defensively Special grapple to switch places with enemy +10 on Concentration checks to cast while mounted Extra damage when you charge Additional extra damage when you charge

Dex 17, Improved Unarmed Strike Ride 1 rank, Mounted Combat Medium or larger, base attack bonus +1 Medium or larger, Powerful Charge, base attack bonus +4 Str 17, Improved Bull Rush, Power Attack Base attack bonus +1 — Base attack bonus +1 Shieldmate, base attack bonus +4 Dex 15, Tumble 8 ranks, Dodge, Mobility

Push enemy back after melee attack Charges get +4 on attack rolls, but –4 penalty to AC Heal hit points equal to Con modifier 1/day Your shield grants shield bonus to adjacent allies Bonus from Shieldmate increases by +1 Gain 5-foot step after making attack of opportunity

Prerequisites Knowledge (arcana) 5 ranks, ability to cast at least one spell each of acid, cold, electricity, and fire energy types Any metamagic feat Energy Affinity — — Any metamagic feat Quicken Spell, Sudden Empower,, Sudden Extend, Sudden Maximize, Sudden Silent, Sudden Still — — —

Extra Domain Spell [General] You have chosen to be more specialized in a particular domain. Prerequisite: Wis 15, access to one domain spell. Benefit: Choose one domain spell that you can cast. You may cast this spell one extra time each day. Once this spell is chosen, it may not be changed. Special: You may take this feat multiple times. Each time you choose this feat, you select a different domain spell to which it applies.

Foe Specialist [General]

26

Benefit Allies get +2 bonus on saves against fear effects Reroll initiative once per day Speed increases by 5 feet Overawe enemy to make it shaken +4 on attack roll when making attack of opportunity Your attack gives +1 bonus on other creatures’ attacks against same target Gain off-hand attack when making attack of opportunity

You are trained at how to damage a particular type of foe. Prerequisites: Sneak attack +1d6, base attack bonus +4. Benefit: Choose a type of creature from Table 3–14: Ranger Favored Enemies, page 47 of the Player’s Handbook. You deal an extra 1d6 points of damage on successful sneak attacks against that type of creature. (The selected type cannot be construct, elemental, ooze, plant, or undead, since those types are not subject to critical hits.) Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Its effects do not stack. Each time you take the feat, it applies to a new creature type from among those that remain eligible.

Benefit Change the energy type of a spell

Empower spell without special preparation1/day Substitute spell energy without special preparation 1/day Enlarge spell without special preparation 1/day Extend spell without special preparation 1/day Maximize spell without special preparation 1/day Quicken spell without special preparation 1/day

Silence spell without special preparation 1/day Still spell without special preparation 1/day Widen spell without special preparation 1/day

Goad [General] You are skilled at inducing opponents to attack you. Prerequisites: Cha 13, base attack bonus +1. Benefit: As a move action, you may goad an opponent that threatens you, has line of sight to you, can hear you, and has an Intelligence of 3 or higher. (The goad is a mind-affecting effect.) When the goaded opponent starts its next turn, if it threatens you and has line of sight to you, it must make a Will saving throw (DC 10 + 1/2 your character level + your Cha modifier). If the opponent fails its save, you are the only creature it can make melee attacks against during this turn. (If it kills you, knocks you unconscious, loses sight of you, or otherwise is unable to make melee attacks against you, it may make any remaining melee attacks against other foes, as normal.) A goaded creature may still cast spells, make ranged attacks, move, or perform other actions normally. The use of this feat restricts only melee attacks. Special: A fighter may select Goad as one of his fighter bonus feats.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:40 PM Page 27

Greater Powerful Charge [General] You can charge with extra force. Prerequisites: Medium or larger, Powerful Charge, base attack bonus +4. Benefit: As Powerful Charge, but treat yourself as one size category larger than you are. For Colossal creatures, the extra 6d6 points of damage bonus becomes 8d6. Special: A fighter may select Greater Powerful Charge as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Improved Shieldmate [General] You have an outstanding ability to protect those near you with your shield. Prerequisites: Shieldmate, base attack bonus +4. Benefit: As Shieldmate, except that the bonus is +2, or +3 if you are using a tower shield. Special: A fighter may select Improved Shieldmate as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Mage Slayer [General] You have studied the ways and weaknesses of spellcasters and can time your attacks and defenses against them expertly. Prerequisites: Spellcraft 2 ranks, base attack bonus +3. Benefit: You gain a +1 bonus on all Will saving throws. Spellcasters you threaten may not cast defensively. (They automatically fail Concentration checks to do so.)

Martial Throw [General] You can switch positions with an opponent you hit in melee by throwing that opponent. Prerequisites: Dex 17, Improved Unarmed Strike. Benefit: When you are adjacent to an opponent of your size category or smaller and you hit that opponent with an unarmed strike, you may immediately make a special opposed grapple check against that opponent. Make a grapple check using your Dexterity modifier instead of your Strength modifier. The opponent uses its Strength modifier as normal. If you succeed, you and your opponent are not grappling, but you switch positions with the foe. (If either combatant occupies more than one square, both must end up adjacent to each other after the throw, each must occupy at least one square the other formerly occupied, and neither can be located in a square occupied by any obstacle or other creature. If both combatants can’t meet these conditions, you can’t execute the throw.)

Mounted Casting [General] You are skilled at casting spells while riding a mount. Prerequisites: Ride 1 rank, Mounted Combat. Benefit: You gain a +10 bonus on Concentration checks to cast spells while mounted.

CHARACTERS

You are trained in using thrown weapons as part of a charge attack Prerequisites: Quick Draw, base attack bonus +6. Benefit: If you charge an opponent, you may make a ranged attack with a thrown weapon as well as a melee attack with another weapon that you draw during the charge. You may use this feat only if you have a throwing weapon in hand at the start of your turn. Both attacks must be made at the same opponent, and both receive the bonus on attack rolls for making a charge. (If you kill the enemy you’re charging with the thrown weapon, you complete the charge but don’t get a melee attack.) You must also follow all the requirements of making a charge. If you have the ability to make multiple attacks on a charge, you may make only one attack in addition to the thrown weapon attack. You still take the normal –2 penalty to Armor Class for making a charge attack. Special: A fighter may select Hurling Charge as one of his fighter bonus feats.

CHAPTER 1:

Hurling Charge [General]

Switching positions in this fashion does not provoke attacks of opportunity. You can use this feat on allies as well as enemies. If the other character is willing, your attack roll and grapple check are automatically successful, and you deal unarmed strike damage to your ally normally. (This move is a hard, violent throw, and you can’t pull it off without actually striking the subject of the throw.) This feat can be used only once per round. Special: A fighter may select this feat as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Powerful Charge [General] You can charge with extra force. Prerequisites: Medium or larger, base attack bonus +1. Benefit: When you charge, if your melee attack hits, it deals an extra 1d8 points of damage (if you’re Medium). For Large creatures, the extra damage is 2d6; for Huge, 3d6; for Gargantuan, 4d6; and for Colossal, 6d6. This feat works only when you make a charge. It does not work when you’re mounted. If you have the ability to make multiple attacks on a charge, you may apply this extra damage to only one of those attacks in a round. Special: A fighter may select Powerful Charge as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Pushback [General] You can knock opponents back when you hit them in melee. Prerequisites: Str 17, Improved Bull Rush, Power Attack. Benefit: When you are adjacent to an opponent of your size category or smaller and you hit that opponent with a melee attack, you may immediately make a special bull rush attempt against that opponent. If you succeed, you push the opponent back 5 feet (only) and move into the square (or one of the squares) previously occupied by that opponent. You choose whether the opponent moves one square straight back, one square diagonally back to the right, or one square diagonally back to the left. You can’t push an opponent back through (or into) solid obstacles or otherwise occupied squares. If, after making the bull rush attempt, you would not be able to move into a square previously occupied by the opponent, you can’t push that opponent back. This feat can be used once per round. The movement caused by the use of this feat does not provoke attacks of opportunity. Special: A fighter may select Pushback as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Reckless Charge [General] You can charge with wild abandon. Prerequisite: Base attack bonus +1. Benefit: When you charge, before making your attack roll, you may choose to take a –4 penalty to Armor Class until the start of your next turn to gain a +4 bonus on your attack roll. Normal: Without this feat, a charging character gains a +2 bonus on his attack roll and a –2 penalty to Armor Class until the start of his next turn.

27

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:40 PM Page 28

Special: A fighter may select Reckless Charge as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Second Wind [General] You can shrug off minor wounds with ease. Benefit: Once per day, as a free action, you can heal yourself of a number of points of damage equal to your Constitution modifier (minimum 1).

Shieldmate [General] CHARACTERS

CHAPTER 1:

You can protect those near you with your shield. Prerequisite: Base attack bonus +1. Benefit: When you are using a shield with which you are proficient, friendly creatures adjacent to you get a +1 shield bonus to their Armor Class. If you are using a tower shield, those creatures get a +2 shield bonus. The creatures lose the bonus if they are no longer adjacent to you, if you’re grappling, or if you’re stunned, paralyzed, or otherwise unable to take actions. This shield bonus doesn’t stack with other shield bonuses the allied creatures may have. Special: A fighter may select Shieldmate as one of his fighter bonus feats.

Illus. by D. Hanley

Sidestep [General] You can move nimbly around the battlefield. Prerequisites: Dex 15, Tumble 8 ranks, Dodge, Mobility. Benefit: Once per round, when you make an attack of opportunity, you may take a 5foot step after you attack. This 5-foot step doesn’t count against your limit of one 5-foot step per round or against any movement you take on your turn.

Sudden Empower [Metamagic] You can cast one spell per day to greater effect without special preparation. Prerequisite: Any metamagic feat. Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Empower Spell feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Empower Spell feat normally, if you have it.

Sudden Energy Affinity [Metamagic] You can modify a spell’s energy type once per day without special preparation. Prerequisite: Energy Affinity. Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Energy Affinity feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Energy Affinity feat normally. Special: You can gain this feat multiple times. Each time it applies to a different type of energy.

Sudden Enlarge [Metamagic] You may cast one spell per day with a greater range than normal without special preparation.

28

Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Enlarge Spell feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Enlarge Spell feat normally, if you have it.

Sudden Extend [Metamagic] You can cast one spell per day with a longer duration than normal without special preparation. Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Extend Spell feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Extend Spell feat normally, if you have it.

Sudden Maximize [Metamagic] Once per day you can cast a spell to maximum effect without special preparation. Prerequisite: Any metamagic feat. Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Maximize Spell feat to any spell you cast, Elf Bladesinger without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Maximize Spell feat normally, if you have it.

Sudden Quicken [Metamagic] Once per day you can cast a spell with a moment’s thought without special preparation. Prerequisites: Quicken Spell, Sudden Empower, Sudden Extend, Sudden Maximize, Sudden Silent, Sudden Still. Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Quicken Spell feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Quicken Spell feat normally.

Sudden Silent [Metamagic] Once per day you can cast a spell silently without special preparation. Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Silent Spell feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Silent Spell feat normally, if you have it. Sudden Still [Metamagic] Once per day you can cast a spell without gestures without special preparation. Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Still Spell feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Still Spell feat normally, if you have it. Sudden Widen [Metamagic] Once per day you can increase the area of a spell without special preparation. Benefit: Once per day, you may apply the Widen Spell feat to any spell you cast, without increasing the level of the spell or specially preparing it ahead of time. You may still use the Widen Spell feat normally, if you have it.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:41 PM Page 29

Illus. by D. Hanley

hen troops march into battle, they rely on spellcasters to sharpen their steel, weaken the enemy, and heal their casualties. Spellcasters of all types are constantly refining their craft—the better to dominate the battlefield. Described here are spells created to achieve victory in military engagements large and small. This chapter also includes new magic items.

THE SWIFT ACTION

As a supplement to the action types described in Chapter 8 of the Player’s Handbook (standard, move, full-round, and free), this chapter introduces a new type of action: the swift action. A swift action consumes a very small amount of time, but represents a larger expenditure of effort and energy than is the case with a free action. You can perform one swift action per turn, without affecting your ability to perform other actions. In that regard, a swift action is like a free action. However, you may perform only a single swift action per turn, regardless of what other actions you take. You may take a swift action any time you would normally be allowed to take a free action. Swift actions usually involve magic or the activation of magic items; many characters (especially those who don’t use magic) will never have an opportunity to take swift actions. Casting a quickened spell is a swift action. Casting feather fall is a swift action. (Feather fall is a unique spell, however, in that it can be cast even when it isn’t your turn. This isn’t generally true of swift actions, which are normally taken on your turn like

other types of actions.) In addition, casting any spell with a casting time of 1 swift action is a swift action. Casting a spell with a casting time of 1 swift action does not provoke attacks of opportunity.

SPELL NOTES

Two types of spells described in this chapter warrant a bit of special discussion.

SWIFT-ACTION SPELLS Several spells presented here, in particular those with “swift” in the title, are cast as swift actions and last only 1 round. In the spell lists that begin on the following page, a swift-action spell is denoted by “swift” in parentheses at the end of the spell’s brief description. A spell with a casting time of 1 swift action can be cast only during your own turn unless the spell description specifically indicates otherwise. Activating a spell completion item, activating a spell trigger item, or drinking a potion is a standard action. This is true even if the spell from which the scroll, potion, or item is made can be cast as a swift action. In other words, it takes a standard action to drink a potion of swift expeditious retreat, even though casting the spell itself requires only a swift action.

LEGION SPELLS A number of spells in this chapter, many of them with “legion’s” in the title, are spells developed

29

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 3:41 PM Page 30

2nd-Level Bard Spells Curse of Impending Blades: Subject takes –2 penalty to AC. Fly, Swift: You fly for 1 round (swift). Invisibility, Swift: Invisibility lasts 1 round (swift). Undeniable Gravity: Flying creature loses flying ability.

3rd-Level Bard Spells Curse of Impending Blades, Legion’s: Subjects take –2 penalty to AC.

CHAPTER 2:

4th-Level Bard Spells

MAGIC

Undeniable Gravity, Legion’s: Flying creatures lose flying ability.

CLERIC SPELLS 1st-Level Cleric Spells Conviction: Subject gains +2 or higher save bonus. Favorable Sacrifice: Subject gains better protection the more gems you sacrifice. Guiding Light: +1 on ranged attacks against creatures in illuminated area. Incite: Subject can’t ready actions or delay. Inhibit: Subject delays until next round. Sign: Your initiative check result improves, and you know enemies’ initiative check results. Cleric of Nerull illus. by S. Tappin Cleric of Moradin illus. by D. Hanley

Cleric of Nerull

2nd-Level Cleric Spells especially for the battlefield. In general, such spells are effective out to medium range, and they affect allies or enemies in a 20-foot-radius burst. When troops are massed into units for large battles, these spells are useful for benefiting or hampering entire units.

Divine Protection: Allies gain +1 to AC, saves. Living Undeath: Subject becomes immune to critical hits and sneak attacks. Quick March: Allies’ speed increases by 30 ft. for 1 round. Veil of Shadow: Darkness grants you concealment.

SPELL LISTS

These lists summarize the spells described here.

ASSASSIN SPELLS Cleric of Moradin

1st-Level Assassin Spells Lightfoot: Your move does not provoke attacks of opportunity for 1 round (swift).

2nd-Level Assassin Spells Invisibility, Swift: Invisibility lasts 1 round (swift). Veil of Shadow: Darkness grants you concealment.

BLACKGUARD SPELLS 2nd-Level Blackguard Spells Veil of Shadow: Darkness grants you concealment.

3rd-Level Blackguard Spells Demonhide: Evil creature gains DR 10/cold iron and good.

BARD SPELLS 1st-Level Bard Spells

30

Expeditious Retreat, Swift: Your speed increases by 30 ft. for 1 round (swift). Incite: Subject can’t ready actions or delay. Inhibit: Subject delays until next round.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:03 PM Page 31

3rd-Level Cleric Spells

CHAPTER 2:

Close Wounds: Cure 2d4 damage, even on another’s turn (swift). Conviction, Legion’s: Allies gain +2 or higher save bonus. Curse of Petty Failing: Subject takes –2 penalty on attack rolls and saves. Delay Death: Losing hit points doesn’t kill subject. Ring of Blades: Blades surround you, damaging other creatures (1d6+1/level damage). Slashing Darkness: Ray deals 1d8/two levels damage and heals undead the same amount.

MAGIC

4th-Level Cleric Spells Aid, Legion’s: Allies gain +1 on attack rolls, +1 against fear, 1d8 temporary hp +1/level (max +20). Align Weapon, Legion’s: Allies’ weapons become good, evil, lawful, or chaotic. Panacea: Removes most afflictions. Shield of Faith, Legion’s: Allies gain +3 or higher AC bonus.

5th-Level Cleric Spells Curse of Petty Failing, Legion’s: Enemies take –2 penalty on attack rolls and saves. Revivify: Restore recently dead to life with no level loss.

Orc Druid

DRUID SPELLS 1st-Level Druid Spells Snake’s Swiftness: Subject immediately makes one attack. Snake’s Swiftness, Legion’s: Allies each immediately make one attack. Tiger’s Tooth: One natural weapon of subject gets +1/four levels on attack and damage rolls (max +5) for 1 round (swift).

PALADIN SPELLS 1st-Level Paladin Spells Bless Weapon, Swift: Weapon strikes true against evil foes for 1 round (swift). Lionheart: Subject gains immunity to fear.

Illus. by D. Hanley

2nd-Level Druid Spells

3rd-Level Druid Spells Align Fang: Natural weapon becomes good, evil, lawful, or chaotic. Fly, Swift: You fly for 1 round (swift). Lion’s Charge: You can make a full attack on a charge for 1 round (swift).

2nd-Level Paladin Spells Holy Spurs: Special mount’s speed increases by 40 ft. for 1 round (swift). Divine Protection: Allies gain +1 to AC, saves. Quick March: Allies’ speed increases by 30 ft. for 1 round. Righteous Fury: Subject deals double damage on charges.

4th-Level Druid Spells Arc of Lightning: Line of electricity between two creatures (1d6/level damage).

5th-Level Druid Spells Align Fang, Legion’s: Allies’ natural weapons become good, evil, lawful, or chaotic Panacea: Removes most afflictions.

HEALER SPELLS

3rd-Level Paladin Spells Angelskin: Lawful good creature gains DR 10/silver and evil.

4th-Level Paladin Spells Righteous Aura: You detonate on death, healing good creatures and damaging others (2d6/level damage).

RANGER SPELLS 1st-Level Ranger Spells

3rd-Level Healer Spells Close Wounds: Cure 2d4 damage, even on another’s turn (swift).

Guided Arrow: Ranged attack targets don’t get cover for 1 round (swift). Lightfoot: Your move does not provoke attacks of opportunity for 1 round (swift).

4th-Level Healer Spells Panacea: Removes most afflictions.

5th-Level Healer Spells Revivify: Restore recently dead to life with no level loss.

2nd-Level Ranger Spells Blades of Fire: Your melee weapons deal +1d6 fire damage for 1 round (swift). Curse of Impending Blades: Subject takes –2 penalty to AC. Haste, Swift: You are hasted for 1 round (swift).

31

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:03 PM Page 32

3rd-Level Ranger Spells Curse of Impending Blades, Legion’s: Enemies take –2 penalty to AC.

4th-Level Ranger Spells Lion’s Charge: You can make a full attack on a charge for 1 round (swift).

Nebin, Gnome Illusionist

SORCERER/WIZARD SPELLS CHAPTER 2:

0-Level Sorcerer/Wizard Spells (Cantrips)

MAGIC

Trans

Repair Minor Damage: “Cures” 1 point of damage to a construct.

1st-Level Sorcerer/Wizard Spells Conj

Ench

Illus. by D. Hanley

Evoc

Trans

Acid Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d8 or more acid damage. Benign Transposition:Two willing subjects switch places. Cold Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d8 or more cold damage. Electric Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d8 or more electricity damage. Fire Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d8 or more fire damage. Sonic Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d6 or more sonic damage. Incite: Subject can’t ready actions or delay. Inhibit: Subject delays until next round. Guiding Light: +1 on ranged attacks against creatures in illuminated area. Mordenkainen’s Buzzing Bee: Bee gives subject –10 penalty on Move Silently and Concentration checks. Repair Light Damage: “Cures” 1d8+1/level (max +5) points of damage to a construct. Slide: Move subject 5 feet.

2nd-Level Sorcerer/Wizard Spells Conj Evoc

Necro Trans

Baleful Transposition: Two subjects switch places. Blades of Fire: Your melee weapons deal +1d6 fire damage for 1 round (swift). Bigby’s Slapping Hand: Hand makes creature provoke attacks of opportunity. Fireburst: Adjacent subjects take 1d8/level fire damage. Veil of Shadow: Darkness grants you concealment. Curse of Impending Blades: Subject takes –2 penalty to AC. Repair Moderate Damage: “Cures” 2d8+1/level (max +10) points of damage to a construct. Slide, Greater: Move subject 20 feet. Snake’s Swiftness: Subject immediately makes one attack. Undeniable Gravity: Flying creature loses flying ability.

Elf Pyromancer

3rd-Level Sorcerer/Wizard Spells Necro Trans

Curse of Impending Blades, Legion’s: Enemies take –2 penalty to AC. Repair Serious Damage: “Cures” 3d8+1/level (max +15) points of damage to a construct. Snake’s Swiftness, Legion’s: Allies each immediately make one attack.

4th-Level Sorcerer/Wizard Spells Conj Trans

Blast of Flame: 60-ft. cone of fire (1d6/level damage). Repair Critical Damage: “Cures” 4d8+1/level (max +20) points of damage to a construct. Undeniable Gravity, Legion’s: Flying creatures lose flying ability.

5th-Level Sorcerer/Wizard Spells Conj

32

Arc of Lightning: Line of electricity between two creatures (1d6/level damage).

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:04 PM Page 33

Evoc

Fire Shield, Legion’s: Creatures attacking allies take damage; allies are protected from fire or cold. Fireburst, Greater: Subjects within 10 ft. take 1d8/level fire damage.

Fireburst: Adjacent subjects take 1d8/level fire damage.

3rd-Level Warmage Spells Ring of Blades: Blades surround you, damaging other creatures (1d6+1/level damage).

WARMAGE SPELLS

4th-Level Warmage Spells 1st-Level Warmage Spells

Blast of Flame: 60-ft. cone of fire (1d6/level damage).

5th-Level Warmage Spells

Blades of Fire: Your melee weapons deal +1d6 fire damage for 1 round (swift).

MAGIC

2nd-Level Warmage Spells

Arc of Lightning: Line of electricity between two creatures (1d6/level damage). Fire Shield, Legion’s: Creatures attacking allies take damage; allies are protected from fire or cold. Fireburst, Greater: Subjects within 10 ft. take 1d8/level fire damage.

CHAPTER 2:

Acid Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d8 or more acid damage. Cold Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d8 or more cold damage. Electric Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d8 or more electricity damage. Fire Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d8 or more fire damage. Sonic Orb, Lesser: Ranged touch, 1d6 or more sonic damage.

SPELL DESCRIPTIONS The spells herein are presented in alphabetical order (with the exception of those whose names begin with “greater,” “legion’s,” “lesser,” or “swift”; see Order of Presentation, page 181 of the Player’s Handbook).

Acid Orb, Lesser Conjuration (Creation) [Acid] Level: Sor/Wiz 1, Wmg 1 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Effect: One orb of acid Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: No An orb of acid about 2 inches across shoots from your palm at its target, dealing 1d8 points of acid damage. You must succeed on a ranged touch attack to hit your target. For every two caster levels beyond 1st, your orb deals an additional 1d8 points of damage: 2d8 at 3rd level, 3d8 at 5th level, 4d8 at 7th level, and the maximum of 5d8 at 9th level or higher.

Align Fang Transmutation Level: Drd 3 Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Living creature touched Duration: 1 min./level Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) Align fang makes a creature’s natural weapons good-, evil-, lawful-, or chaoticaligned, as you choose. A natural weapon that is aligned can overcome the damage reduction of certain creatures, usually outsiders of the opposite alignment. This spell has no effect on a natural weapon that is already treated as being aligned, such as the claw or bite attack of most demons. You can’t cast this spell on a manufactured weapon, such as a sword. When you cast this spell to make a natural weapon good-, evil-, lawful-, or chaotic-aligned, align weapon is a good, evil, lawful, or chaotic spell, respectively.

Align Fang, Legion’s Aid, Legion’s Enchantment (Compulsion) [MindAffecting] Level: Clr 4 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allies in a 20-ft.-radius burst This spell functions like aid (see page 196 of the Player’s Handbook), except that it affects multiple allies at a distance and each ally gains temporary hit points equal to 1d8 + caster level (to a maximum of 1d8+20 temporary hit points at caster level 20th).

Transmutation Level: Drd 5 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allies in a 20-ft.-radius burst This spell functions like align fang, except that it affects multiple allies at a distance.

Align Weapon, Legion’s Transmutation [see text for align weapon] Level: Clr 4 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allies’ weapons in a 20-ft.radius burst

This spell functions like align weapon (see page 197 of the Player’s Handbook), except that it affects multiple weapons or projectiles at a distance.

Angelskin Abjuration [Good] Level: Pal 3 Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Lawful good creature touched Duration: 1 round/level Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) The subject gains damage reduction 10/evil and silver.

Arc of Lightning Conjuration (Creation) [Electricity] Level: Drd 4, Sor/Wiz 5, Wmg 5 Components: V, S, M/DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Area: A line between two creatures Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: Reflex half Spell Resistance: No You create natural conductivity between two creatures, and a bolt of electricity arcs between them. This bolt deals 1d6 points of electricity damage per caster level (maximum 15d6) to both creatures and to anything in the line between them. Both creatures must be in range, and you must be able to target them (as if this spell had them as its targets). Draw the line from any corner in one creature’s space to any corner in the other’s space. Arcane Material Component: Two small iron rods.

33

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:04 PM Page 34

MAGIC

CHAPTER 2:

Baleful Transposition Conjuration (Teleportation) Level: Sor/Wiz 2 Components: V Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Targets: Two creatures of up to Large size Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: Will negates Spell Resistance: Yes Two target creatures, of which you may be one, instantly swap positions. The creatures must be connected by a solid object, such as the ground, a bridge, or a rope. Both targets must be within range. Objects carried by the subject creatures (up to the creatures’ maximum loads) go with them, but other creatures do not, even if they are carried. The movement is instantaneous and does not provoke attacks of opportunity. If either creature succeeds on its Will save, the spell is negated.

from creatures threatening its square. The spell allows no saving throw, but the slapped creature can negate the effect with a successful DC 20 Concentration check. Focus: A leather glove.

Blades of Fire Conjuration [Fire] Level: Rgr 2, Sor/Wiz 2, Wmg 2 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Touch Targets: Up to two melee weapons you are wielding Duration: 1 round Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: No Flames sheathe your melee weapons, harming neither you nor the weapons but possibly burning your opponents. Your melee weapons each deal 1d6 points of extra fire damage. This damage stacks with any energy damage your weapon already deals.

Saving Throw: Will half (harmless); see text Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) This spell cures 2d4 points of damage. You can cast this spell with an instant utterance. You may even cast this spell when it isn’t your turn. If you cast this spell immediately after the subject takes damage, it effectively prevents the damage. It would keep alive someone who had just dropped to –10 hit points, for example, leaving the character at negative hit points but stable. Used against an undead creature, close wounds deals damage instead of curing the creature (which takes half damage if it makes a Will saving throw).

Cold Orb, Lesser Conjuration (Creation) [Cold] Level: Sor/Wiz 1, Wmg 1 Effect: One orb of cold This spell functions like lesser acid orb, except that it deals cold damage.

Benign Transposition Conjuration (Teleportation) Level: Sor/Wiz 1 Components: V Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Targets: Two willing creatures of up to Large size Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: No Two target creatures, of which you may be one, instantly swap positions. Both targets must be within range. Objects carried by the target creatures (up to the creatures’ maximum loads) go with them, but other creatures do not, even if they are carried. The movement is instantaneous and does not provoke attacks of opportunity.

Bigby’s Slapping Hand Evocation [Force] Level: Sor/Wiz 2 Components: V, S, F Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Effect: One Tiny hand Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: None (see text) Spell Resistance: Yes

34

Bigby’s slapping hand causes a magical hand to appear, deliver a slap to one creature, then disappear. The slap distracts the subject, causing it to immediately provoke attacks of opportunity

Blast of Flame

Conviction

Conjuration (Creation) [Fire] Level: Sor/Wiz 4, Wmg 4 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: 60 ft. Area: Cone-shaped burst Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: Reflex half Spell Resistance: No

Abjuration Level: Clr 1 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Creature touched Duration: 1 min./level Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless)

Flames fill the area, dealing 1d6 points of fire damage per caster level (maximum 10d6) to any creature in the area that fails its saving throw. Material Component: A bit of wick soaked in oil.

This spell bolsters the mental, physical, and spiritual strength of the creature touched. The spell grants the subject a +2 morale bonus on all saving throws, with an additional +1 to the bonus for every six caster levels you have (maximum +5 morale bonus at 18th level). Material Component: A small parchment with a bit of holy text written upon it.

Bless Weapon, Swift Transmutation Level: Pal 1 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Duration: 1 round This spell functions like bless weapon (see page 205 of the Player’s Handbook) except as noted above.

Conviction, Legion’s Abjuration Level: Clr 3 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allies in a 20-ft.-radius burst This spell functions like conviction, except that it affects multiple allies at a distance.

Close Wounds Conjuration (Healing) Level: Clr 3, Hlr 3 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Target: One creature Duration: Instantaneous

Curse of Impending Blades Necromancy Level: Brd 2, Rgr 2, Sor/Wiz 2 Components: V, S, M/DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Target: One creature

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:05 PM Page 35

Duration: 1 min./level Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: Yes

Drow Wizard

Divine Protection Enchantment (Compulsion) [MindAffecting] Level: Clr 2, Pal 2 Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allies in a 20-ft.-radius burst Duration: 1 min./level Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless)

Curse of Impending Blades, Legion’s Necromancy Level: Brd 3, Rgr 3, Sor/Wiz 3 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Enemies in a 20-ft.-radius burst This spell functions like curse of impending blades, except that it affects multiple enemies.

Allies gain a +1 morale bonus to their Armor Class and on saving throws.

Curse of Petty Failing

Electric Orb, Lesser

Curse of Petty Failing, Legion’s Necromancy Level: Clr 5 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Enemy creatures in a 20-ft.radius burst This spell functions like curse of petty failing, except that it affects multiple enemies out to medium range.

Delay Death Necromancy Level: Clr 3 Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Living creature touched Duration: 1 round/level

Conjuration (Creation) [Electricity] Level: Sor/Wiz 1, Wmg 1 Effect: One orb of electricity This spell functions like lesser acid orb, except that it deals electricity damage.

Expeditious Retreat, Swift Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) The subject of this powerful spell is unable to die from hit point damage. While under the protection of this spell, the normal limit of –9 hit points before a character dies is extended without limit. A condition or spell that destroys enough of the subject’s body so as to not allow raise dead to work, such as a disintegrate effect, still kills the creature, as does death brought about by ability score damage, level drain, or a death effect. The spell does not prevent the subject from entering the dying state by dropping to –1 hit points. It merely prevents death as a result of hit point loss. If the subject has fewer than –9 hit points when the spell’s duration expires, he or she dies instantly.

Demonhide Abjuration [Evil] Level: Blk 3

Illus. by D. Hanley

Necromancy Level: Clr 3 Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Target: One creature Duration: 1 min./level Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: Yes The subject takes a –2 penalty on attack rolls and saving throws. The curse cannot be dispelled, but it can be removed with a break enchantment, limited wish, miracle, remove curse, or wish spell.

CHAPTER 2:

The subject gains damage reduction 10/cold iron and good.

MAGIC

The subject of the spell has a hard time avoiding attacks, sometimes even seeming to stumble into harm’s way. The subject takes a –2 penalty to AC. The curse cannot be dispelled, but it can be removed with a break enchantment, limited wish, miracle, remove curse, or wish spell. Arcane Material Component: A nail through a piece of leather.

Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Evil creature touched Duration: 1 round/level Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless)

Transmutation Level: Brd 1 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Duration: 1 round This spell functions like expeditious retreat (see page 228 of the Player’s Handbook), except as noted above.

Favorable Sacrifice Abjuration Level: Clr 1 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Creature touched Duration: 1 hour/level Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) The subject receives the protection of a divine power commensurate with the value of the expended material component. Only one of the benefits listed below applies per casting of this spell; they do not stack.

35

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:05 PM Page 36

Sacrifice 1,000 gp

5,000 gp

MAGIC

CHAPTER 2:

25,000 gp

Benefit Damage reduction 10/magic; resistance to acid 10, cold 10, electricity 10, fire 10, sonic 10; spell resistance 10 Damage reduction 15/magic; resistance to acid 15, cold 15, electricity 15, fire 15, sonic 15; spell resistance 15 Damage reduction 20/magic; resistance to acid 20, cold 20, electricity 20, fire 20, sonic 20; spell resistance 20

Material Component: Gems worth a total of 1,000 gp, 5,000 gp, or 25,000 gp.

Fire Orb, Lesser Conjuration (Creation) [Fire] Level: Sor/Wiz 1, Wmg 1 Effect: One orb of fire This spell functions like lesser acid orb, except that it deals fire damage.

Fire Shield, Legion’s Evocation [Fire or Cold] Level: Sor/Wiz 5, Wmg 5 Components: V, S, M Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allied creatures in a 20-ft.radius burst This spell functions like fire shield (see page 230 of the Player’s Handbook), except as noted above.

Fireburst Evocation [Fire] Level: Sor/Wiz 2, Wmg 2 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: 5 ft. Effect: Burst of fire extending 5 ft. from you Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: Reflex half Spell Resistance: Yes Fireburst causes a powerful explosion of flame to burst from you, damaging anyone within 5 feet of you. All creatures within that area, except for you, take 1d8 points of fire damage per caster level (maximum 5d8). The burst does not affect you or any creatures or objects in your space. Material Component: A bit of sulfur.

This spell functions like fireburst, except that it affects creatures within 10 feet of you and deals a maximum of 15d8 points of damage to each one.

Fly, Swift Transmutation Level: Brd 2, Drd 3 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 round This spell functions like fly (see page 232 of the Player’s Handbook), except as noted above.

Guided Arrow Divination Level: Rgr 1 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 round Targets of your ranged attacks do not get bonuses to Armor Class because of cover. You still can’t hit creatures with total cover.

Guiding Light Evocation [Light] Level: Clr 1, Sor/Wiz 1 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Long (400 ft. + 40 ft./level) Targets: Creatures in a 5-ft.-radius burst Duration: 1 min./level (D) Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: Yes Light shines over the affected area, illuminating all targets within it. The light grants a +1 circ*mstance bonus on ranged attack rolls against any target in the area. Spellcasters in battle sometimes use this spell to designate targets for archers.

Haste, Swift Transmutation Level: Rgr 2 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Target: You Duration: 1 round

Fireburst, Greater Evocation [Fire] Level: Sor/Wiz 5, Wmg 5 Effect: Burst of fire extending 10 ft. from you

36

This spell functions as haste (see page 239 of the Player’s Handbook), except as noted above.

Holy Spurs Transmutation Level: Pal 2 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Target: Your special mount Duration: 1 round Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) This spell increases your special mount’s base land speed by 40 feet. This adjustment is treated as an enhancement bonus.

Incite Enchantment (Compulsion) [MindAffecting] Level: Brd 1, Clr 1, Sor/Wiz 1 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Target: One creature Duration: 1 min./level Saving Throw: Will negates Spell Resistance: Yes This spell incites the subject into acting. The subject is not allowed to delay or to ready an action. If the subject is currently delaying, it acts as soon as the spell is cast. If the subject currently has an action readied, it may act as normal but can’t later ready another action while the spell remains in effect.

Inhibit Enchantment (Compulsion) [MindAffecting] Level: Brd 1, Clr 1, Sor/Wiz 1 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Target: One creature Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: Will negates Spell Resistance: Yes The caster inhibits his foe from acting. The subject is forced to delay until the following round, acting immediately before the caster on the caster’s initiative count.

Invisibility, Swift Illusion (Glamer) Level: Asn2, Brd 2 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 round

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:05 PM Page 37

This spell functions like invisibility (see page 245 of the Player’s Handbook), except as noted above.

Lightfoot

Lionheart Abjuration [Mind-Affecting] Level: Pal 1 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Creature touched Duration: 1 round/level Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) The subject gains immunity to fear effects. Transmutation Level: Drd 3, Rgr 4 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 round

This spell causes a small but extremely loud bee to appear. It buzzes around the head of a creature you designate. (The creature must be within range, and you must be touching or be able to see the creature. Once you designate a creature, the bee stays with it; you cannot designate another creature.) The bee creates an unnerving noise that disrupts the subject’s concentration. The subject takes a –10 penalty on all Move Silently and Concentration checks. (Creatures that can’t hear don’t take the penalty on Concentration checks.) If the subject attempts to cast or

This spell grants you the pounce special ability (see page 313 of the Monster Manual).

Living Undeath Necromancy Level: Clr 2 Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Creature touched Duration: 1 min./level Saving Throw: Fortitude negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) This spell imparts a physical transformation upon the subject, not unlike the process that produces a zombie. While the subject does not actually become undead, its vital processes are temporarily bypassed with no seeming ill effect. The subject becomes not subject

Panacea Conjuration (Healing) Level: Clr 4, Drd 5, Hlr 4 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Creature touched Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: Will half (harmless); see text Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) This spell channels positive energy into a creature to wipe away afflictions. It immediately ends any of the following conditions affecting the target: blinded, confused, dazed, dazzled, deafened, diseased, exhausted, fatigued, frightened, nauseated, panicked, paralyzed, shaken, sickened, and stunned. It negates sleep effects and the effect of the feeblemind spell, and ends any additional effects from poison, as the neutralize poison spell. It also cures 1d8 points of damage + 1 point per caster level (up to +20). Panacea does not remove ability damage, negative levels, or permanently drained levels. It does not remove conditions caused by spells of 7th level or higher, or by spells or effects that cannot be dispelled. Used against an undead creature, panacea deals damage instead of curing the creature (which takes half damage if it makes a Will saving throw), but it has no other effect.

Illus. by D. Hanley

Lion’s Charge

Conjuration (Creation) Level: Sor/Wiz 1 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Effect: A phantom bee Duration: 1 min./level (D) Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: No

MAGIC

You move with unearthly agility. You provoke no attacks of opportunity when moving.

Mordenkainen’s Buzzing Bee

maintain a spell, it must make a DC 10 Concentration check even if there are no other distractions. The bee has a fly speed of 180 feet (perfect). It remains near the subject in spite of darkness, invisibility, polymorphing, cover, concealment, or any other attempt at disguising or hiding. The bee remains until the spell’s duration expires or the subject moves out of range. The bee can’t be attacked, but it can be dispelled. Material Component: A dab of honey.

CHAPTER 2:

Transmutation Level: Asn 1, Rgr 1 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 round

to sneak attacks and critical hits, just as undead are. While the spell is in effect, the subject takes a –4 penalty to its Charisma score (to a minimum of 1).

Quick March Drow Cleric of Lolth

Transmutation Level: Clr 2, Pal 2 Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allies in a 20-ft.-radius burst Duration: 1 round Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless)

37

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:06 PM Page 38

Quick march increases your allies’ base land speed by 30 feet. (This adjustment is considered an enhancement bonus.) There is no effect on other modes of movement, such as burrow, climb, fly, or swim. As with any effect that increases a creature’s speed, this spell affects maximum jumping distance.

Repair Critical Damage MAGIC

CHAPTER 2:

Transmutation Level: Sor/Wiz 4 As repair light damage, except repair critical damage repairs 4d8 points of damage +1 point per caster level (up to +20).

Repair Light Damage

Illus. by D. Hanley

Transmutation Level: Sor/Wiz 1 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Construct touched Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless)

Revivify Conjuration (Healing) Level: Clr 5, Hlr 5 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Dead creature touched Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: None; see text Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) Revivify miraculously restores life to a recently deceased creature. However, the spell must be cast within 1 round of the victim’s death. Before the soul of the deceased has completely left the body, this spell halts its journey while repairing somewhat the damage to the body. This spell functions like raise dead, except that the raised creature receives no level loss, no Constitution loss, and no loss of spells. The creature is only restored to –1 hit points (but is stable). Material Component: Diamonds worth at least 1,000 gp.

Righteous Aura

When laying your hands upon a construct that has at least 1 hit point remaining, you transmute its structure to repair damage it has taken. The spell repairs 1d8 points of damage + 1 point per caster level (up to +5).

Abjuration [Good, Light] Level: Pal 4 Components: V, S, DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 hour/level

Repair Minor Damage Transmutation Level: Sor/Wiz 0

Evocation [Good] Level: Pal 2 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Touch Target: Creature touched Duration: 1 round/level Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless) The subject’s charge attacks deal double damage. (The subject does not have to be mounted or wielding a lance.) If the subject makes more than one attack on a charge, the double damage applies only to the first attack. Conjuration Level: Clr 3, Wmg 3 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 min./level

Repair Moderate Damage Transmutation Level: Sor/Wiz 2 As repair light damage, except repair moderate damage repairs 2d8 points of damage + 1 point per caster level (up to +10).

Repair Serious Damage Transmutation Level: Sor/Wiz 3

38

Righteous Fury

Ring of Blades

As repair light damage, except repair minor damage repairs only 1 point of damage.

As repair light damage, except repair serious damage repairs 3d8 points of damage + 1 point per caster level (up to +15).

You are bathed in an unearthly glow for the duration of the spell (as if a daylight spell had been cast on you). You get a +4 sacred bonus to your Charisma score. If you die, your body is converted into an explosive blast of energy in a 20-footradius burst centered where you fell, dealing 2d6 points of damage per caster level (maximum 20d6) to all nongood creatures in the burst’s area. Good creatures in the area are healed by the same amount, and undead take double this damage. Spell resistance cannot prevent this damage, but a successful Reflex save reduces it to half. Your body is disintegrated, so you cannot be raised with a raise dead spell. Spells that do not require an intact body, such as true resurrection, can be used to bring you back to life as normal.

Cleric of Corellon Larethian

This spell conjures a ring of swirling metal blades around you. The ring extends 5 feet from you, into all squares adjacent to your space. Each round on your turn, starting when you cast the spell, the blades deal 1d6 points of damage + 1 point per caster level (up to a maximum of +10) to all creatures in the affected area. The blades conjured by a lawfulaligned cleric are cold iron, those conjured by a chaotic-aligned cleric are silver, and those conjured by cleric who is neither lawful nor chaotic are steel. Material Component: A small dagger.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/25/03 10:18 AM Page 39

Shield of Faith, Legion’s

This spell functions like slide, except that you can slide the subject creature 20 feet in a straight line.

Abjuration Level: Clr 4 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allied creatures in a 20-ft.-radius burst

Snake’s Swiftness

Sign Enchantment (Compulsion) [Mind-Affecting] Level: Clr 1 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 min./level

A drow cleric casts the slashing darkness spell.

Components: V Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Target: One creature Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: Will negates Spell Resistance: Yes

Illus. by A. Smith

You are granted a vision that shows you how your foes will act each round and allows you to respond quickly to them. When you cast this spell, you may set your initiative check result at 20 + your initiative modifier (but only if doing so increases the result). You know the initiative check results of all your foes while the spell is in effect, and you know which opponent will act first in case of ties. This spell applies to all foes in your line of sight. Material Component: A small piece of dried goat intestine or some tea leaves.

The subject may immediately make one melee or ranged attack, even if it has already taken its action for the round. Taking this action doesn’t affect the subject’s normal place in the initiative order. This is a single attack and follows the standard rules for attacking. This spell does not allow the subject to make more than one additional attack in a round. If the subject has already made an additional attack, due to a prior casting of this spell, from the haste spell, or from any other source, this spell fails. Arcane Material Component: A few scales from a snake.

MAGIC

This spell functions like shield of faith (see page 278 of the Player’s Handbook), except that it affects multiple allies at a distance.

CHAPTER 2:

Transmutation Level: Drd 1, Sor/Wiz 2 Components: V, S, M/DF Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels) Target: One creature Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: Will negates (harmless) Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless)

Snake’s Swiftness, Legion’s Slashing Darkness Evocation Level: Clr 3 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Effect: Ray Duration: Instantaneous Saving Throw: None Spell Resistance: Yes A hissing, hurtling ribbon of pure darkness flies from your hand. A creature struck by this ray of darkness takes 1d8 points of damage per two caster levels (maximum 5d8). An undead creature instead heals 1d8 points of damage per two caster levels (maximum 5d8).

Slide Transmutation Level: Sor/Wiz 1

You slide the subject creature along the ground a distance of 5 feet in any direction. (If the creature is flying or otherwise not on the ground, it moves parallel to the ground.) You can’t slide the subject into a space that is occupied by an ally, an enemy, or a solid object. (If you attempt to slide the subject into such a space, the spell automatically ends.) You can slide the subject fast enough to clear small gaps in the ground, such as narrow pits. You cannot slide the subject up or down, but you can slide it over the edge of a cliff or the like. This movement does not provoke attacks of opportunity.

Slide, Greater Transmutation Level: Sor/Wiz 2 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level)

Transmutation Level: Drd 2, Sor/Wiz 3 Range: Medium (100 ft. + 10 ft./level) Targets: Allied creatures in a 20-ft.radius burst This spell functions like snake’s swiftness, except that it affects multiple allies out to medium range.

Sonic Orb, Lesser Conjuration (Creation) [Fire] Level: Sor/Wiz 1, Wmg 1 Effect: One orb of sonic energy This spell functions like lesser acid orb, except that it deals from 1d6 to 5d6 points of sonic damage instead of 1d8 to 5d8 points of acid damage.

39

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:06 PM Page 40

Tiger’s Tooth

MAGIC

CHAPTER 2:

Transmutation Level: Drd 2 Components: V Casting Time: 1 swift action Range: Living creature touched Target: You Duration: 1 round This spell functions like greater magic fang (see page 250 of the Player’s Handbook), except as noted above.

Undeniable Gravity Transmutation Level: Brd 2, Sor/Wiz 2 Components: V, S, M Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Long (400 ft. + 40 ft./level) Target: One flying creature Duration: 1 min./level Saving Throw: Will negates Spell Resistance: Yes

A flying creature, which can be a creature that can fly by means of the fly spell or some similar magical effect, is grounded. If this spell is cast on a creature currently flying, that creature descends at a speed of 60 feet per round but does not fall (and thus is not subject to falling damage). The creature can still use its fly speed to move horizontally or down, but not up. Once it is on the ground, the subject can no longer use its fly speed. This spell does not affect incorporeal creatures. Material Component: A wing torn from a fly.

Undeniable Gravity, Legion’s Transmutation Level: Brd 4, Sor/Wiz 4 Range: Long (400 ft. + 40 ft./level) Targets: Creatures in a 20-ft.-radius burst

MAGIC ITEMS

Warlords intent on victory demand constant innovation from wizards and other spellcasters who create magic items for battle. Sometimes victory comes from crafting more powerful magic items. On the other hand, sometimes victory comes from crafting items of such ingenious simplicity that one can afford to outfit an entire warband with them. This section describes new magic items of various types. Several of these items require a swift action to activate. For more on swift actions, see the first page of this chapter.

MAGIC SHIELD SPECIAL ABILITY A shield with a special ability must have at least a +1 enhancement bonus. Paired: A shield with this special ability is ringed by a series of scales that lock into a mesh when brought in contact with an ally’s shield that possesses the same ability. The wielder of a paired shield gains a +1 enhancement bonus to Armor Class for every adjacent ally also wielding a paired shield. Faint abjuration; CL 5th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor; Price +1 bonus.

MAGIC WEAPON SPECIAL ABILITIES

40

A magic weapon with a special ability must have at least a +1 enhancement bonus. Deadly Precision: A weapon with this ability deals an extra 2d6 points of damage when its wielder makes a successful sneak attack. This ability does not bestow the ability to make sneak attacks upon a user who does not already have it. Strong enchantment; CL 12th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, keen edge; Price +2 bonus. Doom Burst: A cascade of blackness pours from this weapon when its wielder strikes true. On a successful critical hit, the weapon causes the victim to become shaken (no saving throw) for 5 minutes. This effect activates even if the creature struck is not subject to critical hits (roll to see if a critical hit occurs, then apply the shaken effect if appropriate). A creature that is already shaken is not affected (aside from the critical hit damage).

This spell functions like undeniable gravity, except that it affects multiple creatures.

Veil of Shadow Evocation [Darkness] Level: Asn 2, Blk 2, Clr 2, Sor/Wiz 2 Components: V, S Casting Time: 1 standard action Range: Personal Target: You Duration: 1 min./level Swirling wisps of darkness obscure your form, granting you concealment. The 20% miss chance is active even if the attacker has darkvision. This spell effect is suppressed in daylight or in the area of a light spell of 3rd level or higher. See invisibility does not counter the veil of shadow’s concealment effect, but a true seeing spell does.

Faint necromancy; CL 5th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor; doom; Price +1 bonus. Fear Burst: A horrific vision of impending death rises out of the weapon when its wielder strikes true. On a successful critical hit, the weapon afflicts the target with cause fear (Will DC 11 negates). This effect activates even if the creature struck is not subject to critical hits (roll to see if a critical hit occurs, then apply the fear effect if appropriate), but it does not affect creatures immune to mind-affecting spells. Faint necromancy; CL 5th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor; cause fear; Price +1 bonus. Maiming: A weapon with this special ability twists and digs into the flesh of the creatures it strikes true. This weapon has a random multiplier for critical hits. If the weapon normally has a ×2 critical multiplier, roll 1d4 each time you successfully score a critical hit to determine your multiplier. For weapons with a ×3 multiplier, roll 1d6 to determine the new multiplier. For a ×4 multiplier, roll 1d8. Faint transmutation; CL 5th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, keen edge; Price +1 bonus. Paralytic Burst: A wave of green energy washes over the victim of this weapon when its wielder strikes true. On a successful critical hit, the weapon afflicts the target with hold monster (Will DC 17 negates). This effect activates even if the creature struck is not subject to critical hits (roll to see if a critical hit occurs, then apply the hold monster effect if appropriate). Moderate enchantment; CL 9th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, hold monster; Price +2 bonus.

pqs DROW AND VEIL OF SHADOW As an optional rule, the DM may decide that some (or all) drow have veil of shadow as a racial spell-like ability rather than darkness. In fact, some of the statistics given for drow miniatures (see Chapter 4: Stat Cards) take advantage of this optional rule. In some situations, veil of shadow is a more interesting ability than darkness—especially in miniatures battles, which slow down and are much less fun when darkness is in effect.

pqs

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:19 PM Page 41

Druid of Obad-Hai

CHAPTER 2:

MAGIC Illus. by D. Hanley

Prismatic Burst: A multicolored beam of light plays over the victim of this weapon when its wielder strikes true. On a successful critical hit, the weapon strikes the target with a prismatic spray effect (save DC 20). This effect activates even if the creature struck is not subject to critical hits (roll to see if a critical hit occurs, then apply the prismatic spray effect if appropriate). Strong evocation; CL 13th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, prismatic spray; Price +3 bonus. Slow Burst: A chill aura numbs this weapon’s victim when its wielder strikes true. On a successful critical hit, the weapon afflicts the target with a slow effect (Will DC 14 negates). This effect activates even if the creature struck is not subject to critical hits (roll to see if a critical hit occurs, then apply the slow effect if appropriate). Faint transmutation; CL 5th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, slow; Price +1 bonus. Sonic: Upon command, a sonic weapon is surrounded with waves of sound energy. The sonic energy does not harm the wielder. The effect remains until another command is given. A sonic weapon deals an extra 1d4 points of sonic damage on a successful hit. Bows, crossbows, and slings so crafted bestow the sonic energy upon their ammunition. Moderate evocation; CL 8th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, sound burst; Price +1 bonus. Sonic Burst: A sonic burst weapon functions as a sonic weapon that also explodes with sonic energy upon striking a successful critical hit. If the weapon normally has a ×2 critical multiplier, add an extra 1d8 points of sonic damage each time you successfully score a critical hit. For weapons with a ×3 multiplier, add 2d8 points of sonic damage; for a ×4 multiplier, add 3d8 points of sonic damage. Bows, crossbows, and slings so crafted bestow the sonic energy upon their ammunition. This effect activates even if the creature struck is not subject to critical hits (roll to see if a critical hit

occurs, then apply the extra damage if appropriate). Even if the sonic ability is not active, the weapon still deals its extra sonic damage on a successful critical hit. Strong evocation; CL 12th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, sound burst; Price +2 bonus.

Specific Weapons

Half-Elf Sorcerer

The following specific weapons are usually preconstructed with exactly the qualities described here. Bullet of Sound: If this +1 sling bullet strikes a foe, it blasts an area with a tremendous cacophony. Every creature within a 10-foot radius takes 1d8 points of sonic damage and must succeed on a DC 13 Fortitude saving throw to avoid being stunned for 1 round. Faint evocation; CL 3rd; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, sound burst; Price 196 gp. Crossbow of Reloading: An elegantly designed weapon, this +1 light crossbow is decorated with ancient symbols of wind and energy along its handle. Reloading this weapon is a free action instead of a move action. Moderate transmutation; CL 7th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, haste; Price 6,335 gp. Demonward: This weapon is a +1 holy greatsword made of cold iron.Demonward weapons were crafted for use in planar wars against terrifying opponents from the deepest pits of the underworld. They are scarred and notched from their frequent contact with demonic skin.

41

MAGIC

CHAPTER 2:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:19 PM Page 42

Moderate evocation [good]; CL 7th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, holy smite, creator must be good; Price 20,400 gp. Devilward: This weapon is a +1 holy greatsword made with alchemical silver. Devilward weapons were forged in heavenly fires to be used against pit fiends and similar powers of hell. The alchemical silver material of this weapon imposes a –1 penalty on its damage, effectively canceling the +1 enhancement bonus. Moderate evocation [good]; CL 7th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, holy smite, creator must be good; Price 18,480 gp. Living Chain: This weapon seems possessed of some basic form of sentience. When it is used on an attempt to trip an opponent, this +2 spiked chain coils around the victim’s limbs, adding a +4 bonus on the wielder’s Strength check to trip the opponent. This bonus is in addition to the normal benefits that chains get when attempting to trip. Moderate transmutation; CL 7th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, bull’s strength; Price 12,325 gp. Weapon of Transmutation: This plain-looking +1 longsword has been designed to deal with foes of any origin. After its wielder successfully hits a creature that has damage reduction (with the normal effects), over the next round the weapon transforms itself, taking on the properties required to overcome that creature’s damage reduction. The change takes effect at the beginning of your next turn. Once changed, the weapon overcomes that type of damage reduction for 10 rounds or until it strikes a creature with a different type of damage reduction (at which point it changes to overcome that type). If the creature struck has multiple types of damage reduction, the weapon overcomes all of them. If the creature gains a new type of damage reduction after initially being struck, such as from changing its form, the weapon must change before being able to overcome the new type. The weapon does not gain any other benefit of the properties it takes on, and it always deals its normal damage. Strong transmutation; CL 13th; Craft Magic Arms and Armor, limited wish; Price 50,315 gp.

RING DESCRIPTION Rings are coveted and useful magical items. One new ring is described here. Ring of Communication: Each of these silver rings is inscribed with the Draconic word for friendship. While a ring of communication is worn, the wearer can clearly hear anything said (even if whispered quietly) by anyone else within 1 mile who is wearing another ring of communication to whom the wearer is attuned. To become attuned, two or more ring of communication wearers need to touch their rings together and speak the command word. Any number of ring wearers can become attuned to one another, so long as they are all attuned together at the same time. The wearer remains attuned until he removes the ring (or until all other wearers to which he is attuned remove theirs) or attunes himself to a different ring wearer. Faint divination; CL 5th; Forge Ring, detect thoughts; Price 2,000 gp.

ROD DESCRIPTIONS

42

Rods represent might and power. A couple of standard rods are described below. Rod of Sliding: Small magnets are set into each end of this iron rod. Once per day, the wielder may target a creature up to 30 feet away. Upon command, the wielder can push the targeted creature 5 feet farther away into an unoccupied square, or she can pull the targeted creature 5 feet closer into an unoccupied square. This movement does not provoke attacks of opportunity.

An unwilling creature gets a DC 11 Will saving throw to negate the effect. Moderate transmutation; CL 9th; Craft Rod, slide*; Price: 7,200 gp. *New spell described earlier in this chapter. Rod of Transposition: Small bolts of light arc from one end to the other end of this rod. Once per day, the rod allows its wielder to exchange positions with another creature within 30 feet. An unwilling creature gets a DC 13 Will saving throw to negate the effect. Moderate conjuration; CL 7th; Craft Rod, baleful transposition*; Price 11,200 gp *New spell described earlier in this chapter.

WONDROUS ITEM DESCRIPTIONS Wondrous items come in many forms. Some new wondrous items are described below. Amulet of Fortune Prevailing: Blessed by ancient gods of luck, this amulet allows its wearer to change his fortune. Once per day, after the amulet’s wearer attempts a saving throw (but before it’s determined whether the save succeeded), he may choose to reroll the saving throw. He must use the second result even if it’s lower. The wearer can’t use this ability if he has already rerolled the saving throw because of another ability he possesses, nor can he use another ability he possesses to reroll the saving throw a second time. The amulet can be used only after it is worn continuously for 24 hours. If it is taken off, it becomes inactive until it is again donned and worn for a full 24 hours. Moderate divination; CL 9th; Craft Wondrous Item, augury; Price 8,000 gp. Belt of One Mighty Blow: Once per day, as a swift action, the wearer of this belt can activate the belt to gain extra damage on her next melee attack. A light weapon deals an extra 1d8 points of damage, a one-handed weapon deals an extra 2d6 points of damage, and a two-handed weapon deals an extra 3d6 points of damage. The belt can be used only after being worn continuously for 24 hours. If it is taken off, it becomes inactive until it is again donned and worn for a full 24 hours. Faint transmutation; CL 5th; Craft Wondrous Item, bull’s strength; Price 1,500 gp. Belt of Magnificence: This sparkling metal belt projects power and authority. The belt adds a +2, +4 or +6 enhancement bonus to the wearer’s Strength, Dexterity, Constitution, Intelligence, Wisdom and Charisma scores. Strong transmutation; CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, bear’s endurance, bull’s strength, cat’s grace, eagle’s splendor, fox’s cunning, owl’s wisdom; Price 25,000 gp (+2), 100,000 gp (+4) or 200,000 gp (+6). Boots of Big Stepping: The spirit of the blink dog has been harnessed within these wolfhide boots. Once per day, as a standard action, the wearer can use dimension door. The boots can be used only after being worn continuously for 24 hours. If they are taken off, they becomes inactive until they are again donned and worn for a full 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 7th; Craft Wondrous Item, dimension door; Price 11,200 gp. Boots of Charging: These boots give the wearer the Powerful Charge feat (see Chapter 1 of this book) as long as they are worn. Faint transmutation; CL 5th; Craft Wondrous Item, longstrider; Price 5,000 gp. Bracers of Quick Strike: These bracers provide the benefit of incredible speed. Once per day, when taking a full attack action, as a swift action the wearer may make one additional attack with any weapon he is holding. The attack is made at the wearer’s full base attack bonus, plus any modifiers appropriate to the situation. (This effect is not cumulative with similar effects, such as that

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:20 PM Page 43

CHAPTER 2:

Illus. by S. Tappin

Moderate evocation; CL 11th; Craft Wondrous Item, fireball; Price 1,500 gp. Field Provisions Box: When opened, this well-crafted wooden box produces enough basic food and water to feed up to fifteen humans or five horses, providing a full day’s sustenance. It can be used once per day. Faint conjuration; CL 5th; Craft Wondrous Item, create food and water; Price 2,000 gp. Gloves of Fortunate Striking: Best worn by the cleverest of warmakers, these gloves allow their wearer to attempt to change an unfortunate strike at the enemy to a more accurate one. Once per day, after the wearer of the gloves has made an attack roll (but before it’s determined whether the roll succeeded), he may choose to make the attack roll again. He must use the second result even if it’s lower. The wearer can’t use this ability if he has already made the attack roll again because of another ability he possesses, nor can he use another ability he possesses to make the attack roll again ahe uses the gloves. The gloves can be used only after they are worn continuously for 24 hours. If they are taken off, they become inactive until they are again donned and worn for a full 24 hours. Faint divination; CL 3rd; Craft Wondrous Item, true strike; Price 2,000 gp. Helm of Glorious Recovery: Once per day, the wearer of this helm can activate it by uttering the command word. The helm instantaneously cures the wearer of 4d8+7 points of damage. The helm can only be activated after being worn continuously for 24 hours. If it is taken off, it becomes inactive until it is again donned and worn for a full 24 hours. Moderate conjuration; CL 7th; Craft Wondrous Item, cure critical wounds; Price 5,600 gp. Horn of Volume: This horn lets the user be heard up to twice as far as she normally would be when speaking, singing, or using an ability that affects creatures that can hear the user. When using the skirmish or mass battle rules, the bearer can command creatures not in line of sight up to 12 squares away, instead of the normal 6. This benefit does not increase the range of Commander Effects. Faint illusion; CL 3rd; Craft Wondrous Item, ghost sound; Price 1,000 gp. Magic Sleeping Bag: This woolen sleeping bag grants the user a comfortable and peaceful night’s sleep. While the user lies within, it provides the benefit of endure elements. With a night’s rest, the user also recovers 1 hit point per character level (in addition to hit points recovered normally). Getting into or out of a magic sleeping bag is a full-round action. Faint conjuration and enchantment; CL 3rd; Craft Wondrous Item, endure elements, cure light wounds; Price 1,000 gp. Sandals of Sprinting: The fleeting speed of the cheetah has been imbued in these light sandals. Once per day, as a swift

MAGIC

provided by a speed weapon or by the haste spell, nor does it actually grant an extra action.) The bracers can be used only after being worn continuously for 24 hours. If they are taken off, they become inactive until they are again donned and worn for a full 24 hours. Faint transmutation; CL 5th; Craft Wondrous Item, haste; Price 1,200 gp. Cloak of Elemental Protection: This cloak, woven with threads of various colors, protects the wearer from energy attacks. Once per day, as a swift action, the wearer can activate the cloak and gain resistance 10 against a type of energy of the wearer’s choice (acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic). The wearer can activate the cloak when it is not his turn. The wearer therefore can respond to an energy attack by immediately activating the cloak and choosing the attack’s energy type. The cloak can be used only after being worn continuously for 24 hours. If it is taken off, it becomes inactive until it is again donned and worn for a full 24 hours. Faint abjuration; CL 3rd; Craft Wondrous Item, resist energy; Price 1,000 gp. Cloak of the Salamander: This cloak, made of scales from a reptilian creature, wraps its wearer in a deep blue flame. Any creature striking the cloak’s wearer with a natural attack or a melee weapon deals normal damage but also takes 1d6+7 points of fire damage. Moderate evocation; CL 7th; Craft Wondrous Item, fire shield; Price 56,000 gp. Cloak of Thorns: This brown cloak seems to be composed entirely of long thorns. The cloak grants its wearer a +2 natural armor bonus to AC. Any creature striking the cloak’s wearer with a natural attack or a melee weapon deals normal damage but also takes 1d4+3 points of piercing damage. Moderate transmutation; CL 7th; Craft Wondrous Item; barkskin, command plants; Price 40,000 gp. Collar of Command: When this collar is put on an animal, the animal is subject to the control of the collar’s owner as if it is under a dominate animal effect. The animal obeys the owner’s silent mental commands. Usually, the Cloak of the salamander collar is placed on an animal that has been rendered unconscious, staggered by means of nonlethal damage, or grappled and pinned. When using the skirmish or mass battle rules, this collar removes the animal’s Difficult special ability. Faint enchantment; CL 5th; Craft Wondrous Item, dominate animal; Price 30,000 gp. Exploding Spike: Warm to the touch, this red spike pulses with stored energy. The spike does nothing until it is planted firmly in the ground (a standard action). One round later, the spike becomes invisible. Any creature that thereafter comes within 10 feet of the spike causes it to explode in a fireball that deals 10d6 points of fire damage (Reflex DC 14 half ) to every creature within 20 feet of the spike. This blast destroys the spike.

43

Illus. by D. Hanley

MAGIC

CHAPTER 2:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:20 PM Page 44

44

action, the sandals’ wearer can activate them to increase her land movement by 30 feet, to a maximum of twice her normal speed, until the start of her next turn. This increase counts as an enhancement bonus, and it affects the wearer’s jumping distance as normal for increased speed. The sandals can be used only after being worn continuously for 24 hours. If they are taken off, they become inactive until they are again donned and worn for a full 24 hours. Faint transmutation; CL 5th, Craft Wondrous Item, longstrider; Price 8,000 gp. Scepter of Obedience: This scepter grants a +5 competence bonus on the bearer’s Charisma checks and Charisma-based skill checks. When using the skirmish or mass battle rules, this benefit increases the Commander rating of the bearer by 1. Faint enchantment; CL 5th; Craft Rod, charm person; Price 12,500 gp. Shirt of the Angels: This shirt seems durable despite being composed entirely of feathers (said to be taken from a living angel). The shirt grants the wearer damage reduction 5/evil. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 76,000 gp. Shirt of Bone: This shirt grants the wearer damage reduction 5/bludgeoning. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 58,000 gp. Shirt of Chains: This shirt grants the wearer damage reduction 5/piercing. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 58,000 gp. Shirt of Demonskin: This shirt, composed of bits of demon skin sewed together, grants the wearer damage reduction 5/good. Cleric of Gruumsh Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 76,000 gp. Shirt of the Fey: This light blue shirt fades, becoming almost impossible to see once worn, leaving only the faint scent of grass behind. The item grants the wearer damage reduction 5/cold iron. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 76,000 gp. Shirt of the Inevitable: This item is actually the metallic chestplate from a noble of the inevitable constructs of Mechanus, which grants the wearer damage reduction 5/chaos. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 76,000 gp. Shirt of Ironskin: This shirt is made of plates of iron grants the wearer damage reduction 5/adamantine. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 90,000 gp. Shirt of the Moon: This gleaming silvery shirt grants the wearer damage reduction 5/silver.

Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 76,000 gp. Shirt of Resilience: This sturdy leather shirt grants the wearer damage reduction 5/magic. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 58,000 gp. Shirt of Slaadskin: This shirt of scaly slaad skin grants the wearer damage reduction 5/lawful. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 76,000 gp. Shirt of the Treant: This leafy vest grants the wearer damage reduction 5/slashing. Strong abjuration and perhaps evocation (if miracle is used); CL 18th; Craft Wondrous Item, stoneskin, miracle or wish; Price 58,000 gp. Sleeping Spike: This twisted ashen spike displays no magical properties until activated. The spike does nothing until it is planted firmly in the ground (a standard action). One round later, the spike becomes invisible. Any creature that thereafter comes within 10 feet of the spike causes it to emit a sleep effect (Will DC 17 negates) in a 20foot-radius burst, affecting all creatures with 10 Hit Dice or fewer. This effect destroys the spike. Moderate enchantment; CL 9th; Craft Wondrous Item, symbol of sleep; Price 3,250 gp. Stunning Spike: This bronze spike tingles the fingers with static electricity but demonstrates no magical properties until activated. The spike does nothing until it is planted firmly in the ground (a standard action). One round later, the spike becomes invisible. Any creature that thereafter comes within 10 feet of the spike causes it to burst, stunning all creatures in a 20-foot radius for 1 round (Will DC 20 negates). This effect destroys the spike. Strong enchantment; CL 13th; Craft Wondrous Item, symbol of stunning, guards and wards; Price 9,550 gp.

SPECIFIC CURSED ITEMS Both of the following are relatively common cursed items. Collar of Obedience: This plain band of iron can be worn as a bracelet or necklace. The item imposes a –2 penalty on the wearer’s Will saving throws. When using the skirmish or mass battle rules, this effect makes a creature easier to command, reducing its Difficult rating by 2. Faint enchantment; CL 3rd; Craft Wondrous Item, doom; Price 3,000 gp. Collar of Slavery: This black collar can be worn as a bracelet or necklace. The item imposes a –10 penalty on the wearer’s saving throws against fear effects. It also imposes a –10 penalty on level checks to oppose Intimidate checks. When using the skirmish or mass battle rules, a creature or unit using this item is considered to belong to any faction. Moderate enchantment; CL 7th; Craft Wondrous Item, charm monster; Price 8,000 gp.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:20 PM Page 45

Illus. by D. Hanley

his chapter contains complete DUNGEONS & DRAGONS statistics for monsters ranging from spiny nuisances (the hatchling kruthik) to manifestations of immortal evil (the aspect of Orcus and the aspect of Lolth). As creatures designed, in part, for miniatures play, these monsters tend to have a couple of striking and dramatic special abilities rather than full arsenals of spell-like abilities or multiple options for special attacks. Simplicity does not imply weakness. If D&D Miniatures has one lesson for the roleplaying game, it’s that combinations of specific monsters with well-defined strengths can be lethal. Creatures such as the gravehound, phargion, ghirrash, and walking wall have unusual virtues. Working together, or even singly, these deceptively powerful creatures should push the PCs to use their own strengths to their utmost. This chapter does not include D&D Miniatures statistics for these creatures. Those statistics will surface as each of these creatures appears as a miniature in the next few years. Two creatures, the Bright Naga and the Stonechild, appear in Dragoneye.

ABYSSAL EVISCERATOR

Medium Outsider (Chaotic, Extraplanar, Evil) Hit Dice: 4d8+20 (38 hp) Initiative: +0 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares) Armor Class: 20 (+10 natural), touch 10, flat-footed 20 Base Attack/Grapple: +4/+9 Attack: Claw +10 melee (1d6+5) Full Attack: 2 claws +10 melee (1d6+5) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Rake 1d6+5 Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., immunity to poison, resistance to acid 10, cold 10, electricity 10, and fire 10, scent Saves: Fort +9, Ref +4, Will +5 Abilities: Str 20, Dex 11, Con 20, Int 9, Wis 12, Cha 11 Skills: Balance +7, Climb +12, Intimidate +7, Jump +12, Listen +8, Spot +8, Swim +12 Feats: Blind-Fight, Weapon Focus (claw) Environment: Infinite Layers of the Abyss Organization: Solitary, pack (2–9 plus 50% chance for 1 leader with 6 HD) Challenge Rating: 4 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Always chaotic evil Advancement: 5–6 HD (Medium); 7–12 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: —

45

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:21 PM Page 46

guard contingents of creatures throughout the Abyss, as well as on the Material Plane. With its keen senses, the creature can hunt down enemies or detect intruders, making it valuable to those who employ it. Abyssal eviscerators speak Abyssal, though they prefer to get their message across through bloodshed.

Combat

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

Eviscerators prefer to fight alone or with groups, against tough odds or against foes that are easy to overwhelm, by ambush or in fair contests. The fact is, eviscerators simply prefer to fight. Eviscerators have a habit of playing with the creatures they catch rather than killing them outright. They enjoy pinning victims with their massive upper arms and tearing into them with the razor-sharp claws of their lower arms. Rake (Ex): Attack bonus +10 melee, damage 1d6+5.

ASPECT

Illus. by S. Tappin

Abyssal eviscerator

This creature is a seven-foot tall, purplish mass of limbs and armor-plated muscle. It stands on a pair of wiry legs, hunched from the sheer weight of a pair of massive arms and a gigantic head split by a huge, tooth-encrusted mouth. Sprouting from its belly is a second pair of taloned arms, which are as spindly as its main arms are muscular.

Adventurers often mistake the abyssal eviscerator for a mindless, bloodthirsty brute bent on wanton destruction. Actually, it’s a cunning, bloodthirsty brute bent on wanton destruction. Though originally from the 423rd layer of the Abyss, the abyssal eviscerator has found a place in the warbands, armies, and

All tremble when the deities and archfiends send manifestations of their personal power onto the battlefield. While the gods usually send creatures from the Outer Planes to assist their clerics, sometimes a patron will send some small portion of its own power instead. These living embodiments of the gods’ life force carry on crusades for good or evil. An aspect looks like the archfiend or deity from which it springs (known as the aspect’s “original”). It is only a pale shadow of the original archfiend or deity. Still, a pale shadow of such a mighty being is formidable indeed. You can find descriptions of the original archfiends in Book of Vile Darkness and the original deities in Deities and Demigods. An aspect is the embodiment of a small portion of an archfiend’s or deity’s life force. The original’s power is so great that this shred of life force is actually able to take shape as a living creature (or an undead creature, as in the case of an aspect of Vecna). Rarely, aspects arise spontaneously on the planes where their originals reside, rather like naturally occurring echoes of the original’s powerful presence. More often, aspects are called forth by magic of some kind. In any case, they are short-lived, usually fading back into nonexistence within a day. The life force that manifested as the aspect returns to the original, dissipates, or lurks in the area, ready to manifest as an aspect again if the conditions are right. While aspects are spiritual rather than biological in origin, they manifest as actual living (or undead) creatures. They have consciousness, intelligence, and will. They are notoriously

pqqqqrs ASPECTS IN YOUR GAME Aspects are a great way for you (the DM) to increase the presence of deities in the campaign. The PCs might never be able to defeat Hextor in hand-to-hand combat, but maybe they can take on Hextor’s aspect in a forbidden temple. Use aspects when the party is of low enough level that a single aspect is a dangerous foe (maybe too dangerous). Don’t wait until the party is so strong that an aspect is “just another monster.” For a highlevel party, you might be able to pull off a battle against a team of various evil aspects, but they work best as single, major opponents. Aspects are powerful but not versatile. If you want an aspect to be able to handle a clever and competent party, it could use the backup of

a spellcaster—someone to cast fly, invisibility purge, stoneskin, blur, and other useful spells. For high-level parties, invent more powerful aspects using these and the original archfiends and deities as your guides. You’ll probably want to place limits on calling aspects to reflect how deities work in your campaign. For example, a cleric might need to perform some duty for a deity before being allowed to call the deity’s aspect. In most campaigns, it’s best to restrict aspects to special characters, places, or events rather than making them as commonplace as ordinary outsiders.

pqqqqrs

46

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:21 PM Page 47

Characters can sometimes use the planar ally or planar binding spell to call an aspect. In the case of the more powerful aspects, greater planar ally or greater planar binding is necessary.

Other Aspects The aspects described here are those that adventurers are most likely to encounter. Others certainly exist. Most likely, every being whose power level matches the originals mentioned here also has aspects, though some aspects might be quite rare. It’s also possible that a deity would have different sorts of aspects that represent different fragments of the being’s power. The aspect of Lolth in this chapter, for example, manifests her poisonous nature but not her power over webs. Another aspect of Lolth might have web powers but not poison. A third might express Lolth’s power over spiders, and so on. Other aspects of the same deity may be significantly more powerful than those described here. None are less powerful.

ASPECT OF ASMODEUS Large Outsider (Baatezu, Evil, Extraplanar, Lawful) Hit Dice: 10d8+40 (85 hp) Initiative: +6 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares), fly 120 ft. (good) Armor Class: 23 (–1 size, +2 Dex, +12 natural), touch 11, flatfooted 21 Base Attack/Grapple: +10/+20 Attack: Ruby Rod +15 melee (2d6+7 plus 1d8+5 inflict light wounds) or Ruby Rod +15 melee touch (1d8+5 inflict light wounds) Full Attack: Ruby Rod +15/+10 melee (2d6+7 plus 1d8+5 inflict light wounds) or Ruby Rod +15/+10 melee touch (1d8+5 inflict light wounds) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft., immunity to fire and poison, resistance to acid 10 and cold 10, see in darkness, telepathy 100 ft. Saves: Fort +11, Ref +9, Will +13 Abilities: Str 22, Dex 15, Con 19, Int 21, Wis 22, Cha 20 Skills: Bluff +18, Concentration +17, Craft (alchemy) +18, Diplomacy +22, Disguise +5 (+7 acting), Intimidate +20, Knowledge (arcana) +18, Knowledge (history) +18, Knowledge (the planes) +18, Knowledge (religion) +18, Listen +19, Search +19, Sense Motive +19, Spot +19, Survival +6 (+8 following tracks, +10 following tracks on other planes, +8 on other planes) Feats: Combat Expertise, Combat Reflexes, Improved Initiative, Power Attack Environment: Nine Hells of Baator (Nessus, the 9th Hell) Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 9 Treasure: None Alignment: Always lawful evil Advancement: —

Illus. by A. Smith

Aspect of Asmodeus

CHAPTER 3:

Calling Aspects

An aspect is a deity’s or archfiend’s power coalesced into a single point. Typically, this power can’t coalesce into two nearby points. Thus, aspects of a specific original are almost always found alone. Sometimes spellcasters or creatures wielding powerful magic items can force two aspects of the same original into the same area. These aspects are likely to attack each other, even if they’re good-aligned. The proximity of another aspect of the same deity apparently causes an aspect great distress. Vile servants of archfiends and evil deities sometimes call forth aspects of their unholy masters to take part in unspeakable rituals. The less said about these rites, the better.

MONSTERS

single-minded and unwilling to communicate. They may help mortals, but only because they want to—not because they’re asked. Aspects are usually as big as giants, although they are sometimes scaled more like humans. It is very rare for them to be larger than Large or smaller than Medium. In the case of archfiends, aspects are the same size as or smaller than the original. In the case of deities, an aspect appears in a size that reflects the deity’s power. (Deities can alter their size at will, so one can’t really compare an aspect to the original’s “actual” size.) If the original has a signature weapon or other possession, the aspect may have a similar weapon (albeit a much weaker version, just as the aspect is a weaker version of the original). Such a weapon or other item loses its magical properties when separated from its aspect. Aspects disdain mortals. They do not bother commanding troops, even those that would follow them loyally, and they aren’t inclined to even listen to the orders of any but the best commanders. Still, they’re known to find common cause with likeminded warbands and to fight alongside them. Unlike avatars (introduced in Deities and Demigods), aspects are not extensions of the original. The original can’t see through the aspect’s eyes and doesn’t know what the aspect learns. Destroying an aspect sometimes weakens the original by dissipating the aspect’s life force and preventing it from being reabsorbed into the original, but beyond that, hurting the aspect does not harm the original.

47

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:21 PM Page 48

Over 13 feet tall, this creature has lustrous dark skin and hair. His eyes shine with the power of hell, and his head is crowned with two small red horns. He dresses in finery of red and black.

Thri-Kreen Ranger

An aspect of Asmodeus, like other baatezu, can speak telepathically to any creature within 100 feet that has a language. It also speaks Infernal, Celestial, and Draconic.

Combat MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

An aspect of Asmodeus, unlike its original, willingly enters combat, albeit with a disdainful air. It flies quickly to wherever its Ruby Rod can deal the most telling blow against the enemy. An aspect of Asmodeus’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as evil-aligned and lawful-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Possessions: The aspect’s Ruby Rod acts as a +1 morningstar that additionally bestows an inflict light wounds effect on any creature it touches (caster level 10th, Will DC 19 half ). An aspect can use the rod to make a normal melee attack or a melee touch attack (in which case it bestows the inflict light wounds effect but does not deal damage otherwise).

Thri-Kreen illus. by D. Hanley Aspect of Bahamut illus. by A. Smith

ASPECT OF BAHAMUT Large Dragon (Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 10d12+60 (125 hp) Initiative: +4 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares), fly 100 ft. (good) Armor Class: 23 (–1 size, +14 natural), touch 9, flat-footed 23 Base Attack/Grapple: +10/+22 Attack: Bite +17 melee (2d6+8) Full Attack: Bite +17 melee (2d6+8) and 2 claws +12 melee (1d8+4) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Breath weapon Special Qualities: Blindsense 60 ft., damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 120 ft., immunity to magic sleep effects and paralysis, low-light vision Saves: Fort +13, Ref +7, Will +14 Abilities: Str 26, Dex 11, Con 22, Int 23, Wis 24, Cha 23 Skills: Diplomacy +21, Handle Animal +19, Intimidate +19, Knowledge (arcana) +19, Knowledge (history) +19, Knowledge (nature) +21, Knowledge (the planes) +19, Knowledge (religion) +19, Listen +22, Ride +2, Search +19, Sense Motive +20, Spot +22, Survival +7 (+9 following tracks, +11 following tracks in aboveground natural environments, +13 following tracks in aboveground natural environments on other planes, +11 following tracks on other planes, +9 in aboveground natural environments, +11 in aboveground natural environments on other planes, +9 on other planes) Feats: Alertness, Cleave, Improved Initiative, Power Attack Environment: Seven Mounting Heavens of Celestia Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 10 Treasure: None Alignment: Always lawful good Advancement: — This long, sinuous dragon is covered in silver-white scales that sparkle and gleam with a light all their own. Its catlike eyes shift between the blue of an azure sky and the chill of a frozen glacier, as its mood determines.

48

Aspect of Bahamut

An aspect of Bahamut speaks Celestial, Common, and Draconic.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:22 PM Page 49

Combat An aspect of Bahamut flies to an advantageous spot where it can use its breath weapon to good effect or keep numerous enemies from surrounding it. Given a chance, it’s happy to fight in pitch darkness. Breath Weapon (Su): 40-ft. cone, once per day, damage 10d6 cold, Reflex DC 21 half. The save DC is Constitution-based.

ASPECT OF DEMOGORGON MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

Large Earth Elemental

following tracks, +9 following tracks in aboveground natural environments, +11 following tracks in aboveground natural environments on other planes, +9 following tracks on other planes, +7 in aboveground natural environments, +9 in aboveground natural environments on other planes, +7 on other planes), Swim +18 Feats: Alertness, Combat Reflexes, Dodge, Improved Initiative Environment: Infinite Layers of the Abyss (the Brine Flats, the 88th layer) Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 9 Treasure: None Alignment: Always chaotic evil Advancement: —

Large Earth Elemental illus. by S. Tappin Aspect of Demogorgon illus. by A. Smith

Large Outsider (Chaotic, Evil, Extraplanar, Tanar’ri) Hit Dice: 11d8+55 (104 hp) Initiative: +7 Speed: 35 ft. (7 squares) Armor Class: 23 (–1 size, +3 Dex, +11 natural), touch 12, flatfooted 20 Base Attack/Grapple: +11/+19 Attack: Tentacle +14 melee (1d6+4) Full Attack: 2 tentacles +14 melee (1d6+4) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft., dual actions, immunity to electricity and poison, resistance to acid 10, cold 10, and fire 10, see invisibility, telepathy 100 ft. Saves: Fort +12, Ref +10, Will +12 Abilities: Str 19, Dex 16, Con 21, Int 20, Wis 21, Cha 20 Skills: Concentration +19, Craft (alchemy) +19, Diplomacy +21, Jump +18, Knowledge (arcana) +19, Knowledge (history) +19, Knowledge (nature) +21, Knowledge (the planes) +19, Listen +21, Search +19, Sense Motive +19, Spot +21, Survival +5 (+7

Almost 15 feet in height, this bizarre creature has two heads, each like that of a baboon, each of which connects to its serpentine body on snakelike necks. It is covered in dark blue-green scales. It has two long tentacles in place of arms and a long, forked tail.

Demogorgon’s mortal servants sometimes call forth his aspect to receive living sacrifices of sentient beings. Aspects of Demogorgon are infamous for using these opportunities to take more than his followers bargain for. An aspect of Demogorgon, like other tanar’ri, can speak telepathically to any creature within 100 feet that has a language. It also speaks Abyssal, Celestial, and Draconic.

Combat

Aspect of Demogorgon

An aspect of Demogorgon is more willing to engage in combat than Demogorgon himself, mostly because the aspect doesn’t have underlings at its beck and call to do the fighting for it. Even so, it would rather use its great speed to head off enemies or reach objectives without having to fight.

49

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:22 PM Page 50

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

An aspect uses its dual nature to move quickly and maneuver to advantage in combat. An aspect of Demogorgon’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as chaotic-aligned and evil-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Dual Actions (Ex): An aspect of Demogorgon, just like Demogorgon itself, takes two rounds’ worth of actions in any given round. Thus, it can make a full attack and take a double move; make two full attacks and two 5-foot steps; a full attack, a move action, and another attack; and so on. See Invisibility (Su): An aspect of Demogorgon has a continuous see invisibility ability, as the spell (caster level 11th).

Illus. by A. Smith

ASPECT OF HEXTOR

50

Large Outsider (Evil, Extraplanar, Lawful) Hit Dice: 12d8+60 (114 hp) Initiative: +3 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) Armor Class: 22 (–1 size, +3 Dex, +5 natural, +5 +1 scale mail), touch 12, flat-footed 19 Base Attack/Grapple: +12/+22 Attack: +1 flail +18 melee (2d6+6) Full Attack: +1 flail +14/+9/+4 melee (2d6+6), +1 longsword +14 melee (2d6+3/19–20), +1 battleaxe +14 melee (2d6+3/×3), +1 heavy mace +14 melee (2d6+3), +1 heavy pick +14 melee (1d8+3/×4), +1 scimitar +14 melee (1d8+3/18–20) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +13, Ref +11, Will +11

Abilities: Str 22, Dex 17, Con 20, Int 17, Wis 17, Cha 18 Skills: Climb +18, Craft (weaponsmithing) +18, Diplomacy +8, Handle Animal +19, Jump +22, Knowledge (arcana) +18, Knowledge (history) +18, Knowledge (nobility and royalty) +18, Knowledge (religion) +18, Listen +18, Ride +5, Sense Motive +18, Spot +18 Feats: Blind-Fight, Cleave, Combat Reflexes, Multiweapon Fighting, Power Attack Environment: Infernal Battlefield of Acheron Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 11 Treasure: None Alignment: Always lawful evil Advancement: — This 12-foot-tall humanoid has gray skin, tusks, and six arms. Each arm brandishes a different weapon, and the thing’s body is covered by iron scale mail decorated with numerous skulls.

An aspect of Hextor does what Hextor does—it conquers. An aspect of Hextor speaks Common, Draconic, and Infernal.

Combat An aspect of Hextor loves to do battle, especially against the forces of good. It willingly provokes attacks of opportunity if that’s what’s needed to position itself for the maximum use of its many melee attacks. An aspect of Hextor’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as evil-aligned and lawful-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction.

ASPECT OF KORD Large Outsider (Chaotic, Extraplanar, Good) Hit Dice: 14d8+70 (133 hp) Initiative: +7 Speed: 50 ft. (10 squares) Armor Class: 21 (–1 size, +4 Dex, +8 natural), touch 13, flatfooted 17 Base Attack/Grapple: +14/+26 Attack: +1 greatsword +24 melee (3d6+12/19–20) Full Attack: +1 greatsword +24/+19/+14 melee (3d6+12/19–20) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Barbarian rage, damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +14, Ref +13, Will +12 Abilities: Str 27, Dex 18, Con 21, Int 17, Wis 16, Cha 18 Skills: Balance +23, Climb +25, Diplomacy +6, Intimidate +21, Jump +35, Listen +20, Search +20, Sense Motive +20, Spot +20, Swim +25, Survival +20 (+22 following tracks), Tumble +23 Feats: Blind-Fight, Cleave, Improved Initiative, Power Attack, Weapon Focus (greatsword) Environment: Heroic Domains of Ysgard Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 11 Treasure: None Alignment: Always chaotic evil Advancement: —

Aspect of Hextor

This figure is a hugely muscular, 12-foot-tall man with tan skin wielding a greatsword. He has long red hair and a beard. He wears white dragonhide gauntlets, blue boots, and a fighting girdle of red leather. His belt sports an eight-pointed symbol.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:33 PM Page 51

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft., spell resistance 25 Saves: Fort +12, Ref +13, Will +17 Abilities: Str 16, Dex 18, Con 17, Int 27, Wis 26, Cha 23 Skills: Appraise +25, Balance +21, Bluff +23, Climb +28, Craft (alchemy) +25, Diplomacy +10, Disguise +23 (+25 acting), Escape Artist +21, Intimidate +25, Jump +24, Knowledge (history) +25, Knowledge (the planes) +25, Knowledge (religion) +25, Listen +25, Search +25, Sense Motive +25, Spot +25, Survival +8 (+10 following tracks, +12 following tracks on other planes, +10 on other planes), Use Rope +4 (+6 binding) Feats: Blind-Fight, Improved Critical (bite), Weapon Finesse, Weapon Focus (bite), Weapon Specialization (bite) Environment: The Infinite Layers of the Abyss Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 11 Treasure: None Alignment: Always chaotic evil Advancement: — This unnatural creature has the body of a great, gray spider, but the head of a female drow protrudes from where the spider's head would be. It has long hair and multifaceted eyes. The creature is 7 feet tall and at least that long.

This aspect of Lolth expresses Lolth's dual nature. Its form is one of Lolth's three normal forms (the other two being a beautiful female drider and an alluring female drow). Powerful drow have been known to call aspects of Lolth to serve as witnesses to agreements and pacts between scheming Illus. by A. Smith

Aspect of Kord

An aspect of Kord is always doing something—fighting if it gets a chance, and fighting evil dragons if it gets half a chance. Powerful followers of Kord sometimes call up an aspect of Kord to pit their strength against it in rituals that are half sport and half worship. An aspect of Kord speaks Celestial, Common, and Draconic.

Combat An aspect of Kord uses its Tumble skill to get past weaker opponents and to test its battle prowess against the most powerful opponents available. An aspect of Kord’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as chaotic-aligned and good-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Barbarian Rage (Ex): Once per day, an aspect of Kord can fly into a barbarian rage, just like a 1st-level barbarian (see page 25 of the Player’s Handbook). The rage lasts 10 rounds.

ASPECT OF LOLTH Large Outsider (Chaotic, Evil, Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 14d8+42 (105 hp) Initiative: +4 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares), climb 20 ft. Armor Class: 21 (–1 size, +4 Dex, +8 natural), touch +13, flatfooted +17 Base Attack/Grapple: +14/+21 Attack: Bite +18 melee (1d8+6/19–20 plus poison) Full Attack: Bite +18 melee (1d8+6/19–20 plus poison) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Poison

Aspect of Lolth

51

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:34 PM Page 52

noble houses. The presence of an aspect makes such agreements less likely to be broken, or so the theory goes. An aspect of Lolth speaks Abyssal, Draconic, Elven, and Undercommon.

Combat

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

An aspect of Lolth’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as chaotic-aligned and evil-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Poison (Ex): Injury, Fortitude DC 20, initial and secondary damage 1d10 Str. The DC is Constitution-based.

Illus. by A. Smith

ASPECT OF MEPHISTOPHELES Large Outsider (Baatezu, Evil, Extraplanar, Lawful) Hit Dice: 10d8+40 (85 hp) Initiative: +8 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares), fly 100 ft. (poor) Armor Class: 23 (–1 size, +4 Dex, +10 natural), touch 13, flatfooted 19 Base Attack/Grapple: +10/+18 Attack: +1 icy burst ranseur +14 melee (2d6+7/×3 plus 1d6 cold) Full Attack: +1 icy burst ranseur +14/+9 melee (2d6+7/×3 plus 1d6 cold) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. (20 ft. with ranseur) Special Attacks: Fireball Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft., fire shield, immunity to fire and poison, resistance to acid 10 and cold 10, telepathy 100 ft. Saves: Fort +11, Ref +11, Will +13 Abilities: Str 18, Dex 19, Con 19, Int 18, Wis 23, Cha 20

Skills: Balance +19, Concentration +17, Craft (alchemy) +17, Diplomacy +7, Intimidate +18, Jump +23, Knowledge (arcana) +17, Knowledge (history) +17, Knowledge (the planes) +17, Listen +19, Search +17, Sense Motive +19, Survival +6 (+8 following tracks, +10 following tracks on other planes, +8 on other planes), Tumble +19 Feats: Improved Initiative, Power Attack, Spell Focus (evocation), Spell Penetration Environment: Nine Hells of Baator (Cania, the 8th Hell) Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 9 Treasure: None Alignment: Always lawful evil Advancement: — This 9-foot tall creature’s hell-red skin, bat wings, dead-white eyes, and jutting ram’s horns proclaim his diabolical origin. He is swathed in flowing black capes and wields a three-pronged ranseur covered in frost.

An aspect of Mephistopheles manifests the archdevil’s mastery of fire and ice. It alternately displays cool cunning and fiery rage. Like other baatezu, an aspect of Mephistopheles can speak telepathically to any creature within 100 feet that has a language. It also speaks Infernal, Celestial, and Draconic.

Combat An aspect of Mephistopheles’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as evil-aligned and lawful-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Fire Shield (Su): An aspect of Mephistopheles is continuously sheathed in flame, as the fire shield spell (caster level 10th). The save DC is Charisma-based. Fireball (Sp): Once per day an aspect of Mephistopheles can create a fireball effect (caster level 10th, Reflex DC 19 half ). The save DC is Charisma-based.

ASPECT OF NERULL

52

Aspect of Mephistopheles

Large Outsider (Evil, Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 16d8+54 (126 hp) Initiative: +5 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) Armor Class: 22 (–1 size, +5 Dex, +8 natural), touch 14, flatfooted 17 Base Attack/Grapple: +16/+23 Attack: +1 scythe +20 melee (2d6+4/×4) Full Attack: +1 scythe +20/+15/+10/+5 melee (2d6+4/×4) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Inflict critical wounds Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +13, Ref +15, Will +18 Abilities: Str 17, Dex 20, Con 17, Int 24, Wis 26, Cha 21 Skills: Appraise +26, Bluff +24, Craft (alchemy) +26, Diplomacy +9, Disable Device +26, Disguise +24 (+26 acting), Intimidate +26, Knowledge (arcana) +26, Knowledge (the planes) +26, Knowledge (religion) +26, Knowledge (undead) +26, Listen +27, Open Lock +24, Search +26, Sense Motive +27, Spot +27, Survival +8 (+10 following tracks, +12 following tracks on other planes, +8 on other planes) Feats: Combat Reflexes, Dodge, Improved Initiative, Toughness (2), Weapon Focus (scythe) Environment: Tarterian Depths of Carceri Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 12 Treasure: None

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:34 PM Page 53

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

Special Attacks: Death strike Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft., immunity to electricity and poison, resistance to acid 10, cold 10, and fire 10, see invisibility, telepathy 100 ft. Saves: Fort +13, Ref +9, Will +9 Abilities: Str 23, Dex 16, Con 25, Int 20, Wis 17, Cha 16 Skills: Concentration +19, Craft (alchemy) +17, Diplomacy +5, Escape Artist +15, Intimidate +15, Knowledge (arcana) +17, Knowledge (the planes) +17, Knowledge (religion) +17, Knowledge (undead) +17, Listen +15, Search +17, Sense Motive +15, Spellcraft +19, Spot +15, Survival +3 (+5 following tracks, +7 following tracks on other planes, +5 on other planes), Use Rope +3 (+5 bindings) Feats: Cleave, Improved Critical (morningstar), Power Attack, Weapon Focus (morningstar) Environment: Infinite Layers of the Abyss (Thanatos) Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 9 Treasure: None Alignment: Always chaotic evil Advancement: — This creature’s 15-foot-tall bulk is obviously demonic. Its head is that of a horned ram, and its legs end in cloven hooves. Batlike wings complete the demonic visage. It wields a mighty rod of obsidian and black iron, topped with a skull.

An aspect of Orcus, like other tanar’ri, can speak telepathically to any creature within 100 feet that has a language. It also speaks Abyssal, Celestial, and Draconic. Illus. by A. Smith

Aspect of Nerull

Alignment: Always neutral evil Advancement: — This gaunt, 12-foot-tall creature resembles a mummified human corpse with rusty red skin, thick greenish-black hair, a cowled black cloak, and eyes, teeth, and nails like poisonous verdigris. He wields a mighty scythe.

Nerull’s aspect manifests the deity’s mastery over negative energy. An aspect of Nerull speaks Abyssal, Common, Draconic, and Infernal.

Combat An aspect of Nerull’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as evil-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Inflict Critical Wounds (Sp): At will, an aspect of Nerull can use an inflict critical wounds effect (caster level 16th, Will DC 22 half ). The save DC is Wisdom-based.

ASPECT OF ORCUS Large Outsider (Chaotic, Extraplanar, Evil, Tanar’ri) Hit Dice: 9d8+63 (103 hp) Initiative: +3 Speed: 20 ft. (4 squares), fly 40 ft. (poor) Armor Class: 21 (–1 size, +3 Dex, +9 natural), touch 12, flatfooted 18 Base Attack/Grapple: +9/+19 Attack: Wand of Orcus +16 melee (2d6+10/19–20) Full Attack: Wand of Orcus +16/+11 melee (2d6+10/19–20) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft.

Aspect of Orcus

53

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:34 PM Page 54

Combat

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

An aspect of Orcus loves to wade into melee. It wields a weaker version of Orcus’s famous wand, choosing carefully which enemy deserves its death strike. An aspect of Orcus’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as chaotic-aligned and evil-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. See Invisibility (Su): An aspect of Orcus has a continuous see invisibility ability, as the spell (caster level 9th). Possessions: The aspect’s wand of Orcus acts as a +1 morningstar. Additionally, once per day an aspect of Orcus can use it to make a death strike attack. The aspect must decide before attacking whether to use the death strike, and if the attack misses, that use of the ability is wasted. Any living creature struck by the wand when the aspect is making a death strike must succeed on a DC 17 Fortitude save or die.

Illus. by A. Smith

ASPECT OF TIAMAT Large Dragon (Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 10d12+50 (115 hp) Initiative: +4 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares), fly 50 ft. (clumsy) Armor Class: 23 (–1 size, +14 natural), touch +9, flat-footed +23 Base Attack/Grapple: +10/+21 Attack: Bite +16 melee (2d6+3) Full Attack: 5 bites +16 melee (2d6+3) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Breath weapon Special Qualities: Blindsense 60 ft., damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 120 ft., immunity to magic sleep effects and paralysis, low-light vision Saves: Fort +12, Ref +7, Will +10 Abilities: Str 24, Dex 11, Con 21, Int 19, Wis 16, Cha 18 Skills: Intimidate +17, Knowledge (arcana) +17, Knowledge (history) +17, Knowledge +17 (the planes), Knowledge (religion) +17, Listen +16, Search +17, Sense Motive +16, Spot +16, Survival +16 (+18 following tracks, +20 following tracks on other planes, +18 on other planes) Feats: Cleave, Great Cleave, Improved Initiative, Power Attack Environment: Nine Hells of Baator Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 10 Treasure: None Alignment: Always chaotic evil Advancement: — This thick-bodied dragon sports five full heads, each a different color: white, black, green, blue, and red. Its body is subtly striped in those colors, slowly mixing to black along its long, spine-tipped tail.

An aspect of Tiamat eats what it can and kills what it can’t. An aspect of Tiamat speaks Common, Draconic, and Infernal.

Combat An aspect of Tiamat commonly flies above foes, hits them with its breath weapon, and then descends into the midst of the foes to strike out in all directions. Breath Weapon (Su): 40-ft. cone, once per day, 8d6 acid, cold, electricity, or fire, Reflex DC 20 half. The save is Constitutionbased.

54

Aspect of Tiamat

ASPECT OF VECNA Medium Undead Hit Dice: 10d12 (65 hp) Initiative: +3 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares) Armor Class: 22 (+3 Dex, +5 natural, +4 deflection), touch +17, flat-footed +19 Base Attack/Grapple: +5/+8 Attack: +1 ghost touch dagger +9 melee (1d4+4/19–20) Full Attack: +1 ghost touch dagger +9 melee (1d4+4/19–20) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5ft. Special Attacks: Magic missile Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/epic, darkvision 60 ft., spell resistance 21, undead traits Saves: Fort +3, Ref +6, Will +13 Abilities: Str 17, Dex 16, Con —, Int 28, Wis 23, Cha 18 Skills: Appraise +22, Concentration +17 (casting defensively +21), Craft (alchemy) +22, Decipher Script +22, Diplomacy +6, Knowledge (arcana) +22, Knowledge (history) +22, Knowledge (the planes) +22, Knowledge (religion) +22, Listen +21, Search +22, Sense Motive +19, Spellcraft +24, Spot +21, Survival +6 (+8 following tracks, +10 following tracks on other planes, +8 on other planes) Feats: Alertness, Blind-Fight, Combat Casting, Spell Penetration Environment: Any Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 10 Treasure: None Alignment: Always neutral evil Advancement: —

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:35 PM Page 55

This withered humanoid stands 6 feet tall. Its flesh seems partly mummified, and portions of its flesh are absent, most notably one eye and one hand. It wears dark robes and cloaks, each embroidered with secret mystical runes. Its one remaining eye flashes with magic, malice, and perhaps madness.

BRIGHT NAGA

An aspect of Vecna’s manifests the god’s destructive mastery over magic. An aspect of Vecna speaks Abyssal, Common, Draconic, and Infernal.

This beautiful creature looks like a snake with reticulated white-gold patterns running the length of its body and a head that bears vaguely human features. Black and gold spines jut from its back down the length of its spine.

MONSTERS

An aspect of Vecna strikes vulnerable targets with its magic missile, using its dagger only as a Bright naga last resort. Magic Missile (Sp): At will, an aspect of Vecna can use an empowered magic missile effect, as the spell (caster level 10th). An aspect’s Concentration modifier is high enough that it can cast defensively with no chance of failure. Undead Traits: An aspect of Vecna is immune to mind-affecting effects, poison, sleep effects, paralysis, stunning, disease, death effects, and any effect that requires a Fortitude save unless it also works on objects or is harmless. It is not subject to critical hits, nonlethal damage, ability damage to its physical ability scores, ability drain, energy drain, fatigue, exhaustion, or death from massive damage. It cannot be raised, and resurrection works only if it is willing.

CHAPTER 3:

Combat

Bright Naga illus. by S. Tappin Aspect of Vecna illus. by A. Smith

Large Aberration Hit Dice: 5d8+15 (37 hp) Initiative: +1 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) Armor Class: 15 (–1 size, +1 Dex, +5 natural), touch 10, flat-footed 14 Base Attack/Grapple: +3/+9 Attack: Bite +4 melee (2d6+3) Full Attack: Bite +4 melee (2d6+3) Space/Reach: 10 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Mock spell Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +4, Ref +2, Will +6 Abilities: Str 15, Dex 12, Con 17, Int 10, Wis 15, Cha 12 Skills: Concentration +11 (casting defensively +15), Listen +12, Spot +4 Feats: Alertness, Combat Casting Environment: Warm mountains Organization: Solitary, nest (2–4), or entourage (1 bright naga plus 2–5 troglodytes) Challenge Rating: 3 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually chaotic evil Advancement: 7–10 HD (Large); 11–15 HD (Huge) Level Adjustment: —

Nagas are intelligent creatures with a variety of magical powers. They are natural masters of those around them, using subtle wards and clever traps to keep intruders from disturbing their peace. The bright naga is a far weaker creature than its better-known kin. It lacks the poisonous bite and the array of spells that are common among more powerful nagas. Some say that bright nagas are evidence of genetic flaws or unfavorable mating choices on the parts of “true nagas.” All nagas have long, snakelike bodies covered with glistening scales and more or less human faces. A bright naga is 15 feet long and weighs about 500 pounds. Its eyes are bright and intelligent, burning with an almost hypnotic inner light. A bright naga’s gold coloration darkens toward red when it becomes angry. Bright nagas speak Common and Draconic.

Combat

Aspect of Vecna

Given a chance, a bright naga takes advantage of its labyrinthine lair, drawing enemies into an exasperating combat in which the naga appears, strikes, and disappears over and over again. Mock Spell (Sp): A bright naga can use the effect of one 1stlevel sorcerer spell at will, as a 3rd-level sorcerer. This mock spell is magically imprinted in the bright naga’s mind from an

55

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:35 PM Page 56

This creature looks like a cross between a lion and a human, with a powerfully etched human body and the head and mane of the feline. Its thick hair is braided and falls over scant but utilitarian clothing.

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

Bright Naga

Illus. by S. Tappin

early age, and it cannot be changed. Magic missile is the most common mock spell, but bright nagas are also known to use burning hands, color spray, and virtually any other sorcerer spell. The spell’s save DC, if appropriate, is 12. The save DC is Charisma-based. (With a Concentration modifier of +11 and the Combat Casting feat, a bright naga can cast defensively without risk of failure.)

CATFOLK

Catfolk, 1st-Level Warrior Medium Humanoid (Catfolk) Hit Dice: 1d8+1 (5 hp) Initiative: +2 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) Armor Class: 15 (+2 Dex, +2 leather, +1 natural), touch 12, flat-footed 13 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/+2 Attack: Rapier +3 melee (1d6+1/18–20) or longbow +3 ranged (1d8/×3) Full Attack: Rapier +3 melee (1d6+1/18–20) or longbow +3 ranged (1d8/×3) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Low-light vision Saves: Fort +3, Ref +2, Will –1 Abilities: Str 13, Dex 15, Con 12, Int 10, Wis 9, Cha 10 Skills: Listen +5, Move Silently +6 Feats: Weapon Finesse Environment: Warm plains Organization: Solitary or gang (2–5 plus 0–1 tigers) Challenge Rating: 1/2 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually chaotic neutral Advancement: By character class Level Adjustment: +1

Catfolk are territorial nomads of grassy plains, living in tribes segregated by their visual differences—some friendly to each other, others violently hostile. Some of the most plentiful catfolk are those with the characteristics of lions—males with their manes braided and hung with charms for luck in battle, and females with their tawny hides, sleek with muscle. Catfolk are sentient, and they wear the accoutrements of civilization, including belts. They can use tools and weapons. Despite their potential for raw power, many catfolk are slim and wiry, preferring weapons to match, such as the rapier. Other tribes of catfolk have characteristics of leopards, tigers, and cheetahs. The nomadic catfolk spirit moves many of them to wander into human lands, seeking after fame and adventure. More than one catfolk has become a trusted compatriot of an adventuring company otherwise made up of humans, elves, dwarves, and halflings. Catfolk speak Common and a language called Feline (each tribe speaking a dialect). Brighter catfolk often learn the languages of gnolls and halflings, who also live on the sunny grasslands.

Combat Catfolk are prone to leaping impulsively into combat. If combat turns against them, they don’t hesitate to bound away. Skills: Catfolk have a +2 racial bonus on Listen and Move Silently checks. The catfolk warrior presented here had the following ability scores before racial adjustments: Str 13, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 10, Wis 9, Cha 8.

Catfolk as Characters Catfolk excel as rangers or rogues. Catfolk characters possess the following racial traits.

Catfolk

56

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:36 PM Page 57

This low-slung beast is covered in bony plates of armor, studs, and spikes. It trails an armored tail ending in a massive club of bone.

CHAPTER 3:

CAVE DINOSAURS

Cave dinosaurs are smaller versions of their terrible cousins. The yuan-ti originally bred them as servants—more manageable servants than their full-sized cousins. Smaller than normal dinosaurs, cave dinosaurs are more maneuverable in the yuan-ti’s jungle homes as well as in the subterranean warrens in which they were created and which they prefer as their habitat. Most cave dinosaurs encountered by adventurers are the feral descendants of the yuan-ti’s domesticated stock. Like all dinosaurs, cave dinosaurs have sharp teeth, savage dispositions, a well-developed sense of territory, and a ruthless capacity to hunt. Herbivorous dinosaurs attack if startled, harassed, cornered, forced to defend their young, or “challenged” by an appraising look.

Feats: Alertness, Great Fortitude, Weapon Focus (tail) Environment: Underground Organization: Solitary or brood (2–8 plus 50% chance for 1 leader with 12 HD) Challenge Rating: 6 Treasure: None Alignment: Always neutral Advancement: 8–12 HD (Large); 13–21 HD (Huge) Level Adjustment: —

MONSTERS

— +4 Dexterity, +2 Charisma. —A catfolk’s base land speed is 40 feet. —Low-Light Vision: Catfolk can see twice as far as a human in starlight, moonlight, torchlight, and similar conditions of poor illumination. They retain the ability to distinguish color and detail under these conditions. —Racial Skills: Catfolk have a +2 racial bonus on Listen and Move Silently checks. — +1 natural armor bonus. —Automatic Languages: Common, Feline. Bonus Languages: Draconic, Gnoll, Halfling, Sylvan. —Favored Class: Ranger. —Level adjustment +1.

This dinosaur, built like a war machine, has stocky legs and a short, heavy body. All creatures know enough to give the cave anklyosaurus’s tail club a wide berth. A cave ankylosaurus has a body about 8 feet long and weighs about 500 pounds. Cave ankylosaurus

Illus. by S. Tappin

CAVE ANKYLOSAURUS Large Animal Hit Dice: 7d8+35 (66 hp) Initiative: –2 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares) Armor Class: 24 (–1 size, –2 Dex, +17 natural), touch 7, flat-footed 24 Base Attack/Grapple: +5/+14 Attack: Tail +10 melee (2d4+7) Full Attack: Tail +10 melee (2d4+7) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Trample 3d6+7 Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +12, Ref +3, Will +3 Abilities: Str 21, Dex 6, Con 21, Int 1, Wis 12, Cha 6 Skills: Listen +8, Spot +8

pqqqqrs CAVE DINOSAUR MUTATIONS As products of a yuan-ti breeding program, cave dinosaurs sometimes possess strange genetic traits, the result of partially successful breeding experiments. Not all cave dinosaurs have mutations. Among populations located close to the site of the yuan-ti breeding program, mutations may be very common. In populations further removed from the direct influence of the yuan-ti, mutations may be more rare, occurring in only a small percentage of all cave dinosaurs. The table below gives random mutations for cave dinosaurs. A few mutations make a significant difference in the level of threat posed by the mutated cave dinosaur. In these instances, as noted on the table, increase the Challenge Rating of the creature appropriately.

d% 01–10 11–20 21–30 31–40 41–50 51–60 61–65 66–70 71–75 76–80 81–85 86–90 91–100

Mutation Improved grab (with tail), constrict 1d6 + Str bonus Spell resistance 10 + HD Chameleon power (as yuan-ti) Produce acid (as yuan-ti) Poison (as yuan-ti) (+1 CR) Blind-Fight feat +6 Str +6 Con +6 Dex Resistance to electricity 20 and fire 20 Resistance to cold 20 and electricity 20 Resistance to cold 20 and fire 20 Wings, fly speed of 50 ft. (poor) (+1 CR)

pqqqqrs

57

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:36 PM Page 58

Combat

Trample (Ex): Reflex DC 18 half. The save DC is Strength-based.

A cave ankylosaurus blunders heedlessly into combat, sometimes blundering right through and over whatever threatens it. Trample (Ex): Reflex DC 18 half. The save DC is Strength-based.

CAVE TYRANNOSAURUS

Illus. by S. Tappin

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

CAVE TRICERATOPS Large Animal Hit Dice: 8d8+40 (76 hp) Initiative: –1 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares) Armor Class: 18 (–1 size, –1 Dex, +10 natural), touch 8, flat-footed 18 Base Attack/Grapple: +6/+14 Attack: Gore +10 melee (2d6+6) Full Attack: Gore +10 melee (2d6+6) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Powerful charge, trample 3d6+6 Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., scent Saves: Fort +13, Ref +5, Will +3 Abilities: Str 19, Dex 8, Con 21, Int 1, Wis 12, Cha 6 Skills: Listen +9, Spot +8 Feats: Alertness, Great Fortitude, Cave triceratops Weapon Focus (gore) Environment: Underground Organization: Solitary, brood (2–8 plus 50% chance for 1 leader with 12 HD) Challenge Rating: 5 Treasure: None Alignment: Always neutral Advancement: 9–12 HD (Large); 13–24 HD (Huge) Level Adjustment: — This bulky, four-legged beast has a huge front plate of bone protecting its reptilelike head, from which project two great horns. A shorter horn juts from its nose.

Combat

58

This 9-foot-tall reptilelike predator has a mouth full of gnashing teeth. It stands on two powerful legs and has only vestigial forelimbs.

This ravenous creature is the most fearsome of all cave dinosaurs. It is more than 13 feet long from nose to tail and weighs about 600 pounds. The cave tyrannosaurus is a swift runner with a voracious appetite. It is both a hunter and a scavenger, seeking carrion slain by other creatures.

Combat

Though an herbivore, the cave triceratops is short-tempered and aggressive. A head-on encounter with a bothered cave triceratops is something most creatures know enough to back down from. Its nose spike and armored head make it a deadly foe when it charges into combat. A cave triceratops has a body about 9 feet long and weighs about 600 pounds. A cave triceratops doesn’t fear combat, or much of anything. Unless it’s badly wounded, it prefers to trample creatures that disturb it underfoot. Powerful Charge (Ex): When a cave triceratops charges, its gore attack deals 4d6+12 points of damage.

Large Animal Hit Dice: 9d8+30 (70 hp) Initiative: +2 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) Armor Class: 15 (–1 size, +2 Dex, +4 natural), touch 11, flat-footed 13 Base Attack/Grapple: +6/+17 Attack: Bite +12 melee (2d6+10) Full Attack: Bite +12 (2d6+10) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Improved grab, swallow whole Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., scent Saves: Fort +9, Ref +8, Will +5 Abilities: Str 25, Dex 14, Con 17, Int 2, Wis 15, Cha 10 Skills: Listen +8, Spot +8, Survival +6 Feats: Alertness, Improved Natural Attack (bite), Toughness, Track Environment: Underground Organization: Solitary, pair, pack (3–8 plus 50% chance for 1 leader with 14 HD) Challenge Rating: 5 Treasure: None Alignment: Always neutral Advancement: 10–14 HD (Large); 15–27 HD (Huge) Level Adjustment: —

Cave tyrannosaurus

A hunter pure and simple, a cave tyrannosaurus is likely to attack Small creatures and retreat once it has secured a meal. Improved Grab (Ex): To use this ability, a cave tyrannosaurus must hit an opponent of up to one size smaller with its bite attack. It can then attempt to start a grapple as a free action without provoking an attack of opportunity. If it wins the grapple check, it establishes a hold and can try to swallow the foe in the following round. Swallow Whole (Ex): A cave tyrannosaurus can try to swallow a grabbed opponent of up to two sizes smaller by making a successful grapple check. A swallowed creature takes 2d6+7 points of bludgeoning

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:37 PM Page 59

damage and 6 points of acid damage per round from the cave tyrannosaurus’s gizzard. A swallowed creature can cut its way out by using a light slashing or piercing weapon to deal 20 points of damage to the gizzard (AC 12). Once the creature exits, muscular action closes the hole; another swallowed opponent must cut its own way out. A cave tyrannosaurus’s gizzard can hold 2 Small, 8 Tiny, or 32 Diminutive or smaller opponents.

Black Dragon

MONSTERS

Comfortable in the brutal heat of the desert, battle-hardened crucians rely on their natural shell armor to protect them in all situations. Crucians are humanoids that sport broad, flat shells, like desert crabs, encompassing their upper bodies in natural protection. Not content with just their shells, they often sport additional leather chaps and armlets to protect the rest of their bodies. They decorate their shells with brightly colored painted sigils, as well as deeply etched tallies of their personal triumphs on the sandy field of conflict. Most crucians prefer to wield enormous battlehammers, weighted to crack even the hardest enemy shells. Crucians are highly territorial, and they organize into small bands, each group protecting a prized water source. Crucian bands regularly raid one another’s oases, which accounts for

their warlike demeanor. Every twenty years or so, a leader rises among the crucians and forges the various bands into a mighty force. This crucian army strikes out into cooler lands for booty and conquest, only to fall back into the desert once the creatures have wreaked their fill of misery. In negotiations, crucians are known to be cunning. They often employ verbal feints to draw others out and get a better read on them, and they are keenly interested in figuring out how both friends and enemies think. Crucians speak Common and Draconic. More intelligent crucians learn Sphinx, the language of the creatures that share their desert homes.

Black Dragon illus. by D. Hanley Crucian illus. by S. Tappin

A crablike shell covers the upper body of this otherwise humanoid form. Its shell is heavily inscribed and painted, and it wears simple equipment and clothing.

CHAPTER 3:

CRUCIAN

Medium Humanoid (Reptilian) Hit Dice: 3d8+9 (22 hp) Initiative: –1 Speed: 20 ft. (4 squares) Armor Class: 21 (–1 Dex, +8 natural, +2 leather, +2 heavy shield), touch 9, flat-footed 21 Base Attack/Grapple: +2/+4 Attack: Warhammer +5 melee (1d8+2/×3) Full Attack: Warhammer +5 melee (1d8+2/×3) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Low-light vision Saves: Fort +6, Ref +0, Will +3 Abilities: Str 15, Dex 8, Con 17, Int 11, Wis 10, Cha 8 Skills: Diplomacy +1, Sense Motive +5, Spot +5 Feats: Iron Will, Weapon Focus (warhammer) Environment: Warm deserts Organization: Pair, crew (2–5 plus 50% chance for 1 4th-level leader), squad (5–10 plus 1 4th-level leader plus 50% chance for 1 5th-level leader) Challenge Rating: 2 Treasure: 50% coins; double goods, 50% items Alignment: Usually lawful neutral Advancement: By character class Level Adjustment: +2

Combat When they can, crucians prefer to attack as a solid line to prevent enemies from getting at their flanks.

Crucian Characters A crucian’s favored class is druid; most crucian leaders are druids. Crucian

59

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:37 PM Page 60

Illus. by D. Hanley

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

CURSED SPIRIT

Medium Undead (Incorporeal) Hit Dice: 3d12+3 (22 hp) Initiative: +2 Speed: Fly 30 ft. (perfect) (6 squares) Armor Class: 13 (+2 Dex, +1 deflection), touch 13, flat-footed 11 Base Attack/Grapple: +1/ — Attack: Incorporeal touch +3 melee (1d8+1) Full Attack: Incorporeal touch +3 melee (1d8+1) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Accursed touch, curse aura Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., incorporeal traits, undead traits Saves: Fort +1, Ref +3, Will +2 Abilities: Str —, Dex 14, Con —, Int 9, Wis 8, Cha 13 Skills: Intimidate +7, Listen +5, Spot +5 Feats: Toughness, Weapon Finesse Environment: Any Organization: Solitary or gang (2–5) Challenge Rating: 3 Treasure: None Alignment: Always chaotic evil Advancement: 4–8 HD (Medium) Level Adjustment: +5

Medium Magical Beast Hit Dice: 2d10+8 (19 hp) Initiative: +1 Speed: 20 ft. (4 squares), climb 10 ft., swim 10 ft. Armor Class: 13 (+1 Dex, +2 natural), touch 11, flat-footed 12 Base Attack/Grapple: +2/+5 Attack: Bite +5 melee (1d6+4) Full Attack: Bite +5 melee (1d6+4) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., displacement, low-light vision Saves: Fort +7, Ref +4, Will +3 Abilities: Str 17, Dex 12, Con 19, Int 5, Wis 12, Cha 2 Skills: Climb +11, Listen +6, Swim +11 Feats: Iron Will Environment: Warm forests Organization: Solitary, pair, brood (2–7 plus 0, 1, or 2 leaders with 4 HD) Challenge Rating: 2 Treasure: 50% coins; triple goods, 50% items Cursed spirit Alignment: Usually chaotic evil Advancement: 3–5 HD (Medium); 6 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: —

This creature’s tormented, immaterial form suggests terrible loss. Its upper body is distinct, with a manic humanoid form, but its lower body blurs into a ghostly cloud. Its hollow eyes convey malevolent intelligence.

This snake has luxurious scales of deep blue-black, except for two stripes of violet color that almost seem to hover over the creature’s body. It never quite seems to be located exactly where it should be.

The displacer serpent is a ravenous and furtive carnivore that resembles a snake. It has glowing green eyes, and two vibrant stripes of vibrant, glowing violet running down its body. Displacer serpents pursue small prey but do not disdain going after larger meals. Any other living creature is a potential meal, so displacer serpents live in a world of neverending plenty. A displacer serpent is about 8 feet long and weighs about 200 pounds. Displacer serpents speak Draconic, but poorly.

Those who die while under terrible curses or inimical enchantments sometimes linger on as cursed spirits, bringing their misfortune to others. Evil clerics send cursed spirits to fight enemy combatants. The presence of a cursed spirit weakens the enemies’ defenses against spells and other special attack types. A cursed spirit speaks the languages it spoke in life. One is often heard predicting doom for those it is trying to slay.

Combat

Combat

60

The cursed spirit is cunning enough to ambush enemies though walls, floors, and ceilings. Accursed Touch (Su): A cursed spirit adds its Charisma modifier to damage dealt by its incorporeal touch attack. Curse Aura (Su): The taint of loss surrounds a cursed spirit. Adjacent enemy creatures take a –2 penalty on all saving throws.

DISPLACER SERPENT

Orc Warrior

Displacer serpents are unexceptional in their tactics, lashing out when hungry or bored, slithering away when hurt or scared. Displacement (Su): A light-bending glamer continually surrounds a displacer serpent, making it difficult to surmise the creature’s true location. Any melee or ranged attack directed at it has a 50% miss chance unless the attacker can locate the serpent by some means other than sight. A true seeing effect

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:54 PM Page 61

Alignment: Often lawful evil Advancement: By character class Level Adjustment: +2 This humanlike creature stands almost 11 feet tall and has a head and legs like those of a horse. It wears heavy armor and wields a mighty axe of curious design.

Displacer serpent

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

Equicephs are merciless and relentless slavers, raiding out of their forest homes to take captives. They often raid nearby hills to capture hobgoblins, which are accustomed to following orders and are small enough for equicephs to push around. But equicephs aren’t picky. They’ll make slaves of any creatures that they can catch and coerce. The equicephs are long-lost remnants of a distant, peaceful civilization. This ancient society maintained the peace by exiling its worst criminals to a land across the sea. The equicephs are the descendants of these cruel lawbreakers. They retain the superior intellect and insight of their ancestors, though they apply their gifts to villainy rather than to harmony. Whether the peaceful equiceph society still survives somewhere over the horizon or has long ago fallen is a disputed matter of legend. Equicephs speak Common and Sylvan.

Combat

Illus. by S. Tappin

allows the user to see the serpent’s position, but see invisibility has no effect. Skills: A displacer serpent has a +8 racial bonus on Climb checks and can always choose to take 10 on Climb checks, even if rushed or threatened. It also has a +8 racial bonus on any Swim check to perform some special action or avoid a hazard. It can always choose to take 10 on a Swim check, even if distracted or endangered. It can use the run action while swimming, provided it swims in a straight line.

Equicephs use feints and pincer maneuvers to get the better of their enemies in combat. They rehearse their tactics ahead of time so they can work together fluidly when facing opponents While they value slaves as property, they routinely sacrifice them in

EQUICEPH

Large Monstrous Humanoid Hit Dice: 4d8+4 (22 hp) Initiative: +0 Speed: 30 ft. in splint mail (6 squares); base speed 40 ft. Armor Class: 20 (–1 size, +5 natural, +6 splint mail), touch 9, flat-footed 20 Base Attack/Grapple: +4/+12 Attack: Greataxe +8 melee (3d6+6/×3) or javelin +3 ranged (1d8+4) Full Attack: Greataxe +8 melee (3d6+6/×3) or javelin +3 ranged (1d8+4) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., low-light vision Saves: Fort +2, Ref +4, Will +7 Abilities: Str 18, Dex 11, Con 12, Int 11, Wis 13, Cha 12 Skills: Intimidate +8, Survival +8 Feats: EnduranceB, Iron Will, Weapon Focus (greataxe) Environment: Temperate forests Organization: Solitary, slave band (1 plus 2–8 hobgoblin warriors [slaves]), or gang (2–6) Challenge Rating: 3 Treasure: Standard

Equiceph

61

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:55 PM Page 62

crafty gambits that enable the equicephs to gain the upper hand in battle.

Equiceph Characters An equiceph’s favored class is ranger; most equiceph leaders are rangers.

Illus. by S. Tappin

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

GRAVEHOUND

Medium Undead Hit Dice: 4d12 (26 hp) Initiative: +6 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) Armor Class: 15 (+2 Dex, +3 natural), touch 12, flatfooted 13 Base Attack/Grapple: +2/+5 Attack: Bite +6 melee (1d6+4 plus stun) Full Attack: Bite +6 melee (1d6+4 plus stun) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Stunning strike Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., scent, +2 turn resistance, undead traits Gravehound Saves: Fort +1, Ref +3, Will +7 Abilities: Str 17, Dex 14, Con —, Int 4, Wis 17, Cha 19 Skills: Listen +10 Feats: Improved Initiative, Weapon Focus (bite) Environment: Any Organization: Solitary, gang (2–5 plus 50% chance for 1 leader with 8 HD), or pack (5–10 plus 1–2 leaders with 8 HD) Challenge Rating: 3 Treasure: None Alignment: Always neutral evil Advancement: 5–6 HD (Medium); 7–12 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: — This canine creature moves with a predatory grace belied by its rotting, fleshy body. Patches of shaggy hair grow over much of its body, between areas where the flesh has sloughed off because of rot or from the hapless attempts of prey to beat back the hound’s attack.

Canines who live not, but are not dead, gravehounds hunger for flesh enough to sate their never-ending appetites. A gravehound resembles a decomposing canine of exceptional size. It bounds and dashes, thrusting its toothy muzzle forward, always sniffing for fresh prey or decomposing flesh—a gravehound is not particular about what it eats. Gravehounds sometimes rise from the corpses of wild dogs who have scavenged the bodies of humanoids that were improperly buried; the site of a mass grave is one of the gravehounds’ favorite feeding grounds. Gravehounds do not speak or understand any language—they just eat.

62

Combat Driven by hunger, a gravehound launches itself at a likely meal with unholy fury. The foulness of its bite can overwhelm its prey, preventing a stricken creature from defending itself. Stunning Strike (Su): A creature hit by a gravehound’s bite must succeed on a DC 16 Fortitude save or be stunned for 1 round. The save DC is Charisma-based. Undead Traits: A gravehound is immune to mind-affecting effects, poison, sleep effects, paralysis, stunning, disease, death effects, and any effect that requires a Fortitude save unless the effect also works on objects or is harmless. It is not subject to critical hits, nonlethal damage, damage to its physical ability scores, ability drain, energy drain, fatigue, exhaustion, or death from massive damage. It cannot be raised, and resurrection works only if it is willing.

KRUTHIK

Fast-moving beasts covered with chitin plates, kruthiks are ferocious predators armed with scythelike limbs. Kruthiks seem to have originated during a process of magical experimentation, possibly an attempt to add insectoid and infernal enhancements to a deinonychus or similar reptile. In temperament, kruthiks certainly take after the devils who are said to be their creators. The insect heritage of the kruthik is most apparent in its life cycle: A hatchling undergoes two stages of metamorphosis before reaching maturity. Except during the brief periods it spends cocooned, a kruthik is deadly in every stage of its life. Kruthiks speak a grunting dialect of Infernal.

Combat All three stages of kruthiks are ferocious fighters, leaping into battle to rend foes or prey with their scythelike foreclaws. The keen edges of their claws are especially dangerous. Keen Scent (Ex): A kruthik can notice creatures by scent in a 180-foot radius.

HATCHLING KRUTHIK Small Magical Beast Hit Dice: 4d10+4 (26 hp) Initiative: +6 Speed: 50 ft. (10 squares) AC: 19 (+1 size, +6 Dex, +2 natural), touch 17, flat-footed 13 Base Attack/Grapple: +4/+1 Attack: Claw +11 melee (1d6+1) Full Attack: 2 claws +11 melee (1d6+1) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., keen scent, low-light vision

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:55 PM Page 63

In general shape, this creature resembles a six-limbed canine—but there the resemblance ends. Its body is covered with armored plates of chitin and four of its limbs are like long, razor-sharp scythes. It holds two smaller claws close to its body. Its head combines the facial features of a predatory reptile with large, serrated mandibles. Large armored plates protect its neck and back. Small, veined wings like those of a dragonfly sprout from behind the plates.

MONSTERS

Saves: Fort +5, Ref +10, Will +2 Abilities: Str 13, Dex 22, Con 13, Int 4, Wis 13, Cha 10 Skills: Hide +17*, Jump +17, Listen +4, Move Silently +13, Spot +3 Feats: Alertness, Weapon Finesse Climate/Terrain: Warm plains Organization: Solitary or pack (2–8) Challenge Rating: 2 Treasure: None Alignment: Usually lawful evil Advancement: 5 HD (Small) Level Adjustment: —

CHAPTER 3:

Full Attack: 2 claws +12 melee (1d10+3) and bite +7 melee (1d4+1); or 2 spikes +12 ranged (1d6+3) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Spikes Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., keen scent, low-light vision Saves: Fort +7, Ref +11, Will +3 Abilities: Str 17, Dex 22, Con 15, Int 4, Wis 13, Cha 10 Skills: Hide +13*, Listen +4, Move Silently +13 Feats: Point Blank Shot, Precise Shot, Weapon Finesse Climate/Terrain: Warm plains Organization: Solitary or pack (2–8) Challenge Rating: 4 Treasure: None Alignment: Usually lawful evil Advancement: 7 HD (Medium) Level Adjustment: —

Hatchling kruthik

This creature resembles a huge, six-limbed canine, as big as a strong man. Its body is covered with thick plates of chitin, and four of its limbs are like long, serrated scythes adorned with vicious spikes. It holds two smaller claws close to its body. Its head combines the facial features of a predatory reptile with spiked and serrated mandibles. A frill of armored plates protects its neck and back. A thick growth of spines sprouts from behind this frill.

After one to three years as a hatchling, a kruthik surrounds itself in a slimy, hard coating of lurid green chitin. Two or three weeks later it emerges as an adult. An adult kruthik is 6 feet long and weighs around 250 pounds.

Combat

Adult kruthik

Hatchling kruthiks are anything but helpless larvae. They are small and wiry, about 4 feet long and weighing 30 pounds.

Combat Hatchlings make excellent use of their speed and agility in combat, encircling prey and outrunning any serious threats. Skills: A hatchling’s small wings give it a +8 racial bonus on Jump checks, though it cannot actually use the wings to fly. Kruthiks have a +4 racial bonus on Hide and Move Silently checks. *In areas of natural vegetation, the bonus on Hide checks increases to +8.

Adults, though larger than hatchlings, are no less agile, and their heavier chitin makes them even harder to kill. Their bites are more effective weapons, and they can actually hurl their spines at foes who manage to remain out of reach. Spikes (Ex): When an adult kruthik raises the frill of plates on its back, its spines also stand erect. With a snap, the creature can loose one spike as a standard action or a volley of two as a fullround action (make an attack roll for each spike). This Greater kruthik attack has a range of 100 feet with no range increment.

ADULT KRUTHIK Medium Magical Beast Hit Dice: 6d10+12 (45 hp) Initiative: +6 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) AC: 22 (+6 Dex, +6 natural), touch 16, flat-footed 16 Base Attack/Grapple: +6/+9 Attack: Claw +12 melee (1d10+3) or spike +12 ranged (1d6+3)

63

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:55 PM Page 64

If loosing a volley of spikes against two targets, the targets must be within 30 feet of each other. The creature can launch up to twelve spikes in any 24-hour period. Skills: Kruthiks have a +4 racial bonus on Hide and Move Silently checks. *In areas of natural vegetation, the bonus on Hide checks increases to +8.

Combat

Illus. by S. Tappin

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

GREATER KRUTHIK Large Magical Beast Hit Dice: 8d10+32 (76 hp) Initiative: +5 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) AC: 25 (–1 size, +5 Dex, +11 natural), touch 14, flat-footed 20 Base Attack/Grapple: +8/+19 Attack: Claw +16 melee (2d6+7/19–20 plus 2d4 acid) Full Attack: 2 claws +15 melee (2d6+7/19–20 plus 2d4 acid) and bite +9 melee (1d6+3 plus 2d4 acid) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Rake 2d4+3/19–20 plus 2d4 acid Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., keen scent, low-light vision, resistance to acid 10 Saves: Fort +10, Ref +11, Will +3 Abilities: Str 25, Dex 20, Con 19, Int 4, Wis 13, Cha 10 Skills: Hide +9*, Listen +4, Move Silently +13 Feats: Improved Critical (claw), Power Attack, Weapon Focus (claw) Climate/Terrain: Warm plains Organization: Solitary or pack (2–8) Challenge Rating: 6 Treasure: None Mad slasher Alignment: Usually lawful evil Advancement: 9–12 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: — This creature resembles a gigantic, six-limbed predatory lizard, bigger than a large tiger. Its body is covered with thick plates of chitin, and four of its limbs are like long, serrated scythes adorned with vicious spikes and dripping a bright blue secretion. Two smaller claws dangle between the other sets of legs, scraping at the air. Its head combines the facial features of a predatory reptile with huge, spike-covered mandibles. A frill of armored plates protects its neck and back. A thick growth of spines sprouts from behind this frill.

Not all adult kruthiks undergo further metamorphosis, because many die before they are ready to advance to their final life stage, which usually requires an adult to live five to ten years. Those that do become greater kruthiks spend a full four weeks in a dull gray-blue chrysalis before emerging in a larger and more advanced state. Because of its extra bulk, a greater kruthik is not able to use its spikes for attacking as an adult can. A greater kruthik is about 16 feet long and weighs 2,000 pounds or more.

64

Greater kruthiks are amazingly agile for their size, and rely almost equally on brute strength and quick movement to annihilate their prey. Their smaller inner claws are larger and more useful than those of the kruthik’s earlier stages, though the creature can make them useful in combat only when grappling. Rake (Ex): Two claws, attack bonus +15 melee, damage 2d4+3/19–20 plus 2d4 acid. Skills: Kruthiks have a +4 racial bonus on Hide and Move Silently checks. *In areas of natural vegetation, the bonus on Hide checks increases to +8.

MAD SLASHER

Medium Aberration Hit Dice: 4d8+8 (26 hp) Initiative: +3 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) Armor Class: 15 (+3 Dex, +2 natural), touch 13, flat-footed 12 Base Attack/Grapple: +3/+4 Attack: Claw +6 melee (1d8+1) Full Attack: 2 claws +6 melee (1d8+1) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +3, Ref +4, Will +4 Abilities: Str 13, Dex 17, Con 15, Int 6, Wis 10, Cha 6 Skills: Survival +7 Feats: Combat Reflexes, Weapon Finesse, Whirlwind AttackB Environment: Warm forests Organization: Solitary, cluster (2–5), or nest (5–10 plus 1–2 leaders with 6 HD) Challenge Rating: 2 Treasure: 1/10 coins; 50% goods; 50% items Alignment: Usually chaotic evil Advancement: 5–6 HD (Medium); 7–12 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: —

A grotesque, misshapen head that consists mostly of a single blinking eye is supported by six long, slender, spiketipped limbs.

The mad slasher is a whirling dervish of death. It walks on two or three of its strange spike-tipped limbs, pushing itself along at a reasonable clip while keeping its head low to the ground. When it fights, its limbs rise and slash like whips, bringing its spikes to bear in a terrible whirlwind of tearing flesh. Mad slashers absorb food through small, mouthlike runnels on the underside of their limbs. They emit from their runnels a horrible tittering, which becomes louder and more frenetic the more blood the slashers spill. Mad slashers do not speak.

Combat Mad slashers become agitated at the promise of bloodshed and scuttle into combat to attack as many enemies at once as possible.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:56 PM Page 65

MAGMA HURLER

A magma hurler is an elemental composed of molten stone, combining the elements of earth and fire. It stands 6 to 8 feet tall and weighs 400 to 500 pounds.

This hunched creature has a single huge eye that dominates its entire face. Its body is bloated and misshapen, and its limbs are wiry but strong. Its arms end in claws that reach the ground as it moves in an awkward hop.

Nothics are twisted aberrations that live in deep subterranean caves and ruins, feasting on the flesh of any living creature they can catch. Nothics speak Undercommon in hoarse, wheezing voices.

Combat

Combat A magma hurler’s name is derived from its ability to spit forth a ball of magma into its scooplike hand, then hurl it to devastating effect. It is slow-moving and bereft of intellect, and it frequently hurls its magma rocks on a whim. It dislikes melee combat and tries to avoid combatants who move to engage it. Magma Rock (Ex): A magma hurler can spit forth a ball of molten rock into its hand as a move action, as often as once per round. It can throw a magma rock with a range increment of 30 feet (maximum range 150 feet).

MONSTERS

A cloud of black smoke roils upward from this creature, which seems to be formed entirely of molten lava. Its skin is a hardened black crust, but its joints and gaping mouth reveal glowing red magma inside. Jagged protrusions line its hunched shoulders, belching forth smoke. Its arms end in flattened hooks, almost like scoops.

NOTHIC

Medium Aberration Hit Dice: 5d8+20 (42 hp) Initiative: +5 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares) AC: 15 (+1 Dex, +4 natural), touch 11, flat-footed 14 Base Attack/Grapple: +3/+7 Attack: Claw +7 melee (1d4+4) Full Attack: 2 claws +7 melee (1d4+4) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Flesh-rotting gaze Special Qualities: Darkvision 120 ft., see invisibility Saves: Fort +5, Ref +2, Will +7 Abilities: Str 18, Dex 12, Con 19, Int 9, Wis 13, Cha 8 Skills: Spot +13 Feats: Improved Initiative, Iron Will Environment: Underground Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 3 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually evil (any) Advancement: 6–8 HD (Medium); 9–15 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: +3

CHAPTER 3:

Medium Elemental (Earth, Extraplanar, Fire) Hit Dice: 4d8+28 (46 hp) Initiative: +1 Speed: 20 ft. (4 squares) AC: 15 (+1 Dex, +4 natural), touch 11, flat-footed 14 Base Attack/Grapple: +3/+11 Attack: Magma rock +5 ranged (3d10+8 plus 1d6 fire) or slam +11 melee (1d6+12) Full Attack: Magma rock +5 ranged (3d10+8 plus 1d6 fire) or slam +11 melee (1d6+12) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Magma rock Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., elemental traits, immunity to fire, vulnerability to cold Saves: Fort +11, Ref +5, Will +4 Abilities: Str 26, Dex 13, Con 24, Int 7, Wis 12, Cha 11 Skills: Listen +5, Spot +4 Feats: Iron Will, Weapon Focus (magma rock) Environment: Elemental Plane of Fire Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 3 Treasure: None Alignment: Usually chaotic evil Magma hurler Advancement: 5–6 HD (Medium); 7–12 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: —

Elemental Traits: A magma hurler has immunity to poison, sleep effects, paralysis, and stunning. It is not subject to critical hits or flanking. It cannot be raised, reincarnated, or resurrected (though a limited wish, wish, miracle, or true resurrection spell can restore life).

Nothic

A nothic’s claws are weak, and it is not exceptionally fast. Since it’s perfectly happy eating carrion, it relies on its gaze to disable victims before moving in for a meal. Flesh-Rotting Gaze (Su): Deals 1d6 damage, 30 feet, Will DC 16 negates. The save DC is Constitution-based. See Invisibility (Su): A nothic can see invisible and ethereal creatures as though constantly under the effect of a see invisibility spell. Skills: Nothics have a +4 racial bonus on Spot checks.

65

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:56 PM Page 66

CHAPTER 3:

action) before attacking. It slices its prey with its armblades and feasts on the spot before rolling on to find new prey. Armblade Shields (Ex): A phargion’s two armblades provide a +1 shield bonus to its Armor Class, as though it were using weapons and had the Two-Weapon Defense feat. Rapid Movement (Ex): A phargion can roll itself into a wheel as a free action or unroll as a move action. As a wheel, its speed increases to 40 feet (Jump bonus improves to +7). A phargion cannot attack while in this form but gains a +4 bonus to Armor Class.

MONSTERS

PROTECTAR

Phargion

Protectar illus. by A. Smith

PHARGION

Medium Magical Beast Hit Dice: 10d10+20 (75 hp) Initiative: +3 Speed: 10 ft. (2 squares); 40 ft. when rolled up AC: 18 (+3 Dex, +4 natural, +1 shield [armblades]), touch 13, flat-footed 15; 22, touch 17, flat-footed 19 when rolled up Base Attack/Grapple: +10/+11 Attack: Armblade +12 melee (1d6+1) Full Attack: 2 armblades +12 melee (1d6+1) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Armblade shields, darkvision 60 ft., lowlight vision, rapid movement Saves: Fort +9, Ref +10, Will +5 Abilities: Str 13, Dex 17, Con 14, Int 5, Wis 14, Cha 8 Skills: Balance +10, Jump –9, Tumble +11 Feats: Dodge, Endurance, Mobility, Weapon Focus (armblade) Environment: Temperate plains Organization: Solitary or flock (2–12) Challenge Rating: 5 Treasure: None Alignment: Usually neutral Advancement: 11–15 HD (Medium); 16–30 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: —

Medium Outsider (Extraplanar, Good) Hit Dice: 2d8+4 (13 hp) Initiative: +1 Speed: 20 ft. (4 squares), fly 40 ft. (good) in breastplate; base land speed 30 ft., base fly speed 60 ft. (good) Armor Class: 18 (+1 Dex, +5 breastplate, +2 heavy shield), touch 11, flat-footed 17 Base Attack/Grapple: +2/+4 Attack: Longsword +4 melee (1d8+2/19–20) Full Attack: Longsword +4 melee (1d8+2/19–20) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft, spell-like abilities, tongues Saves: Fort +5, Ref +4, Will +4 Abilities: Str 15, Dex 12, Con 15, Int 10, Wis 12, Cha 15 Skills: Concentration +7, Diplomacy +9, Heal +6, Knowledge (the planes) +5, Knowledge (religion) +5, Listen +6, Sense Motive +6, Spot +6, Survival +1 (+3 on other planes)

This creature resembles nothing so much as a wheel that has rolled itself open to reveal a pair of clawed legs and arms. Its forearms are covered with sharp-looking shield-blades. Its head and back are covered with plates of chitin, and its head resembles that of an infernal insect with a skull-like appearance.

A phargion has a unique method of locomotion: It literally rolls itself into a wheel and propels itself along the ground with its armblades, achieving remarkable speed across level terrain.

Combat

66

A phargion rolls its way into combat but unrolls (as a move

Protectar

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:57 PM Page 67

Feats: Combat Casting Environment: Any good-aligned plane Organization: Solitary or team (2–5 plus 50% chance for 1 ramadeen) Challenge Rating: 2 Treasure: No coins; double goods; standard items Alignment: Always good (any) Advancement: 3–5 HD (Medium); 6 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: +3

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

Looking much like a tall, beautiful human with long, feathery wings, this creature is attired in elegant white robes and wears a white breastplate.

Like angels, protectars exude goodness—they are natural enemies of fiends (creatures of the infernal realms). Protectars do not lie, cheat, or steal. They are faultlessly moral in all their dealings, and are generally more concerned with the welfare of mortals than other celestials. Their graceful bodies and elaborate dress mark protectars as support combatants; protectars are caregivers first and combatants second. Protectars speak Celestial, Draconic, and Infernal, though they can communicate with almost any creature thanks to their tongues ability.

Combat

RAMADEEN

Large Outsider (Extraplanar, Good, Lawful) Hit Dice: 4d8+12 (30 hp) Initiative: +1 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) Armor Class: 18 (–1 size, +1 Dex, +2 natural, +4 chain shirt, +2 heavy shield), touch 10, flat-footed 17 Base Attack/Grapple: +4/+13 Attack: Masterwork scimitar +10 melee (1d8+5/18–20) Full Attack: Masterwork scimitar +10 melee (1d8+5/18–20) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Smite evil Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/magic, darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +7, Ref +5, Will +6 Abilities: Str 21, Dex 12, Con 17, Int 12, Wis 14, Cha 17 Skills: Diplomacy +12, Heal +9, Intimidate +10, Jump +7, Knowledge (the planes) +8, Knowledge (religion) +8, Listen +9, Sense Motive +9, Spot +9, Survival +2 (+4 on other planes), Tumble +4 Feats: Power Attack, Powerful ChargeB, Weapon Focus (scimitar) Environment: Seven Mounting Heavens of Celestia Organization: Solitary, team (1 plus 2–5 protectars), or cadre (2–6 plus 0–4 protectars) Challenge Rating: 4 Treasure: Double items

Ramadeen

Alignment: Always lawful good Advancement: 5–7 HD (Large); 8–12 HD (Huge) Level Adjustment: +5

Illus. by A. Smith

Protectars prefer to support their allies in combat by healing them rather than by fighting alongside them. They take the fight to the enemy if that’s what it takes to protect or best support their allies, though. A protectar’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as good-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction. Spell-Like Abilities: At will—tongues; 3/day—cure light wounds (DC 13). Caster level 2nd. The save DC is Charismabased.

This proud, well-muscled creature stands 9 feet tall. It has the body of a humanoid, with the shapely head of a powerful horned ram. It wears glinting and decorated armor and carries a finely crafted weapon.

Hulking prodigies of muscle and skill, ramadeens fill the ranks of many armies aligned with the forces of good. Ramadeens appear as well-muscled, finely armored giant humanoids with the heads of noble rams. Their chainmail shines with the light of heaven, and their shields bear the devices of heavenly patrons. They wield finely honed scimitars of iron quarried from Mount Celestia. Though they are warriors through and through, ramadeens are knowledgeable about the planes and the powers that reside therein, and they apply diplomacy when the sword blade would be too brutish. They even have some knowledge of healing techniques. Ramadeens are well-rounded creatures capable of holding their own both on the battlefield and in learned conversation. Ramadeens speak Celestial, Common, and Infernal.

Combat Ramadeens barge into combat when they get the chance. They are careful to pick their battles but relentless once they’ve selected an enemy. A ramadeen’s natural weapons, as well as any weapons it wields, are treated as good-aligned and lawful-aligned for the purpose of overcoming damage reduction.

67

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:57 PM Page 68

Smite Evil (Su): Once per day a ramadeen can make a normal melee attack to deal an extra 4 points of damage against an evil foe.

Illus. by A. Smith

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

SCALED STALKER

Large Monstrous Humanoid Hit Dice: 8d8+24 (60 hp) Initiative: +0 Speed: 30 ft. in breastplate (6 squares); base land speed 40 ft. Armor Class: 23 (–1 size, +7 natural, +5 breastplate, +2 heavy shield), touch 9, flat-footed 23 Base Attack/Grapple: +8/+16 Attack: Masterwork longsword +13 melee (2d6+4/19–20) or sling +7 ranged (1d6+4) Full Attack: Masterwork longsword +13/+8 melee (2d6+4/19–20) or sling +7 ranged (1d6+4) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft. Saves: Fort +7, Ref +6, Will +7 Abilities: Str 19, Dex 10, Con 17, Int 11, Wis 8, Cha 8 Skills: Balance +0, Climb +11, Intimidate +10, Jump +4, Swim +0 Feats: Great Fortitude, Iron Will, Weapon Focus (longsword) Environment: Warm plains Organization: Solitary or gang (2–7 plus 0–3 triceratopses) Challenge Rating: 5 Treasure: Standard Alignment: Usually lawful evil

Advancement: By character class Level Adjustment: +2 This bulky humanoid creature is covered in grotesque scales, bony ridges, and disturbing spines. A spiked tail drags along behind it. Despite its natural protection, it wears forged armor as well.

Scaled stalkers are large, horribly spiny creatures whose way of life is continuous pillaging. Adult stalkers stand 10 to 11 feet tall and weigh 700 to 900 pounds. Scaled stalkers join bands and armies of evil creatures to enhance their ability to wage terror and gain booty. Stalkers make excellent paid mercenaries, because they follow orders and do not flinch at atrocity. Vicious and vindictive, scaled stalkers slay those who gainsay them; those they fear to challenge outright they plot against in secret. The great scaly hides of these creatures are useful for reflecting heat, and so scaled stalkers sometimes are found in tribal groups in warm plains and desert areas. They are often at odds with catfolk and crucians in these environments. Scaled stalkers speak Giant and sometimes Common.

Combat Trained as mercenaries, scaled stalkers are pragmatic about combat, perhaps even businesslike. Still, they take pride—and perverse joy—in their business. Skills: Thanks to their tails, scaled stalkers have a +4 racial bonus on Balance, Jump, and Swim checks.

SHADOW BEAST

Though they are called fiends and are usually evil, shadow beasts actually hail from the Plane of Shadow, not the Lower Planes whence come most fiends. There they serve powerful warlords— cloakers, nightshades, dread wraiths, and humanoids who have made their homes on that plane of darkness. They are equally happy to come to the Material Plane as mercenaries or regular soldiers in the hire of an evil lord. On their native plane, the three varieties of shadow beast do not war against one another, but neither will they serve in the same company of soldiers. They do sometimes work together when serving on the Material Plane; in particular, the khumats seem able to cooperate with either of the other two varieties. All shadow beasts speak Abyssal, Common, and Infernal.

GHIRRASH

68

Scaled stalker

Large Outsider (Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 7d8+21 (52 hp) Initiative: +7 Speed: 50 ft. (10 squares) AC: 20 (–1 size, +3 Dex, +8 natural), touch 12, flat-footed 17 Base Attack/Grapple: +7/+17 Attack: Claw +13 melee (1d6+6) Full Attack: 4 claws +13 melee (1d6+6) and bite +7 melee (1d4+3 plus paralysis) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Paralysis, pounce, rake 1d6+3 Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/magic, darkvision 60 ft., displacement, immunity to poison, resistance to acid 10, cold 10, electricity 10, and fire 10, spell resistance 14 Saves: Fort +8, Ref +10, Will +6 Abilities: Str 23, Dex 16, Con 16, Int 13, Wis 12, Cha 15

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:58 PM Page 69

This creature appears at first glance like a tiger or large panther with six limbs. Its face combines humanoid features with those of a big cat, and its expression is unmistakably malevolent.

Large Outsider (Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 11d8+44 (93 hp) Initiative: +5 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares), swim 45 ft. AC: 26 (–1 size, +1 Dex, +16 natural), touch 10, flat-footed 25 Base Attack/Grapple: +11/+23 Attack: Bite +18 melee (2d8+12) or tail slap +18 melee (1d12+12) Full Attack: Bite +18 melee (2d8+12) or tail slap +18 melee (1d12+12) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Improved grab Special Qualities: Damage reduction 10/magic, darkvision 60 ft., immunity to Khumat poison, resistance to acid 10, cold 10, electricity 10, and fire 10, spell resistance 15 Saves: Fort +11, Ref +8, Will +10 Abilities: Str 26, Dex 13, Con 19, Int 8, Wis 13, Cha 8 Skills: Hide +11, Listen +15, Move Silently +15, Search +13, Spot +15, Survival +15 (+17 following tracks), Swim +30 Feats: Improved Initiative, Improved Sunder, Iron Will, Power Attack Climate/Terrain: Plane of Shadow Organization: Solitary, squad (2–4), or company (5–20) Challenge Rating: 8 Treasure: No coins; 50% goods; standard items Alignment: Always neutral evil Advancement: 12–16 HD (Large); 17–33 HD (Huge) Level Adjustment: +6

All of a ghirrash’s six limbs are weapons of terrible destructive power. It slinks quickly on all six legs, but stands erect, to its full 7-foot height, when fighting. It weighs about 500 pounds.

Combat A ghirrash stalks on all six limbs and fights standing on its hind legs so as to bring more claws to bear. Pouncing or grappling, it can attack with all six sharp claws, stripping flesh from bone with delight. Paralysis (Su): A creature hit by a ghirrash’s bite attack must make a DC 16 Fortitude save or be paralyzed for 1d4+1 rounds. Elves have immunity to this paralysis. The save DC is Constitution-based. Pounce (Ex): If a ghirrash charges, it can make a full attack, including two rake attacks.

KHUMAT

MONSTERS

Rake (Ex): Two claws, attack bonus +13 melee, damage 1d6+3. Displacement (Su): A light-bending glamer continually surrounds a ghirrash, making it difficult to surmise the creature’s true location. Any melee or ranged attack directed at it has a 50% miss chance unless the attacker can locate the ghirrash by some means other than sight. A true seeing effect allows the user to see the ghirrash’s position, but see invisibility has no effect.

CHAPTER 3:

Skills: Balance +15, Climb +16, Hide +13, Jump +26, Listen +11, Move Silently +13, Spot +11, Survival +11, Tumble +15 Feats: Improved Initiative, Lightning Reflexes, Weapon Focus (claw) Climate/Terrain: Plane of Shadow Organization: Solitary or squad (2–4) Challenge Rating: 7 Treasure: No coins; 50% goods; standard items Alignment: Always chaotic (any) Advancement: 8–10 HD (Large); 11–21 HD (Huge) Level Adjustment: +8

This bipedal creature has the head and long tail of a crocodile attached to its muscular body. Thick scales cover its body, particularly heavy on its back and tail. Its arms end in heavy claws, and its powerful mouth is filled with sharp teeth.

Native to the fetid swamps of the Plane of Shadow, khumats are dim-witted but crafty predators. Left to their own devices, they swim through the murky water of their homes hunting for prey, but as soldiers they follow orders well and march comfortably across land.

Combat Ghirrash

A khumat can attack with a slap of its tail or with its bite, and it makes the decision based primarily on how tasty its opponent looks—it cheerfully bites humanoids and animals, while it prefers to slap aberrations and extraplanar creatures with its tail. Once it has bitten a foe, it enjoys slowly crushing the enemy to death in its powerful jaws.

69

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 4:58 PM Page 70

Feats: Improved Sunder, Iron Will, Lightning Reflexes, Power Attack, Powerful ChargeB, Cleave Climate/Terrain: Plane of Shadow Organization: Solitary, squad (2–4), company (5–20) Challenge Rating: 9 Treasure: No coins; 50% goods; standard items Alignment: Always lawful evil Advancement: 14–20 HD (Large); 21–40 HD (Huge) Level Adjustment: —

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

A hulking brute of a creature, this thing resembles an elephant formed of solid muscle. Its long head is contorted into a look of pure fury. Two long, curving tusks extend from its mouth, and a short trunk twists between them. Its ears are small, while its forelimbs are long and powerful. Its hide looks nearly impenetrable.

Dire Boar illus. by S. Tappin

Dire Boar

70

Improved Grab (Ex): To use this ability, a khumat must hit with its bite attack. It can then attempt to start a grapple as a free action without provoking an attack of opportunity. Skills: A khumat has a +8 racial bonus on any Swim check to perform some special action or avoid a hazard. It can always choose to take 10 on a Swim check, even if distracted or endangered. It can use the run action while swimming, provided it swims in a straight line.

THASKOR Large Outsider (Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 13d8+65 (123 hp) Initiative: +0 Speed: 40 ft. (8 squares) AC: 28 (–1 size, +19 natural), touch 9, flat-footed 28 Base Attack/Grapple: +13/+27 Attack: Slam +22 melee (2d8+15) Full Attack: Slam +22 melee (2d8+15) Space/Reach: 10 ft./10 ft. Special Attacks: Trumpeting blast Special Qualities: Damage reduction 5/–, darkvision 60 ft., immunity to poison, Thaskor resistance to acid 10, cold 10, electricity 10, and fire 10, spell resistance 18 Saves: Fort +13, Ref +10, Will +11 Abilities: Str 31, Dex 10, Con 21, Int 12, Wis 13, Cha 16 Skills: Bluff +19, Concentration +21, Diplomacy +23, Disguise +3 (+5 acting), Intimidate +21, Listen +17, Search +17, Sense Motive +17, Spot +17, Survival +17 (+19 following tracks)

A thaskor is 16 feet long and weighs fully 4,000 pounds. Though it appears quadrupedal, like an elephant it can rear up on its short hind legs to gain better reach with its forelegs. Opponents who misjudge the thaskor as a stupid brute rarely survive to regret their mistake. Despite their fearsome appearance, thaskors can be subtle, deceptive, and fiendishly clever.

Combat Thaskors delight in charging into combat and slamming their opponents with the full weight of their massive bodies. A thaskor considers it a point of personal pride never to use its tusks in battle, and it upholds this pride to the death. Trumpeting Blast (Su): Once every 1d4 rounds as a free action, a thaskor can blow a trumpeting blast with its trunk. The blast fills a 10-foot cone; any creature within that area must make a DC 21 Fortitude save or be stunned for 1 round. This is a sonic attack. The save DC is Constitution-based.

SPARK LASHER

Medium Aberration Hit Dice: 3d8+3 (16 hp) Initiative: +1 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares), swim 10 ft. Armor Class: 14 (+1 Dex, +3 natural), touch 11, flat-footed 13 Base Attack/Grapple: +2/+1 Attack: Tentacle +3 melee touch (3d8 electricity) or bite +3 melee (1d6–1) Full Attack: Tentacle +3 melee touch (3d8 electricity) or bite +3 melee (1d6–1) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Electricity damage Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., immunity to electricity Saves: Fort +2, Ref +4, Will +2 Abilities: Str 8, Dex 13, Con 13, Int 12, Wis 8, Cha 13 Skills: Hide +1*, Intimidate +7, Survival +5, Swim +13 Feats: Lightning Reflexes, Weapon Finesse Environment: Warm marshes Organization: Solitary, gang (2–5 plus 0, 1, or 2 shambling mounds) Challenge Rating: 2 Treasure: 1/10 coins; 50% goods; 50% items

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:24 PM Page 71

MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

submerge to come at the intruders from another direction. In groups, spark lashers try to surround intruders, preferably driving allied shambling mounds before them. Faced with a creature that has immunity to its electricity, a spark lasher can resort to its feeble bite, but it would rather just flee. Electricity Damage (Su): The touch of a spark lasher’s tentacles deals 3d8 points of electricity damage. Skills: A spark lasher has a +8 racial bonus on any Swim check. It can always choose to take 10 on a Swim check, even if distracted or endangered. It can use the run action while swimming, provided it swims in a straight line. *Spark lashers have a +8 bonus on Hide checks when in a marsh.

STONECHILD

Alignment: Usually chaotic evil Advancement: 4–6 HD (Medium); 7–9 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: — What looks at first like a sodden swamp plant proves to be an ugly, lowslung, six-legged creature. Its head is a forward-thrust knob consisting mostly of mouth, while along its back is a mass of tentacles that spark and flicker.

The swamp-dwelling spark lasher is often mistaken for a plant, until its charged tentacles lash forth. Gray-green skin, folded and barklike, wraps a spark lasher in protective coloration. The creature trundles around low to the soggy ground on six legs. Spark lashers swim through water with only their tentacles exposed to the air, giving the impression of a mat of floating vegetation. When a spark lasher encounters a creature it knows to be too strong for it, the lasher may attempt to intimidate its potential foe before making an escape. Possessed of a twisted but considerable intelligence, spark lashers speak Aquan and Infernal. Just who might want to speak to a spark lasher remains unclear.

With rough, gray skin and a stony bulk, this creature looks like a powerful human made of stone. A huge greatsword slung over its shoulder rounds out the appearance of raw, rugged strength.

Combat As loners, spark lashers prefer to leap out at unsuspecting intruders. If spotted, a spark lasher may simply

Spark Lasher illus. by A. Smith

Spark lasher

Medium Outsider (Earth, Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 2d8+11 (20 hp) Initiative: +0 Speed: 20 ft. in breastplate (4 squares); base land speed 30 ft. Armor Class: 19 (+4 natural, +5 breastplate), touch 10, flatfooted 19 Base Attack/Grapple: +2/+6 Attack: Greatsword +6 melee (2d6+6/19–20) Full Attack: Greatsword +6 melee (2d6+6/19–20) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: Magic stone Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., immunity to acid and poison Saves: Fort +7, Ref +3, Will +3 Abilities: Str 19, Dex 10, Con 19, Int 12, Wis 11, Cha 8 Skills: Appraise +6 (+8 stonework), Climb +5, Craft (stoneworking) +6, Intimidate +4, Knowledge (history) +6, Knowledge (the planes) +6, Listen +5, Search +6, Spot +5, Survival +0 (+2 following tracks, +4 following tracks on other planes, +2 on other planes) Feats: Blind-FightB, Toughness Environment: Underground Organization: Solitary, crew (2–8 plus 0–3 leaders with 6 HD) Challenge Rating: 3 Treasure: 50% coins; triple goods, 50% items Alignment: Usually neutral good Advancement: 3–6 HD (Medium) Level Adjustment: +4

Stonechild

Born of a union of mortal and elemental, a stonechild is a hardy entity grounded in soil and stone. A stonechild appears humanoid in form only. A stonechild’s elemental heritage is revealed in its rough, rocklike skin—the creature looks more elemental than humanoid. However, unlike pure elementals, a stonechild wears utilitarian harnesses and some clothing, and wields a heavy weapon—usually a greatsword.

71

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:24 PM Page 72

A stonechild lives on the Elemental Plane of Earth, pursuing activities and a way of life at odds with those of its mortal ancestor. A stonechild usually arrives on a different plane only at the behest of spells or to fill out armies for those with whom they share similar ideals, such as dwarves.

Combat MONSTERS

CHAPTER 3:

Stonechildren are stalwart in combat, taking on great challenges with relish. Magic Stone (Sp): Three times per day, a stonechild can use a magic stone effect, as the spell (caster level 3rd).

Illus. Illus. by D.by Hanley

WALKING WALL

Medium Elemental (Earth, Extraplanar) Hit Dice: 6d8+36 (63 hp) Initiative: +0 Speed: 30 ft. (6 squares) AC: 17 (+7 natural), touch 10, flat-footed 17 Base Attack/Grapple: +4/+8 Attack: Slam +9 melee (2d10+6) Full Attack: Slam +9 melee (2d10+6) Space/Reach: 5 ft./5 ft. Special Attacks: — Special Qualities: Darkvision 60 ft., elemental traits, stony defense Saves: Fort +11, Ref +2, Will +5 Abilities: Str 19, Dex 10, Con 22, Int 13, Wis 13, Cha 10 Skills: Listen +10, Spot +10, Survival +10 Feats: Iron Will, Power Attack, Weapon Focus (slam) Climate/Terrain: Temperate hills Organization: Solitary Challenge Rating: 4 Treasure: None Alignment: Usually lawful neutral Advancement: 7–9 HD (Medium); 10–18 HD (Large) Level Adjustment: — This creature looks like an outcropping of stone, fully 8 feet high, walking about on two massive legs. Its head, shoulders, and forearms all consist of great blocks of solid earth, with only the vaguest hint of facial features distinguishing it from natural stone.

The walking wall has earned its name on the battlefield: It can bring its arms and head together to provide mobile cover to its allies. It stands 8 feet tall and weighs 500 pounds. Walking walls speak Common and Terran in low, gravelly voices.

72

Stonechild

Combat Walking walls are well suited to offense or defense. They generally do their utmost to shield their allies from harm, but their last line of defense is a powerful blow from their massive fists. Elemental Traits: A walking wall has immunity to poison, sleep effects, paralysis, and stunning. It is not subject to critical hits or flanking. It cannot be raised, reincarnated, or resurrected (though a limited wish, wish, miracle, or true resurrection spell can restore life). Stony Defense (Su): As a fullround action, a walking wall can stand as a solid barrier, providing cover and toughening its own defenses. Its natural armor bonus increases from +7 to +17, raising its AC to 27 until its next turn. It can remain in this defensive position as long as it desires, but if it takes any other action, its Armor Class returns to its normal value and it no longer provides cover.

Walking wall

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:25 PM Page 73

Illus. by D. Hanley

ach DUNGEONS & DRAGONS miniature represents a character or creature from the worlds of the D&D game. (The skirmish and mass battles rules refer to all miniatures as “creatures,” and for simplicity this term is also used when referring to the roleplaying side of the card.) Each creature has a corresponding stat card that lists game statistics for the miniatures rules on one side and the roleplaying rules on the other.

ROLEPLAYING STATISTICS

One side of the stat card, labeled “D&D Quick Reference,” summarizes information for standard D&D roleplaying sessions. These simplified roleplaying statistics are easier to use during play. Details that aren’t necessary for running the creature as a one-time opponent may be abbreviated or even left out. For example, a wizard’s prepared spells are listed, but not spells known: It matters what spells a wizard knows when using the character as a repeat nonplayer character (NPC), but not for a single encounter. An example of a D&D Quick Reference card is shown on the following page. Each of the types of information on the card is defined and described below.

IDENTITY At the top of the stat card is the creature’s basic identity. This consists of its name or title, alignment, size and type, and class (if any).

Name The name of the creature can be the kind of monster it is (such as “Medusa”), an NPC’s race and class (such as “Half-Orc Fighter”),

an evocative title (such as “Sword of Heironeous” for a 6th-level human paladin), or an individual’s name (such as “Ember, Human Monk”). The name is always capitalized, since it is the name of the “piece” in the miniatures rules. Where necessary, additional identification is provided in parentheses. For example, the Large Red Dragon in the Dragoneye™ set is a young dragon, so the age category appears in parentheses after its name.

Alignment This entry is the abbreviation for the creature’s alignment. Alignment often corresponds to the character or creature’s faction in the miniatures rules, but not always. For example, the Gnome Recruit in the Harbinger™ set is neutral good but fights with the Chaotic Good faction in the miniatures rules.

Size This entry corresponds to the character or creature’s size in the roleplaying rules. To save space, it is a one-letter abbreviation.

Type This entry gives the character’s or creature’s type (including subtypes), as explained in the Monster Manual.

Class and Level This entry uses the standard abbreviations for the base classes in the Player’s Handbook. In addition,

73

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:26 PM Page 74

new base classes from this book, and prestige classes from other D&D books, are likewise abbreviated. Below is a list of class abbreviations; future sets will list any new class abbreviations on an update sheet in the Expansion Pack.

Illus. by D. Hanley

STAT CARDS

CHAPTER 4:

Class Miniatures Handbook Bonded summoner Dragon samurai Favored soul Havoc mage Healer Marshal Skullclan hunter Tactical soldier War hulk Warchief Warmage Other Sources Bladesinger Drunken master Eye of Gruumsh Halfling outrider Ravager Tattooed monk Thayan knight

Abbreviation Sum Dsm Fvs Hmg Hlr Msh Htr Tcs Hlk Chf Wmg

Eye of Gruumsh

Bld Drk Eye Out Rav Ttm Thk

ATK (Attack)

Creatures without character classes have no entry here. A creature’s overall level, or character level, is indicated by the Hit Dice entry in its statistics (see below). For example, the ThriKreen Ranger is a “Rgr2,” meaning that it has two levels in the ranger class A thri-kreen also has two “levels” (HD) of monstrous humanoid, but monstrous humanoid is not a character class. The creature has a total of 4 HD, giving it a character level of 4th.

STATISTICS Below the identity entries are the character’s or creature’s statistics. These statistics include Hit Dice, Armor Class, initiative modifier, speed, attacks, special attacks and special qualities, saves, and ability scores.

HD (Hit Dice) This entry gives the creature’s number of Hit Dice (and its hit points in parentheses). The die type and any hit point bonuses aren’t given because you don’t need that information during play. This entry gives the creature’s Armor Class, with touch AC (T) and flat-footed AC (FF) in parentheses.

INIT (Initiative) This entry gives the creature’s initiative modifier.

74

This entry gives the character or creature’s speed in feet. If the creature has a special movement mode, it’s noted in abbreviated form (B: burrow, C: climb, F: fly, S: swim). If the creature is wearing medium or heavy armor, its base speed (without armor) may be faster than its indicated speed. A creature that is mounted may have a base speed lower than its indicated speed (although the card notes that the creature is mounted).

Name

Size Alignment

Type

Class and Level

Vadania, Half-Elf Druid: N Medium Humanoid

AC (Armor Class)

SPD (Speed)

This entry gives the creature’s melee attacks and (if applicable) ranged attacks. The entry lists all attacks available. Generally, a creature making a single attack simply uses the best attack bonus available. Sometimes, however, a single attack gets a better attack bonus than any one of multiple attacks. For example, the Halfling Veteran fights with two short swords, with a +8 attack bonus for each one. Since two-weapon fighting in this way incurs a –2 penalty on attack rolls, the Halfling Veteran’s attack bonus with a single short sword is +10. On cards released after the Harbinger set, this entry indicates both single attack and full attack bonuses when the best attack bonus is different. When possible, separate attack forms appear on their own lines. To save space, this entry does not include details such as magic weapon special abilities or the Strength bonus for a composite longbow, just the basic weapon name (bow, sword, and so on)

Statistics

Possessions CR

(ELF)

Drd3

HD: 3 (20 hp) INIT: +2 AC: 18 (T 12, FF 16) SPD: 20 ft. ATK: Scimitar +4 melee (1d6) SQ: Animal companion, half-elf traits, nature sense, spells, trackless step, wild empathy, woodland stride SAVES: Fort +5, Ref +4, Will +6 ABILITIES: Str 10, Dex 14, Con 13, Int 12, Wis 15, Cha 8 SKILLS: Concentration +7, Handle Animal +5, Heal +8, Spellcraft +7, Survival +8 FEATS: Scribe Scroll, Weapon Focus (scimitar) SPELLS: (4/3/2; save DC 12 + spell level): 0—detect magic (2), detect poison, light; 1st—magic fang (2), produce flame; 2nd—cat's grace, flame blade POSS: +1 hide, heavy wooden shield, masterwork scimitar, cloak of resistance +1, scroll of barkskin CR: 3 D&D QUICK REFERENCE

Illus. Des Hanley

Illustration

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:26 PM Page 75

plus attack and damage figures. The possessions entry (see below) provides complete details about the weapon.

SA/SQ (Special Attacks and Special Qualities)

This entry gives the creature’s saving throw bonuses.

AB (Abilities) The creature’s ability scores are listed in the standard order. To save space, the usual ability abbreviations are shortened even more to S, D, Cn, I, W, and Ch.

S/F (Skills and Feats)

Challenge Rating helps a DM judge the creature as an opponent. It’s also possible to combine multiple creatures into a single encounter. To find the Encounter Level (EL) for an encounter involving two creatures, consult Table 4–1: Challenge Ratings and Encounter Levels, below. Find the column that corresponds to one opponent’s CR and the row that corresponds to the other opponent’s CR. The number where the column and the row cross is the EL of an encounter involving both creatures. You can use this table over again to determine the EL of an encounter with three or more creatures, using the EL for a group of creatures as if it were the CR of one creature. For example, if the encounter is with an Orc Archer (CR 1) and a Half-Orc Fighter (CR 2), the Encounter Level is 3. If the group consists of an Orc Archer (CR 1), a Half-Orc Fighter

Large Red Dragon

Illus. by D. Hanley

The creature’s skills and feats are listed here. Skills appear first, then feats. This entry is absent if the creature has no skill ranks or feats. Skills: Generally, the list of skill modifiers does not take into account conditional bonuses from synergy (such as the bonus on Disguise checks when acting that comes from having 5 or more ranks in Bluff ) or skills that would appear only because of a bonus from synergy (such as the bonus on Balance checks granted by 5 or more ranks in Tumble). A few special bonuses are mentioned, such as a canine creature’s bonus on tracking by scent. Many skill names are abbreviated. Skills that have no relevance to an encounter (such as Craft) do not appear in this entry. Feats: Most feats are important to running an encounter, but to save space, some may be left out. This entry does not list feats whose effect is included in other statistics; for example, a cleric with the War domain automatically gains Weapon Proficiency and Weapon Focus with the deity’s favored weapon. The proficiency can be omitted on the stat card since it is assumed in the cleric’s attack bonus. As with skills, feats that have no relevance to an encounter (such as item creation feats) do not appear in this entry.

CHAPTER 4:

SV (Saves)

CR (CHALLENGE RATING)

STAT CARDS

This entry gives the creature’s special attacks and special qualities. They appear in alphabetical order on one line for ease of reference. The entry provides certain information, such as save DC or damage dealt by a special attack, but many details (such as whether the ability is extraordinary, supernatural, or spell-like) are omitted. Refer to the Monster Manual, Player’s Handbook, or other rulebooks as appropriate for complete details. This entry may also include information, such as a creature’s reach, that is not normally given under special attacks but is useful for quick reference during combat.

Dungeon Master can use to equip the NPC with additional items. This gold piece amount is the standard value for an NPC’s gear by level (see the Dungeon Master’s Guide) minus the value of the gear that the NPC already has. The DM can use this gold to “upgrade” items, turning normal weapons into masterwork weapons, normal armor into magic armor, and so on. This entry is absent if the creature has no possessions. This may also be the case if its only possession is its weapon (such as the Bearded Devil’s glaive).

Spells If the creature is a spellcaster, spells are listed here. Some spells include reminder notes to help the DM, such as damage dealt or save DC. Many spell names appear in abbreviated form. The entry for a caster who does not prepare spells (such as a sorcerer) gives the number of spells available per day at each level. For casters who prepare spells, only the prepared spells appear. This entry is absent if the creature is not a spellcaster.

POSS (POSSESSIONS) This entry gives the creature’s equipment and other gear. Often, NPCs have less gear than standard for NPCs of their level. In this case, a remaining gold piece amount is given, which the

75

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:27 PM Page 76

(CR 2), and a Cleric of Gruumsh (CR 4), then the EL is 5+ (CR 1 + CR 2 = EL 3; EL 3 + CR 4 = EL 5+). As the second example shows, when dealing with a group of creatures, you should work with the lowest-CR creatures first, then add others one at a time, working up to the creature with the highest CR.

STAT CARDS

CHAPTER 4:

Table 4–1: Challenge Ratings and Encounter Levels 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1 3 3 4 4+ 5+ 6+ 7+ — — — 2 3+ 4 4+ 5 5+ 6+ 7+ 8+ — — 3 4 4+ 5 5+ 6 6+ 7+ 8+ 9+ — 4 4+ 5 5+ 6 6+ 7 7+ 8+ 9+ 10+ 5 5+ 5+ 6 6+ 7 7+ 8 8+ 9+ 10+ 6 6+ 6+ 6+ 7 7+ 8 8+ 9 9+ 10+ 7 7+ 7+ 7+ 7+ 8 8+ 9 9+ 10 10+ 8 — 8+ 8+ 8+ 8+ 9 9+ 10 10+ 11 9 — — 9+ 9+ 9+ 9+ 10 10+ 11 11+ 10 — — — 10+ 10+ 10+ 10+ 11 11+ 12 +: Indicates a tougher than normal encounter of that EL. —: The weaker creature doesn’t contribute significantly to the difficulty of the encounter.

For encounters involving higher-CR creatures, you can use the calculations given in Table 4–2, below. (The numbers in Table 4–1 were derived from these calculations.)

Table 4–2: Combined EL Calculations Weaker Creature’s CR Is: 7 or more lower than stronger creature’s 3–6 lower than stronger creature’s 2 lower than stronger creature’s 1 lower than stronger creature’s Same as stronger creature’s

Combined Encounter Level Equals: Stronger creature’s CR (no change) Stronger creature’s CR+ (slight increase) Stronger creature’s CR +1 (add 1) Stronger creature’s CR +1+ (add 1, then slight increase) Stronger creature’s CR +2 (add 2)

SOURCE This entry identifies the source for a creature, a prestige class, or some other feature of the card that is not found in the core D&D rulebooks. For example, the drunken master prestige class comes from the Complete Warrior accessory. This entry is absent on most cards.

ILLUSTRATION The illustration on the card helps you identify the miniature that coresponds to the card, as well as naming the artist. Typically, this

illustration is the concept art that was created to guide the design of the original sculpture.

MINIATURES STATISTICS

The miniatures rules statistics support two styles of play: skirmishes and mass battles. The miniatures rules always refer to a creature or character as a “creature.” Look at the miniatures rules side of the example stat card displayed here.

IDENTITY At the top of the stat card is the creature’s basic identity. This consists of a name, faction symbol, cost, and Commander rating (if applicable).

Name The name identifies the creature detailed on the card and matches the name on the base of the miniature. Usually the name is a kind of creature, such as “Gnoll” or “Elf Pyromancer.” Sometimes, however, it includes a character’s name, such as ”Tordek, Dwarf Fighter.”

Faction Symbol There are four factions fighting it out for supremacy, corresponding to four alignments in the roleplaying rules. Each creature’s stat card has a symbol that identifies which faction or factions it can fight for: Lawful Good, Chaotic Good, Lawful Evil, or Chaotic Evil. Each faction has strengths that determine its optimal tactics. This isn’t to say that all creatures within a faction stick to the “party line,” but those that deviate from their faction’s normal strengths tend to cost more. Lawful Good: This faction is devoted to truth, law, and justice. It mercilessly opposes evil while protecting the innocent and helping those in need. Crusaders in word and deed, members of this faction live by the ideals of honor and compassion. Creatures of the Lawful Good faction tend to have highquality armor and access to healing. They’re accustomed to fighting in teams and obeying orders, so there are few Difficult creatures in this faction. Lawful Good commanders are comfortable giving orders and trusted by their followers, so this faction has the highest Commander ratings. Consequently its creatures have

pqqqqrs MINIATURES AND ROLEPLAYING STATISTICS Sometimes the miniatures side of the stat card differs from the roleplaying side. This variance is intentional. The miniatures side provides you with a creature that works well in skirmishes and mass battles. The roleplaying side summarizes an opponent or NPC that works well in a roleplaying session. When a single version of the creature isn’t appropriate for both purposes, we provide different sets of statistics rather than compromise one side or the other. A very advanced character on the roleplaying side might be too powerful for skirmishes or mass battles. For example, the legendary

76

mage Elminster from the FORGOTTEN REALMS® Campaign Setting is an epic character of 35th level. Such a mighty being would be unplayable in a competitive game, so one side would have the full-strength roleplaying statistics while the other would tone them down for the miniatures rules. As another example, a spellcaster’s spells in the roleplaying statistics might not all translate to the miniatures statistics if they would make the miniature too powerful in a battle. A character’s miniatures statistics also might not take into account all the magic items listed in its roleplaying statistics.

pqqqqrs

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:27 PM Page 77

STAT CARDS

playing rules. The Half-Orc Monk is lawful neutral in the roleplaying rules and so has two faction symbols in the miniatures rules: Lawful Good and Lawful Evil. Thus, the Half-Orc Monk can fight on behalf of either faction. A few creatures are capable of fighting for any faction, and so can be added to any warband. These creatures’ stat cards have symbols for all four factions. They correspond to neutral creatures in the roleplaying rules, with no bias toward any particular alignment. Faction and Special Abilities: Some special abilities depend on a creature’s faction. The Sword of Heironeous, for example, has Smite Evil +5: It can deal extra damage to an evil creature once per battle. Creatures in Lawful Evil or Chaotic Evil warbands count as evil. If a creature has more than one faction, it counts as belonging to the faction of its warband or army. For instance, a Thri-Kreen Ranger in a Chaotic Evil warband would be vulnerable to Smite Evil, but not a Thri-Kreen Ranger in a Chaotic Good warband.

CHAPTER 4:

the best morale: Even when they do rout, they’re likely to return to the fight so long as their commander fights alongside them. Chaotic Good: This faction combines a kind heart with a free spirit. Its members believe in what is good and right, but these rebels have little regard for rules and regulations. The faction acts according to the conscience of its members, following a code of benevolence while working to protect freedom. Creatures of the Chaotic Good faction have the best ranged attacks and the best ranged spells. In general, they’re fast-moving and lightly armored. Chaotic Good commanders frequently have Commander Effects that increase the effectiveness of ranged attacks. Lawful Evil: This faction cares about tradition and loyalty but has no regard for freedom, dignity, or life. Each member dreams of ruling, but all are willing to serve to further their goals. Diabolical and dominating, the members of this faction are methodical and committed to spreading their tyranny across the land. Creatures of the Lawful Evil faction share Lawful Good’s tendency toward high Armor Class and good command ability. These creatures can’t be fully trusted by their followers, though, so their Commander ratings are not as high as those of Lawful Good commanders. Lawful Evil creatures tend to have combat-related feats and aggressive tactics that grant them high melee attack bonuses. Many of this faction’s Commander Effects increase the odds that a melee attack will find its target. Chaotic Evil: This faction is driven by greed, hatred, and a lust for destruction. Its members are hot-tempered, vicious, and unpredictable. Destroyers committed to spreading chaos, members of this faction use power and ruthlessness to make up for a lack of planning and organization. This faction shares the good speed typical of Chaotic Good creatures, but its emphasis is less on ranged attacks than on tremendous melee damage. Chaotic Evil creatures’ attack bonuses aren’t likely to be as high as those of the Lawful Evil or even Chaotic Good factions, but they deal more damage when they do hit. Many of this faction’s Commander Effects increase the damage dealt by a successful melee attack. Faction, Warbands, and Armies: A warband or army is made up of creatures that share a single faction. A Lawful Good warband, for example, is made up of Lawful Good creatures. Some creatures can fight for two different factions and so can be added to warbands or armies of either. These creatures’ stat cards have symbols for both factions. This characteristic corresponds to having one neutral alignment component in the role-

Cost The cost of a creature is the number of points you pay to add that creature to your warband or army. In a mass battles army, you pay an additional 20 points above the printed cost for a commander. A typical skirmish warband contains 100 points of creatures. A typical mass battles army contains 1,000 points of creatures. In most scenarios, you score victory points for defeating your opponents’ creatures. A creature’s point value is equal to its cost.

Commander Rating Some creatures are commanders and can influence other creatures in battle. Commanders (and only commanders) have a Commander rating. Skirmish Rules: In a skirmish battle, the highest-ranking commander in your warband adds its Commander rating to your initiative rolls. Also, a commander can add its Commander rating to a follower’s morale save. Mass Battles Rules: In a mass battle, a commander gets command points each round equal to its Commander rating. Commanders can spend these points to help their followers and improve those creatures’ performance in battle.

STATISTICS The heart of the stat card, this section provides ratings that determine a creature’s basic fighting capabilities.

LVL (Level) Level describes the overall power of a creature. It’s the equivalent of the creature’s character level or Hit Dice in the roleplaying rules. Saves: You add a creature’s level to its 1d20 roll when it makes a save to avoid the effect of a spell or to brave the dangers of combat.

SPD (Speed) In the skirmish rules, a creature’s speed is the number of squares it can move on the battle grid. In the mass battles rules, it is the number of inches the creature can move across the battlefield. A creature that does not attack, cast a spell, or take a standard action can move up to double speed. In the skirmish rules, a creature that is out of command has its speed reduced to 2.

AC (Armor Class) This entry is the creature’s Armor Class. An attack roll whose result equals or exceeds this number is a hit.

77

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:27 PM Page 78

STAT CARDS

CHAPTER 4:

HP (Hit Points) This entry is the creature’s hit points. When a creature’s hit point total is first reduced to half its full normal total or lower, it must succeed on a morale save or run away (rout). If its hit points are reduced to 0 or lower, it is destroyed and removed from play. A hit point number is always a multiple of 5. Typically, this number is the creature’s hit points in the roleplaying rules, rounded up or down to the nearest multiple of 5 (but always at least 5). For example, a typical ogre as described in Statistics the Monster Manual has 29 hit points, so in the miniatures rules, its hit point rating is 30. Commander Effect

Melee Attack

Faction Symbol

Commander Rating

Vadania, Half-Elf Druid CG

COMMANDER 2

LVL: 3 AC: 18

Cost

22

POINTS

SPD: 4 HP: 20

MELEE ATTACK: +4 (5) RANGED ATTACK: — TYPE: Humanoid (Elf) COMMANDER EFFECT: Animal and Magical Beast followers gain Save +2.

Collector Number Set Icon Faction

SPECIAL ABILITIES: Unique. Beastmaster 2. This entry is used when attacking enemy Special Abilities creatures in adjacent squares (including SPELLS: 1st—magic fang ❑❑ (touch, Animal or Spells diagonally). The melee attack bonus is Cost Magical Beast only; attack +1, ignore DR), produce flame ❑ (sight; 5 fire damage); 2nd—cat’s grace ❑ the number outside the parentheses: Add Name (touch; +2 AC, ranged attack +2), flame blade ❑ (self; this bonus to the creature’s attack roll. If the result melee attack +5, melee damage becomes 5 fire). equals or exceeds the enemy’s Armor Class, the attack is a hit. The number inside the parentheses shows how much damage the creature deals with a melee attack that hits. Copyright Notice A damage number is always a multiple of 5. (You ©2003 Wizards 29/80 ★ can track damage using counters, with each representing 5 points of damage.) Typically, this number is the creature’s average damage in the roleplaying rules, rounded up or down to the nearest multiple of Copyright Notice Set Icon/Collector Number 5 (but always at least 5). If a creature’s melee attack deals special damage of some kind, this is noted in the damage entry. For example, Type the Half-Orc Monk’s mystic fists allow it to strike as a magic This entry is the creature’s type, such as “Humanoid” or “Undead.” weapon. Its melee damage rating is “10 magic,” so it deals 10 Some creatures also have subtypes given in parentheses. For points of magic damage when it hits. example, humans have the type “Humanoid (Human).” Sometimes a creature’s attack deals more than one kind of Type and Special Abilities: Some creature types bestow damage. In this case, the two kinds of damage are given sepanumerous special traits. These creature types are Construct, rately. For example, the Salamander’s red-hot spear burns a foe Dragon, Elemental, Ooze, Plant, Undead, and Vermin. The traits that it strikes. Its melee damage rating is “10 + 5 fire,” so it deals associated with each of these types are found in the glossary at 10 points of melee damage plus an additional 5 points of fire the end of Chapter 5 of this book. damage when it hits. Additionally, some special abilities depend on a creature’s Multiple Melee Attacks: Some creatures can make more than type or subtype. For instance, the Barghest gains hit points one melee attack. Their attack numbers are separated by a slash (/). when it destroys a Humanoid but not when it destroys any In most cases, each attack deals the same amount of damage. If difother type of creature. ferent attacks deal different amounts of damage, the damage ratSize: The type entry also indicates a creature’s size. (Most creaings are given in the same order as the attack ratings and are also tures are Medium, and their stat cards do not give a size.) A Small separated by a slash. For example, the Barghest has a melee attack creature has a 20 mm base, and a Medium creature has a 25 mm rating of +9/+4 (10/5). It can make two melee attacks, one with a base; each occupies 1 square on the battle grid. A Large creature +9 bonus on the attack roll that deals 10 points of damage, and one has a 40 mm base and takes up 4 squares. with a +4 bonus on the attack roll that deals 5 points of damage. Some special abilities are dependent on size. For example, folA creature that moves during its turn can make only one attack lowers of the Cleric of Yondalla get a +2 bonus on attacks against even if it is otherwise capable of making multiple attacks. creatures that are larger than they are.

Ranged Attack

78

Name

This entry is used when attacking an enemy within line of sight. Most creatures don’t have a ranged attack score. Creatures with ranged attacks have attack bonus and damage entries that work just like those for melee attacks. In the miniatures rules, a creature making a ranged attack must target the nearest enemy creature. (In the chaos and confusion of battle, an archer doesn’t have the luxury of choosing targets carefully.) However, some special abilities and Commander Effects allow ranged attackers to choose more distant targets.

COMMANDER EFFECT The presence of a commander helps troops fight harder and smarter. Some commanders even dismay their enemies. Only commanders have Commander Effects; this entry does not appear on the stat card of a creature that is not a commander. Skirmish Rules: A Commander Effect grants one or more bonuses or special abilities to followers within 6 squares of the commander. Sometimes a Commander Effect instead affects enemy creatures within 6 squares of the commander. Mass Battles Rules: A Commander Effect applies only to

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:28 PM Page 79

the unit to which the commander is attached. If it affects enemies, it applies to all enemy units with which the commander’s unit is engaged, and only if the commander is leading from the front of the unit. However, an unattached commander can use its Commander Effect against all units it engages.

SPECIAL ABILITIES

DERIVING MINIATURES RATINGS

To derive ratings for abilities in the miniatures rules, start with the creature’s statistics in the roleplaying rules. You might want to address special abilities, spells, skills, and feats first, because those characteristics can affect other statistics. Special abilities and creature costs each warrant their own sections; see below.

IDENTITY This information consists of a name, faction symbol, cost, and Commander rating (if applicable).

Some creatures can cast spells. If so, these spells are listed by level on the stat card. Spell effects are defined by a number of special keywords. These are defined in the glossaries in Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 of this book. Most spells can be used only a limited number of times. These have check boxes (❑), one for each use. This entry does not appear on the stat card of a creature that cannot cast spells.

Name Give the creature whatever name makes sense. Factions in the miniatures rules don’t always match alignment in the roleplaying rules. Use the following guidelines to choose a faction or factions for a creature. If the creature’s alignment is lawful good, chaotic good, lawful evil, or chaotic evil, its faction matches its alignment. If the creature’s alignment contains one neutral component (neutral good, lawful neutral, chaotic neutral, or neutral evil), it can belong to both factions that its alignment is “next to,” such as Lawful Good/Chaotic Good for a neutral good creature. Creatures with a neutral can belong to any warband so have a faction of “Any”. Very often creatures that have a neutral outlook work with only good or evil creatures. In these cases, match a creature’s faction to its preference, rather than its actual alignment. For example, Lidda, Halfling Rogue is chaotic neutral in the roleplaying rules, but since she never works with evil creatures, her faction in the miniatures rules is Chaotic Good.

At the bottom of the card is collector information: the set icon, collector number, and rarity. The icon tells you what set a miniature belongs to, such as the Harbinger set (whose icon is a trumpet). The collector number gives the miniature’s order in the set, as well as the total number of miniatures the set contains. The rarity symbol tells you whether a miniature is common (circle), uncommon (diamond), or rare (star).

CONVERTING TO THE MINIATURES RULES

Illus. by D. Hanley

Faction

COLLECTOR INFORMATION

You can convert creatures, spells, and other elements from the D&D roleplaying game for use in skirmishes or mass battles. This section gives you some guidelines on how to do this. Converting a creature is not a simple matter of applying a formula. You’ll do better to capture its flavor, spirit, and concept rather than to account for every detail and wind up with something that’s overly complicated. Keep in mind that the miniatures system uses a simpler set of rules than the roleplaying system. Instead of controlling a single creature, you often control

CHAPTER 4:

SPELLS

STAT CARDS

This entry provides the creature’s special attacks, resistances, and weaknesses (if any). Special abilities may contradict the general rules. When a creature has a special ability that contradicts a rule, that ability takes precedence. Some special abilities can be used only a limited number of times. These have check boxes (❑), one for each use. Many special abilities’ effects are written out entirely on the stat card. In such cases, the text describes the ability’s effect in a skirmish. For the effects of special abilities in mass battles, see Mass Battle Special Abilities in Chapter 6 of this book. Other special abilities use special keywords to describe their effect, and these are defined in the glossaries in Chapter 5 and Chapter 6 of this book. This entry does not appear on the stat card of a creature that has no special abilities. Baaz Draconian

five or more. This requires skipping over a lot of small details to make game play easier. The miniatures rules recast creatures, special abilities, and spells in a format that is true to their original nature but easier and faster to use. If you want your battles to run smoothly and quickly even after you’ve added new creatures, you should take the same approach. Another option is to preserve the various special abilities and other rules of the roleplaying system, but doing this will make the creature much more detailed than is normal in the miniatures rules, and you’ll need to use roleplaying rules to interpret many of its features. You should decide ahead of time how you want to balance features of the roleplaying and miniatures rules.

Cost Figure out what the creature costs last, if you do so at all (see Deriving Costs, at the end of this chapter).

STATISTICS These entries describe the creature’s basic fighting capabilities.

79

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/18/03 5:28 PM Page 80

Level

Melee Damage

This is the same as character level or Hit Dice in the roleplaying rules. If a creature has both Hit Dice and class levels, add them together to determine its level rating in the miniatures rules.

Illus. by D. Hanley

STAT CARDS

CHAPTER 4:

Speed This entry is the creature’s speed in the Gold Champion roleplaying rules, divided by 5 and expressed in squares (because the scale of the grid is 1 square = 5 feet). For creatures with the Flight special ability, it’s necessary to reduce the creature’s fly speed as given in the roleplaying rules, to keep movement reasonable on the battlefield. Rather than applying minimum speeds and turning arcs for different maneuverability ratings, simply reduce the effective speed for clumsier fliers. As a general rule, to determine a creature’s fly speed in the miniatures rules, multiply its D&D fly speed by the factor given below for the creature’s maneuverability, then convert to squares (at the rate of 1 square = 5 feet). Perfect: fly speed × .70 Good: fly speed × .66 Average: fly speed × .40 Poor: fly speed × .30 Clumsy: fly speed × .20 For example, a very young red dragon has a fly speed of 150 feet and poor maneuverability in the roleplaying rules. This converts to a miniatures rules speed of F9. (Creatures with the Flight special ability have an “F” prefix before their speed.) For a creature with a burrow speed, convert at the normal rate of 1 square per 5 feet.

AC This entry is generally the same as the creature’s Armor Class in the roleplaying rules. If the creature has the Dodge feat, add +1 to its AC in the miniatures rules.

This entry is the creature’s average melee damage in the roleplaying rules, rounded to the nearest multiple of 5 (minimum 5).

Ranged Attack and Damage Deriving the attack bonus and damage for ranged attacks works the same as for melee attacks. For thrown weapons, give the attack a range of 6. For projectile weapons, give the creature unlimited range (within line of sight) in the skirmish rules and range 24 in the mass battles rules. A creature with a ranged attack rating should have either a one-shot limit or no limit on the number of ranged attacks it may make during its entire skirmish. (Keeping track of ammunition is a hassle, but remembering whether a creature has used its single ranged attack is easy.)

Multiple Attacks Typically, multiple attacks translate directly to the miniatures rules, with separate attack bonuses (and sometimes damage values) for separate attacks. For example, the Human Blackguard is based on a character having two melee attacks, with bonuses of +14 and +9. These produce a melee attack rating of +14/+9. In the roleplaying rules, however, some characters have different attack bonuses depending on whether they’re making one attack or multiple attacks. For example, the Halfling Veteran is based on a character who fights with two short swords. In the roleplaying rules, this character’s melee attack bonus is +10 when making a single attack and +8 with each attack when using both weapons. In the miniatures rules, this “floating” attack bonus would slow the battle down, so instead the two bonuses are averaged. This translates to a melee attack rating of +9/+9 for the Halfling Veteran.

Type HP This entry is the creature’s hit points in the roleplaying rules, rounded to the nearest multiple of 5 (at least 5 hp). For example, at 1st level Tordek has 13 hit points in the roleplaying rules. That converts to 15 hit points for Tordek, Dwarf Fighter in the miniatures rules.

Melee Attack This entry is usually the same as the creature’s melee attack bonus in the roleplaying rules. Some factors may adjust this number; see Multiple Attacks, below.

pqs AVERAGE DAMAGE To calculate a creature’s average damage, add the minimum and maximum damage together and then divide by 2. For example, an ogre’s average damage with a club is 16. (Its club deals 2d8+7 points of damage; 9 (min) + 23 (max) = 32; 32/2 = 16.)

pqs

80

This entry is the same as the creature’s type in the roleplaying rules. Some creatures (generally humanoids) also have a subtype, given in parentheses. Note a creature’s size only if it is not Medium.

SPECIAL ABILITIES, SPELLS, AND COMMANDERS Translating special abilities, feats, skills, and spells to the miniatures rules is a matter of finesse. Some roleplaying features (such as skills) do not have a direct miniatures equivalent, and some miniatures features (such as Commander rating) do not exist in the roleplaying rules. Others must be simplified for quick headto-head play. These guidelines cover the basics, but many specific abilities may not be covered here. Use your best judgment, starting from what’s presented here.

Troop Type The troop type characteristic doesn’t have a ready parallel in the roleplaying rules. It is a special ability that describes a creature’s ability to follow orders or remain under control in combat.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:03 AM Page 81

Creatures with levels in one or more classes or prestige classes can be commanders. Very intelligent and powerful monsters might be commanders even without classes, such as the Mind Flayer. There’s no hard and fast rule for working out a creature’s Commander rating, but you can make a rough determination using the following lists. Start with a base rating of 1, then add 1 for each property under Higher Commander Rating that the creature possesses and subtract 1 for each property under Lower Commander Rating that the creature possesses. This system can’t advise you on whether to make a creature into a commander. That depends on your vision for the creature and its role in the battle. If a creature is a commander, give it a Commander Effect. You can choose a Commander Effect possessed by one of the other commanders in its faction or invent one along similar lines.

Duration Keeping track of the duration of special abilities slows down a battle. If possible, make a special ability last either for the rest of the battle or for a single round. For example, a barbarian’s rage in the roleplaying rules generally lasts 6 rounds or so (depending on the character’s Constitution modifier). Six rounds is close enough to the length of a whole battle (or at least to a creature’s life span once a battle begins) that, in the miniatures rules, a barbarian such as the Orc Berserker is always considered to be raging, and its statistics are adjusted accordingly. If you want a duration of more than 1 round but less than a whole battle, then you’ll need to keep track of the duration in some way.

Saves In the miniatures rules, a creature’s saving throw bonus is equal to its level. (Most creatures in the roleplaying rules wind up having save bonuses that average out close to their Hit Dice.) In the roleplaying rules, however, some creatures have better than normal saves. The miniatures rules handle

Illus. by D. Hanley

Higher Commander Rating Lawful alignment Int 13 or higher Wis 13 or higher Cha 13 or higher 5 ranks in Intimidate or Diplomacy Leadership feat Paladin or fighter Character level 6th or higher

STAT CARDS

Commander

Spell Resistance: Creatures with significant spell resistance in the roleplaying rules (generally higher than 10) have the Spell Resistance special ability in the miniatures rules. Thus, the Drow Wizard (with spell resistance 15) has Spell Resistance, but the Baaz Draconian (spell resistance 8) does not. Turn Undead: This ability works differently in the miniatures rules than in the roleplaying rules. It affects only the nearest Undead creature and is much more simplified. Give a cleric a Turn Undead rating equal to the cleric’s level. Clerics with particularly high Charisma scores or those with the Sun domain may have higher Turn Undead ratings, at your discretion. For a paladin, figure the Turn Undead rating the same way, based on the character’s effective cleric level for turning.

CHAPTER 4:

Powerful creatures don’t like following orders, so they usually have the Difficult special ability. This makes them harder to command effectively, balancing the increased benefit of having such powerful combatants. For example, the Troll miniature has the Difficult 5 ability. Creatures with Intelligence scores of 1 or 2 usually have very high Difficult ratings, such as 20 in the case of wild animals. If you want a creature to be able to act on its own but not be a commander, give it the Independent special ability. Although rare in general, this ability is especially good for PCs that you’re converting for use with the miniatures rules.

Lower Commander Rating Chaotic alignment Int 8 or less Wis 8 or less Cha 8 or less Rogue, sorcerer, or wizard Character level 1st or 2nd

Named Special Abilities Many special abilities in the roleplaying rules also appear with the same name in the miniatures rules, such as Sneak Attack. In these cases, simply use the miniatures version of the special ability. Damage Reduction: Most creatures with damage reduction in the roleplaying rules have the Damage Reduction special ability in the miniatures rules, regardless of any vulnerability. Give the creature damage reduction 10 if its value in the roleplaying rules is 15 or higher; otherwise give it damage reduction 5. The more punishing damage reduction rules work fine in a roleplaying campaign, in which the PCs likely have a lot of resources and can usually avoid battles that they can’t hope to win. In a competitive battle, however, damage reduction of a higher value or that is more difficult to overcome could make a lot of battles unwinnable for one side—and thus, no fun.

Ogre Ravager

81

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:03 AM Page 82

this advantage with the Save +4 and Save +8 special abilities. In general, give Save +4 to the following creatures: Dragons Dwarves Monks Paladins Rogues of 7th and higher level A creature that falls into multiple categories, such as a dwarf monk, may get Save +8 instead of Save +4.

STAT CARDS

CHAPTER 4:

Feats and Skills Most skills don’t affect a creature’s abilities in the miniatures rules. One exception is Tumble: If the creature has a high score in this skill, this usually translates as the Mobility special ability. High scores in Diplomacy and Intimidate, as noted above, are typical for commanders. A number of feats, such as Precise Shot, translate more or less directly to the miniatures rules. Others, such as Dodge or Power Attack, instead alter a creature’s combat statistics.

Spells Only spells that have combat utility appear on a creature’s stat card in the miniatures rules. These spells generally resemble their roleplaying versions but often have simplified effects for ease of play. Spells use a special format to summarize their effects.

creature that has Fearless (such as a paladin) has a cost of about 8 times its CR.

PLAYER CHARACTERS IN THE MINIATURES RULES Player characters converted for use with the miniatures rules should be joined to factions that match their alignments. For these purposes, you may shift alignment slightly to reflect the sorts of warbands or armies that the character is likely to join. Player characters from the roleplaying rules can become commanders in the miniatures rules. A character’s status as a commander lets the player control that character plus an array of troops in battle. Even a Commander rating of 0 allows a PC to put other creatures under command. If you are converting a whole party of PCs, and they are not commanding other creatures, then you should choose one to be the commander. That character receives a Commander rating, while other party members should have the Independent special ability. An individual character always has the Unique special ability. As commanders, PCs are very maneuverable and powerful. They may be too versatile to work well in the miniatures rules. Just as the Dungeon Master in a D&D roleplaying campaign chooses challenges appropriate to the PCs, so in the miniatures game should you take care to set up meaningful battles if you’re going to use wild cards such as D&D player characters.

Illus. by D. Hanley

Ignore Minor Features Small conditional bonuses or minor effects can often be ignored for purposes of the miniatures rules. It’s better to capture the style of a creature and make it easy to use in battle than try to simulate every detail and end up with a creature that slows down play.

DERIVING COSTS

There’s no formula for calculating a creature’s cost in the miniatures rules. A creature’s various combat ratings and special abilities can interact unusually, making it stronger or weaker in ways that a formula can’t capture. Any usable formula would be so inaccurate that your common sense would be a better guide. Thus, assigning a cost to a new creature is up to you and your friends.

Comparison The first thing to do is to compare the new creature to other creatures whose costs you know, and assign a cost that fits a creature of its power. This method is simple and direct, but it may take practice to get a good fit. A second approach is to estimate how much better the new creature is than another creature like it. As a rule of thumb, a creature that has twice the attack capability and twice the defense capability as another creature should cost twice as much as the first creature. If a creature has twice the attack capability but the same defensive capability (or the other way around), then it should cost about 40% more than the first creature.

Challenge Rating

82

A creature’s Challenge Rating also gives you a rough idea of what its cost might be. As a rough estimate, a creature’s cost is about 5 times its CR. Having the Fearless special ability, however, is a big benefit in the miniatures rules, so an Undead creature or other

Brass Dragon

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:04 AM Page 83

Illus. by D. Hanley

n haunted ruins and deep in accursed dungeons, elite strike teams clash in furious battles. This chapter provides the rules for fast, tactical miniatures battles called skirmishes.

BUILDING A WARBAND

In a skirmish, two or more competing warbands fight. Warbands are composed of creatures (these rules refer to both characters and monsters as “creatures”). When building a warband, first choose the faction (Lawful Good, Chaotic Good, Lawful Evil, or Chaotic Evil) the warband belongs to. Each creature’s stat card gives its game statistics, including a faction symbol and abbreviation that show which faction or factions it can fight for. A creature’s faction does not necessarily correspond to its alignment in the roleplaying game.

WARBAND CONSTRUCTION After choosing a faction, start selecting creatures to fight in your warband. You can spend up to 100 points to build your warband. Cost: Each creature has a point cost, shown on the miniature’s base and in the top right corner of its stat card. Creature Limit: No warband can contain more than twelve creatures. Factions: Your warband can contain creatures that possess your faction’s symbol. Some creatures have symbols of two or four factions and can fight for any of those factions. Commanders: At least one of the creatures in your warband should have a Commander rating. Without a commander,

your warband fights less effectively, your creatures are more likely to flee, and they don’t have access to Commander Effects. Difficult Creatures: Be careful about creatures with the Difficult special ability. If a creature’s Difficult rating is higher than your best commander’s Commander rating, the creature will spend the whole skirmish out of command. Warband Building Abilities: Some commanders have special abilities that allow you to break the faction rules when building your warband. For example, you can have Orc creatures (including Half-Orcs) of any faction in your warband if there’s a Cleric of Gruumsh in it.

Table 5–1: Sample Warband Creature 1 Vadania, Half-Elf Druid (Cmdr 2) 1 Jozan, Human Cleric 1 Wild Elf Barbarian 2 Wood Elf Skirmisher 1 Crested Felldrake 4 Wolf Total cost

Cost 22 4 13 36 5 20 100

Warband Etiquette Construct your warband in secret, using the stat cards. Don’t identify which creatures you’re using yet; just keep your hand of stat cards ready. You reveal your warband during the Terrain Initiative phase of setup, as described in the following section.

83

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:04 AM Page 84

SETUP

To prepare for battle, you’ll need to define the contested ground.

Small or Medium creature’s space

SKIRMISH RULES Illus. by D. Hanley

CHAPTER 5:

Start with a battle grid, a map overlaid with 1-inch squares. Two published battle grids are available: in the D&D Miniatures Entry Pack (22 inches by 34 inches) and the DUNGEON MASTER’s Guide (19 inches by 28 inches). Any size will do, though, depending on how big a skirmish you want. The edges of the battle grid are impassable walls. The only way off is through the exit squares. These are either the five squares in a corner (marked on the Entry Pack battle grid) or three squares along a side (for players not starting in a corner).

corner

centerpoint Large creature’s space

Seating Arrange players around the battle grid according to how many are involved. Two Players: Players sit at opposite corners. Three Players: Two players choose corners at the opposite ends of the same long edge. The third player starts in the middle of the opposite long edge. Four Players: Each player chooses one of the four corners. To avoid crowding, put two battle grids together or use a bigger battle grid. Five or More Players: Players start evenly spaced around the perimeter. To avoid crowding, put two battle grids together or use a bigger battle grid. Contested Starting Area: If players don’t agree about their seating around the battle grid, roll dice to see who chooses to sit where. Bigger Battle Grids: You can use a larger battle grid even for two- or three-player games, but doing so will change the balance of power. For example, creatures with ranged attacks are more powerful on larger battle grids, and creatures with low speed are less powerful.

CHOOSE TERRAIN TILES Each player brings four terrain tiles to the skirmish. One terrain tile (but no more than one) must be an assembly tile (the words “Assembly Tile” are printed in one corner). The remaining three tiles are feature tiles; no single player can choose two of the same terrain tiles. The appendix contains

square

border

BATTLE GRID

intersection

corners

border

The Battle Grid

examples of various terrain; you can photocopy these and cut them out for use as terrain tiles in skirmishes. If you are playing a two-player game, or a four -player game on a double-size battle grid, each player uses all four tiles. If you’re playing a three-player game on a standard battle grid or a game with five or more players on a double-size battle grid, each player uses only three tiles—the assembly tile plus two feature tiles.

TERRAIN INITIATIVE Each player rolls 1d20 to determine who controls the terrain initiative. Reveal your warband and add the Commander rating of your best commander to your roll. The player with the highest result places his or her assembly tile in his or her starting space; then the other players do the same one at a time, proceeding clockwise around the table.

Placing Terrain Tiles Barghest

Terrain tiles must be placed so that their squares line up with the squares of the battle grid. The first tile you place must be your assembly tile. If you’re starting in a corner, the square labeled “Exit Corner” goes in the

pqs CASUAL SETUP VARIANT If you and your friends prefer, you can just set up the map in interesting ways before each skirmish instead of using the competitive method of terrain setup described here. The setup rules presented here make sure that there are always 2 squares between walls, so that Large creatures can move through the space easily. Make sure your maps follow the same rule.

pqs

84

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:04 AM Page 85

After all terrain tiles are placed, the player who placed the first terrain tile sets up his warband on his assembly tile. Then the next player sets up her warband on her assembly tile, and so on. Place each creature so that it occupies squares that are free of walls and statues. It’s okay to set up on difficult terrain (indicated with a lightcolored triangle).

SKIRMISH BASICS

Mummy

INITIATIVE CHECK To make an initiative check, roll 1d20 and add the highest Commander rating among the active commanders in your warband. Stunned, routing, confused, or helpless commanders don’t improve an initiative check. The player with the highest initiative check result chooses who goes first in the round. Play passes clockwise around the table from the player who goes first. (Sometimes you’ll want to go first; other times you’ll want to see what your opponents are up to before committing your forces.) If two or more players tie for the highest initiative check result, the player with the highest Commander rating wins. If there’s still a tie, the tied players reroll. Example: Mike has the Half- Orc Fighter (Commander 3) in his warband and rolls a 4 on 1d20. His initiative check result for the round is 7 (4 + 3). Jennifer has the Elf Ranger (Commander 2) in her warband and rolls a 12. Her initiative

Illus. by R. Wright

Once you have chosen your warband and set up the battle grid, you and your opponents take turns activating the creatures in your warbands. You win by destroying or driving off enemy creatures whose total cost equals or exceeds your warband’s total cost. You also win by eliminating all the enemy creatures.

A skirmish is played in rounds. Begin the round by making an initiative check. In each round, players complete phases in order. During each phase in which you act, you activate two creatures in your warband; one creature takes its turn, then the next does so. (You can activate a particular creature only once in a round.) A round ends when all players have activated all their creatures once. (You might have to wait for your opponents if they have more creatures than you do.) Then a new round begins.

CHAPTER 5:

ASSEMBLE YOUR WARBAND

ROUNDS

SKIRMISH RULES

corner square. If you’re starting on an edge, lay three of the tile’s “Exit” squares (including the “Exit Corner” square) on the three squares that define your starting place. Each player places a terrain tile in order, one at a time, until everyone has run out of tiles or until there is no room for more terrain tiles on the battle grid. You can never place terrain tiles on top of other terrain tiles. You can place a terrain tile anywhere on the battle grid as long as doing so does not create a 1square gap between two walls. You can place a terrain tile so that its wall is adjacent to another wall only if the other wall forms the edge of the battle grid.

Two-Player Terrain Setup Two players set up for a battle. First, each puts an assembly tile in his or her starting corner (tiles 1 and 2). Then they take turns placing tiles: 3 (Shrine), 4 (Rubble Room), 5 (Corridor), 6 (Abattoir), and 7 (Treasure Room). You can line walls up along the edges of the battle grid but not touching one another. Leave at least a 2-square gap so Large creatures can get through. Terrain tiles can touch as long as you leave a 2-square gap between walls. By the time six tiles have been placed, there are only two legal positions for the Treasure Room: where it is currently located or 2 squares to the left (up against the edge of the battle grid.) The last tile (Statue Room) can’t be placed because there’s no legal place for it to fit on the battle grid.

85

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:05 AM Page 86

check result is 14 (12 + 2), so she gets to decide who goes first in this round.

SKIRMISH RULES

The first player completes a phase by activating two creatures in his or her warband, one at a time. (You can change the direction a creature is facing or flip over its stat card to indicate that it has been activated.) Everybody completes phases in order until all creatures have been activated. Actions a specific creature takes during its activation are referred to as that creature’s turn.

Illus. by A. Smith

CHAPTER 5:

PHASES

86

ACTIVATE CREATURES During each phase in the round, you activate two creatures, one at a time. An activated creature can perform one of the following activities. —Move its speed and then make one attack, or make one attack and then move. —Move up to double its speed. —Not move and make multiple attacks, if it can do so. —Charge. Instead of making its attacks, a creature can cast a spell or use a special ability, such as Turn Undead. Players each activate two creatures per phase until every creature on the battle grid has been activated once, ending the round. If you have an odd number of creatures in your warband, on your last phase you’ll only have one creature to activate. If you have many more creatures than your opponents, you’ll probably get to activate many creatures in a row at the end of the round.

Move and Make One Attack A creature’s speed is measured in squares. For example, a creature with a speed of 6 can move up to 6 squares in a single move. A creature that moves up to its speed can also make one attack or perform a standard action, such as casting a spell. It can move first and then attack, or attack first and then move. Creatures that move at all on their turn can’t make multiple attacks. If a moving creature has more than one attack listed on its stat card, and the attacks deal different amounts of damage, it can choose which attack to use. Note: Creatures that are out of command when they start their turn have their speed reduced to 2.

Move up to Double Speed A creature that doesn’t do anything else can move up to double speed during its turn.

Not Move and Make Multiple Attacks If a creature doesn’t move during its turn, it can make multiple melee or ranged attacks if it has the capability (this is also called making a full attack). All its attacks must be of the same sort (melee or ranged). A creature with multiple attacks can make one of its attacks and then move up to its speed instead of taking the rest of its attacks. Not all creatures are capable of making more than one attack in a turn. See the rules for making attacks and dealing damage, below.

Charge A creature can charge the nearest enemy that it can see, subject to certain conditions.

Few can withstand the minotaur’s powerful charge.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:05 AM Page 87

Sword of Heironeous

1

3

Command Range

2

A commander can command allies that it can see or that are within 6 squares.

4 4

6

Dwarf Axefighter

Halfling Veteran

line of sight blocked

line of sight OK

SKIRMISH RULES

5, 6

CHAPTER 5:

5

The Sword of Heironeous can command the Dwarf Axefighter or the Man-at-Arms, an-at-Arms, but not the Halfling Veteran or the Sun Soul Initiate.

Sun Soul Initiate

Man-at-Arms

To charge, a creature moves at double speed directly toward the nearest enemy within line of sight and must finish its movement in the closest space adjacent to that enemy (including diagonally adjacent). If nothing slows it down and it moves at least 2 squares, that creature can make a single melee attack against that enemy with a +2 bonus on its attack roll.

COMMAND

When you activate a creature, first determine whether it is under command. A creature is under command if it meets one or more of the following conditions. —It is within 6 squares of one of the commanders in its warband. —It has line of sight to one of the commanders in its warband. —It is a commander. If the creature does not meet any of these conditions, it is out of command. Creatures that are out of command are more restricted in what actions they can take.

turn. It moves up to double its normal speed toward that enemy and can take any path, so long as it ends its movement adjacent to that enemy. (It can even charge if it’s able to meet the conditions; see Charging, below). Being out of command

Walls and Distance When determining distance for command, count around walls, not through them. As with movement, do not trace diagonals across the corners of walls. Here, the Sword of Heironeous is within 6 squares of the Dwarf Axefighter, so it can put the Dwarf Axefighter under command and bestow its Commander on the Dwarf even 5 6 Effect Orc Berserker though the wall blocks line of sight. 4 Dwarf Axefighter

COMMAND AND MOVEMENT A creature under command can move using its listed speed, unless that creature is routing (see Morale) or helpless. A creature that is out of command moves much slower; it is considered to have a speed of 2. Exception: An out of command creature can rush toward the nearest enemy it can see if it can reach that enemy during its

pqs SPECIAL ABILITIES THAT INFLUENCE COMMAND

2, 3

1 Sword of Heironeous

Some creatures are Difficult or Independent. These special abilities can influence whether a creature is under command. For details, see the glossary at the end of this chapter.

pqs

87

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:05 AM Page 88

Movement While Out of Command The Gnoll is out of command, so its speed is 2. It could move 2 squares to square A and attack the Dwarf Axefighter. It could move 4 squares along route B, to get away from the Elf Archer’s ranged attack and from the Dwarf Axefighter.

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

4 2 A

2,3 1

B

1 2

3

4

Gnoll

1

Dwarf Axefighter

The other option is to rush the nearest enemy it can see. The Man-at-Arms and the Elf Archer are each 8 squares away, so it can choose which of these two equidistant enemies it wishes to rush. It moves at up to double its normal speed, and it must end up adjacent to one of these creatures (as in route C, for example). It can even make a charge attack if its route is direct and its path is clear (as in route D).

1 2

2,3

3

4

4

5,6 5,6

7

D

7 8 Elf Archer

C

an-at-Arms Man-at-Arms

9 10,11 Iff the Gnoll had started this turn under command, it could move in any direction, including up to 12 squares away from all these enemies.

88

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:06 AM Page 89

limits a creature’s options: It’s either really slow or it recklessly rushes into combat.

Man-at-Arms

1

WHEN COMMANDERS CAN’T COMMAND Only active commanders can put other creatures under command. A commander who is routing, stunned, confused, or helpless can’t put any creature under command, not even itself. Its Commander Effect also does not function under these circ*mstances.

Minotaur

1

2

3

MOVEMENT

During its turn, a creature can move up to its speed and attack, or attack and then move up to its speed. It can also decide not to attack and instead take a second move, moving up to double speed. Out of Command: A creature that is out of command has its speed reduced to 2 unless it rushes the nearest enemy during that turn (see Command and Movement, above). Diagonals: When moving or counting along a diagonal path, the first diagonal counts as 1 square, the second as 2 squares, the third as 1, and so on, as shown in the diagram on this page. Other Creatures: A creature can move through a space occupied by an ally, but it can’t end its move in an occupied square,

CHAPTER 5:

If a creature starts its turn under command, it moves as though under command for its entire turn, even if it winds up moving out of command during its turn. Conversely, a creature that starts its turn out of command moves as though out of command for its entire turn, even if it becomes under command during its turn. However, a creature is subject to a commander’s Commander Effect whenever it is within 6 squares of that commander, whether or not it started its turn under command.

SKIRMISH RULES

A creature can’t move diagonally past the corner of a wall. It costs a Small or 2 Medium creature only 2 squares to move around the corner, while a Large creature such as the Minotaur has to use 3 squares of movement to do so.

Becoming Under or Out of Command

Moving around Corners

Moving and Other Creatures Dwarf Axefighter

Man-atArms

Gnoll

Diagonals 1

A creature can move through a space occupied by an ally, but it can’t end its move in an occupied square, and it can’t charge through that square, either. A creature cannot move through a space occupied by an enemy.

2, 3

4

5, 6

If you move or count distance diagonally, the first diagonal counts as 1 square, the second counts as 2 squares, the third counts as 1, the fourth as 2, and so on. (If it helps, you can think of a diagonal as a distance of 1 1/2 squares.) The Gnoll, with a speed of 6, can move 4 squares diagonally (counted as 6 squares of movement) and still attack the Man-at-Arms.

and it can’t charge through that square, either. A creature cannot move through a space occupied by an enemy. Corners: A creature can’t move diagonally past the corner or end of a wall.

DIFFICULT TERRAIN Rubble and other difficult terrain slows movement. It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing difficult terrain (3 squares if it’s a diagonal move). All difficult terrain has the same game effect. Difficult terrain, or anything else that slows movement, prevents a creature from charging. Large creatures occupy a space 2 squares wide and 2 squares long. They pay the extra costs for moving into difficult terrain if any part of their space moves into a square containing difficult terrain.

Man-at-Arms

MINIMUM MOVE A creature can always use its turn to move 1 square in any direction, even diagonally, regardless of how many squares the move

89

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:06 AM Page 90

Man-at-Arms an-at-Arms

Difficult Terrain

3,4

5,6,7 SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

1, 2

difficult terrain

8

Difficult terrain, such as rubble, uneven cave floors, thick undergrowth, and so on, slows movement. Each square counts as 2 squares when moving into any difficult terrain. Each diagonal move counts as 3 squares ( just as two diagonal moves normally do).

Illus. by S. Tappin

Gnoll

90

counts as. (This rule doesn’t allow a creature to move through impassable terrain or to move when all movement is prohibited, such as while paralyzed.) Large Fire Elemental SQUEEZING If you follow the standard terrain setup rules, Large creatures will never have to squeeze into spaces smaller than their own, such as 1-square-wide corridors. When playing on terrain you’ve made yourself, or using alternative setup rules, you may encounter situations in which a Large creature needs to squeeze through a narrow passage. A Large creature can squeeze through an opening that is at least half as wide as its normal space. For example, an Ogre occupies a space that is 2 squares wide, so it can squeeze into a 1-square-wide space. When a Large creature moves into a narrow space, it takes up two squares instead of four. Every square of movement, however, costs double (2 squares, or 3 squares diagonally). In addition, a creature that’s squeezing into a narrow space also takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls and a –4 penalty to Armor Class. You might even create custom terrain with corridors that are less than a full square wide. In this case, Small creatures can move through such a corridor normally, but

Medium creatures have to squeeze, and Large creatures can’t get through at all. You could also have doorways less than 1 square wide, which Small creatures pass through normally, Medium creatures spend 1 additional square of movement to pass through, and Large creatures can’t fit through.

ATTACKS AND DAMAGE

The rules for melee attacks and ranged attacks are similar. All creatures have a melee attack, but only some are able to make ranged attacks.

MELEE ATTACKS To make a melee attack, a creature must be in a square adjacent to the enemy it is attacking. This includes a diagonally adjacent square. Target of Melee Attacks: An attacking creature can target any adjacent enemy. Some creatures have the Melee Reach special ability, which allows them to attack creatures that aren’t adjacent to them. These creatures still choose targets freely; they don’t have to attack the nearest enemy, as a creature making a ranged attack does.

Attack Rolls When your creature attacks, you make an attack roll. Roll 1d20, add the creature’s melee attack rating, and add any other modifiers that apply (see Table 5–2 for the list of melee attack modifiers). If the result of an attack roll equals or exceeds the enemy’s Armor Class, the attack hits. The attacking creature deals its melee damage, which reduces the enemy’s hit points.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:41 AM Page 91

Squeezing Movement 4

3

Gnoll

1

CHAPTER 5:

2

The Minotaur can also move through its own ally (the Gnoll), but it cannot end its movement after 2 or 3 squares because it is not allowed to occupy a square containing another creature. Instead it has to continue moving until it passes the Gnoll, using all 4 squares of movement. The Minotaur could move 1 square toward the Dwarf Axefighter, but is not allowed to squeeze past or move through the Dwarf Axefighter to the open corridor beyond.

SKIRMISH RULES

The Minotaur is out of command, so its speed is 2. The Minotaur can take a double move away from the Dwarf Fighter by squeezing into the 1-square-wide corridor. Each square it moves counts as 2 squares when squeezing, so it will have to stop after it has spent 3 squares of movement. (It only has 1 square of movement left, and squeezing another square would cost 2.)

1 1

Minotaur

2, 3 (squeezing) Dwarf Axefighter

Natural 20 Is a Critical Hit: If you roll a natural 20 when making an attack roll (a roll of 20 on the die, regardless of modifiers), the attack automatically hits, no matter how high the defender’s AC. A critical hit deals double damage. Some creatures are immune to critical hits and do not take double damage, but a natural 20 still hits automatically. Natural 1 Is an Automatic Miss: If you roll a natural 1 when making an attack roll (a roll of 1 on the die, regardless of modifiers), the attack automatically misses, no matter how low the defender’s AC. Extra Damage: Some attacks deal extra damage, shown by a “+” sign. For example, the Large Fire Elemental’s melee attack deals “10 + 5 fire.” Extra damage is not doubled on a critical hit.

Dealing Damage and Losing Hit Points Attacks that hit deal damage which reduces an enemy’s hit points. You can use counters to keep track of damage. Reduced to Half Hit Points: You don’t always have to kill enemy creatures to win. Sometimes a badly injured creature flees from battle. When a creature’s hit points first drop to half its starting total or lower, it must make a morale save to keep from running away. See Morale, below, for more information. Reduced to 0 Hit Points: When a creature’s hit points drop to 0 or lower, it is destroyed and removed from the battle grid.

Special Abilities and Damage Sometimes a special ability deals damage, or it adds to the damage dealt by an attack. See the description of the special ability in the glossary at the end of this chapter for its effects.

ATTACKS OF OPPORTUNITY A creature threatens the squares adjacent to it. With a few exceptions, if an enemy moves out of a square threatened by an active

creature, the creature can make a single immediate melee attack against that enemy. This is called an attack of opportunity. A creature can’t make an attack of opportunity against a creature that has cover relative to it (for example, an adjacent creature around the corner of a wall), or against a creature that the attacker cannot see (such as one with the Invisible special ability). There is no limit to the number of attacks of opportunity a creature can make in a round, but it can make only one during a given creature’s turn. A creature does not have to make an attack of opportunity when one is available.

Timing A creature makes an attack of opportunity in response to an enemy’s movement. The attack takes place when the enemy is about to leave the threatened square, but before it actually does. Pause the movement and make the attack; if the enemy survives, it continues moving. If creatures from several different warbands are able to make an attack of opportunity, resolve attacks in play order (acting player first, then clockwise around the table).

pqs ATTACKING ALLIED CREATURES A creature may not make a melee attack or ranged attack against an allied creature. This restriction doesn’t prohibit the use of special abilities and spell effects that target or affect allies—only melee attacks and ranged attacks. If you happen to destroy or rout your own creature with a spell or special ability, your opponents score victory points, splitting up the creature’s cost among them.

pqs

91

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:42 AM Page 92

Flanking

Sword of Heironeous +2

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

Sun Soul Initiate

When making a melee attack, a creature gets a +2 flanking bonus on the attack if the creature being attacked is in a square threatened by an enemy on its opposite side or opposite corner. When in doubt about whether two creatures flank one between them, trace an imaginary line between the two creatures’ centers. If this line passes through opposite borders of the defender’s space (including corners of those borders), then those creatures are flanking it.

Orc Berserker

Only a creature that threatens the defender’s square can help an attacker get the flanking bonus.

Halfling Veteran +2

If a creature takes up more than one square, any square it occupies counts for flanking.

Man-at-Arms Dwarf Axefighter (stunned)

Here, the Sword of Heironeous and the Halfling Veteran give each other flanking bonuses. The Man-at-Arms gets no bonus because there’s no enemy of the Orc Berserker on the opposite side. The Sun Soul Initiate doesn’t get the bonus because the Dwarf Axefighter is stunned (and therefore doesn’t threaten the square that the Orc is in).

Choose Your Attack An attack of opportunity is a single melee attack. If the attacking creature can make multiple melee attacks that deal different amounts or types of damage, it can choose which attack to use for its attack of opportunity.

Line of Sight A creature can’t make an attack of opportunity if it doesn’t have line of sight to the enemy. No attacks of opportunity can be made through walls or against invisible enemies, for example.

Flanking When making a melee attack, a creature gets a +2 bonus on the attack roll if the creature being attacked is in a square threatened by an enemy on its opposite side or opposite corner. When in doubt about whether two creatures flank a defender between them, trace an imaginary line between the two creatures’ centers. If this line passes through opposite borders of the defender’s space (including corners of those borders), then those creatures are flanking it. Only a creature that threatens the defender’s square can help an attacker get the bonus for flanking. Stunned or helpless creatures, for example, can’t grant bonuses for flanking. If a creature takes up more than one square, any square it occupies counts for flanking. Your creature gains a bonus for flanking even if the creature on the opposite side of the creature being attacked isn’t in your warband. In a three-player game, for example, your creature and another player’s creature grant bonuses to each other when they’re on opposite sides of a third player’s creature.

Cover and Melee Combat

92

You can’t make an attack of opportunity against an enemy that has cover. If an enemy creature is adjacent but around a

corner or the end of a wall, that creature does not provoke attacks of opportunity when it moves away. (See below for full rules on cover.)

Flanking, Large Creatures The Dwarf Axefighter and Man-at-Arms A are flanking the Ogre. So are the Dwarf Axefighter and Man-at-Arms B. Man-at-Arms C, however, isn’t flanking the Ogre. The line from its center to the Dwarf ’s center doesn’t pass through opposite borders of the Ogre’s space. Dwarf Axefighter +2

Ogre Man-at-Arms C

Man-at-Arms A +2

Man-at-Arms B +2

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:42 AM Page 93

Cover in Melee

Dwarf Axefighter

Charging Blocked The Dwarf Axefighter can’t charge the Orc Berserker for any of three reasons.

1. It can’t end its movement in the closest space from which it could attack the Orc, because another creature (a Man-at-Arms) occupies that space.

Man-atArms

Man-atArms

Dwarf Axefighter Gnoll

In melee, a defender has cover if any line from the attacker’s space to the defender’s space passes through a wall. For example, the Orc Berserker has cover against the Dwarf Axefighter (and vice versa). The presence of the Gnoll, on the other hand, does not provide the Orc Berserker or the Man-at-Arms with cover from each other.

CHARGING A creature might be able to charge the nearest enemy. To charge, a creature moves at double speed directly toward the nearest enemy it can see at the start of its turn. If two or more

Dwarf Axefighter

Charging

When charging, a creature Man-at-Arms moves up to double speed (and at least 2 squares) along the shortest path to the closest space from which it can attack the nearest enemy it can see. If any line traced between the creature’s starting space and ending space passes through a square that slows or prevents movement, or contains an ally, the charge is not allowed. At the end of the charge, the creature makes one melee attack with a +2 bonus against the creature it was charging.

Orc Berserker Even though the Dwarf Axefighter’s speed is 4, it can charge 5 spaces and attack the Orc Berserker. A creature can’t charge if it starts its turn in a square threatened by an enemy.

Man-atArms The charging Dwarf must move to the nearest square from which it could attack the Orc. In this case, the nearest square is occupied.

3. The path goes through a square occupied by an ally (a Man-at-Arms).

SKIRMISH RULES

2. The path goes through a square containing a wall, which blocks movement.

CHAPTER 5:

Orc Berserker

Any one of these obstacles by itself would keep the Dwarf from charging.

Orc Berserker

enemies are equally near, you choose which one your creature charges. If nothing slows it down and it moves at least 2 squares, that creature can make a single melee attack against that enemy with a +2 bonus on its attack roll. The charging creature must move to the nearest space from which it can attack the nearest enemy. If this space is blocked or occupied, the creature can’t charge. If any line traced between the creature’s starting space and ending space passes through a square that slows or prevents movement, or contains a creature (even an ally), the charge is not allowed. A creature can’t charge if it starts its turn in a square threatened by an enemy. If anything prevents a creature from charging the nearest enemy, it can’t charge at all.

FULL ATTACK Some creatures are capable of making more than one melee attack during a single turn. This fact is noted on a creature’s stat card (by the notation +12/+12, for example). To attack more than once during its turn, a creature must make a full attack. When a creature makes a full attack, it can’t move at all during that turn. You don’t have to decide on the target of all attacks ahead of time. You can wait to see the result of the first attack, then make the next attack against a different creature if you wish. You can even make one attack and then have the creature move rather than take the rest of its attacks.

RANGED ATTACKS While melee attacks are always against enemies in adjacent squares, ranged attacks usually target enemies that are farther away. Not all creatures can make ranged attacks. To make a ranged attack, a creature must have a ranged attack rating on its stat card. It must also be able to see its enemy. This is called having line of

93

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:43 AM Page 94

A Ranged Attack’s Range Most ranged attacks can target enemies anywhere on the battle grid, provided the attacking creature has line of sight. A few creatures have ranged attacks that can only target an enemy up to 6 squares away. A creature can’t make a ranged attack if it is in a square threatened by an enemy. Exceptions: If an attacker has cover in melee relative to an enemy creature (usually because it is around a corner or the end of a wall), it can make a ranged attack against that enemy. Usually that enemy will be the nearest enemy, so in this situation it is possible to make a ranged attack against an adjacent creature. Similarly, if an adjacent enemy creature cannot see the would-be ranged attacker (usually as a consequence of an invisibility or blindness spell), the attacker can use its ranged attack. If you’re playing on an exceptionally large battle grid, you can limit ranged attacks to a range of 24 squares.

Cover against Ranged Attacks Orc Berserker

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

The Orc has cover from the wall (+4 AC).

The Gnoll gets cover (+4 AC) from the Ranger. (The Archer is also shooting into melee, so the Gnoll gets another +4 bonus to AC, for a total of +8 to its AC against this ranged attack.)

The Archer has line of sight to both the Orc and the Gnoll.

Elf Archer

Elf Ranger

Gnoll

To determine whether a creature has cover against a ranged attack, the attacker chooses a corner of a square in its space. If any line from this corner to any part of the defender’s space passes through a square or border that blocks line of sight or that provides cover, or through a square occupied by another creature, the defender has cover (+4 bonus to AC).

Targets of Ranged Attacks A creature must make its ranged attack against the nearest enemy it can see. This frequently means taking a shot against an enemy that has cover when there is a clear target farther away. Wise players move their ranged attackers first to get clear shots against the nearest targets. A creature with more than one ranged attack might be able to attack multiple targets. If its first attack destroys the nearest enemy or causes that creature to rout, it can make its next attack against the next nearest enemy.

If the Gnoll and the Elf Ranger switched places, the Gnoll would no longer have cover against the Elf Archer’s shot (though it would still get the +4 bonus to AC because the Archer is shooting into melee).

sight to the enemy. The accompanying diagram shows how to determine line of sight. Some spells and special abilities behave like ranged attacks and follow the same rules.

Cover Creatures and certain terrain features, such as walls, trees, and statues, provide cover against ranged attacks. Cover makes it harder to hit an enemy.

Orc Berserker

Line of Sight: Who Sees Whom

line of sight OK Gnoll

Two creatures can see each other if they can trace at least one unblocked straight line between any part of one creature’s space to any part of the other creature’s space. This line is unblocked if it does not intersect or even touch squares that block line of sight. (You’ll usually want to try and “see” from the corners of your space because they have the best angles for full vision.)

line of sight blocked

Elf Archer

94

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:43 AM Page 95

Shooting around Corners

Orc Berserker

The Elf Archer does have cover against the Orc Berserker, but the Orc could still charge 2 squares and attack the Elf. That attack would be across the corner, though, so the Elf would get a +4 bonus to AC from cover.

Illus. by S. Tappin

To determine whether a creature has cover from a ranged attack, the player who controls the attacking creature chooses a corner of a square in the attacking creature’s space. If any line traced from this point to any part of the target’s space passes

through a square or border that provides cover, the target has cover. The target does not have cover if the line runs along or merely touches the edge of a wall or other square that would otherwise provide cover. Cover grants a +4 bonus to the target’s Armor Class. It’s even possible to gain a cover bonus against a melee attack, if the defender is around a corner or the end of a wall. The defender has cover if any line from the attacker’s space to the defender’s space passes through a wall.

CHAPTER 5:

Medusa

SKIRMISH RULES

Elf Archer

Since a ranged attack originates from the attacker’s chosen corner, a creature can shoot around the corner of a wall at no penalty. The Orc Berserker has no cover against the Elf Archer’s ranged attack because the sight lines from the Elf ’s chosen corner run along the border of the wall, not through it.

Cover, Large Creatures In melee, a Large attacker can choose any square it occupies to determine if an opponent has cover against its melee attacks. Likewise, when making a melee attack against a Large creature, an attacker can pick any square the Large creature occupies to determine if it has cover. Ranged attacks follow the standard cover rule. If any line from the attacker’s chosen corner to any part of the defender’s space passes through a square or border that blocks line of sight or that provides cover, or through a square occupied by another creature, the defender gets cover (+4 bonus to AC).

The wall grants the Ogre cover.

Elf Ranger

no cover either way

Ogre

Elf Archer

95

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:44 AM Page 96

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

no line of sight

Elf Archer

Line of Sight and Cover

Orc Berserker

A line that runs along a wall or that nicks the corner of a wall does not provide line of sight. But if some other line does provide line of sight, a line that runs along a wall or that nicks a corner also does not grant cover. When determining line of sight or cover, cover don’t count lines that run along walls or that nick their corners.

no cover Orc Berserker

Elf Archer

no cover Elf Archer Elf Archer

Orc Berserker

no line of sight

Orc Berserker Elf Archer no line of sight

no cover Elf Archer

Orc Berserker

96

Orc Berserker

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:44 AM Page 97

ATTACK MODIFIERS

Quickest Path

Special situations can modify a creature’s attack rolls or affect a creature’s Armor Class. These modifiers are summarized in the following two tables.

Table 5–2: Melee Attack Modifiers

Defender temporarily has the Conceal 11 special ability (see glossary)

CHAPTER 5:

+2 bonus on attack roll +2 bonus on attack roll –2 penalty to AC +2 bonus on attack roll Automatic hit, double damage +4 bonus to AC

SKIRMISH RULES

Attacker charging Attacker flanking (see diagrams) Defender stunned Defender unable to see attacker1 Defender paralyzed, asleep, or otherwise helpless Defender has cover (from a corner of a wall, usually) Attacker unable to see defender

Move a routing creature along the most efficient path toward its exit corner. This could be a path that is not straight, as long as it gets the routing creature closer to the exit corner than other paths do. If an opponent shows you a path that gets the routing creature closer to the exit corner, it must take that path. (This might mean that it moves past adjacent enemies, which can make attacks of opportunity against it.) If the routing creature’s movement takes it off the battle grid, it is eliminated and out of the game. A Large creature occupies 4 squares; it exits when any one of those squares moves off the battle grid. A routing creature’s goal is to get off the battle grid safely. It does not have to leave by the exit corner itself. If a routing creature is on one of its warband’s “Exit” squares and could move off the battle grid using its next square of movement, it does so instead of moving closer to the “Exit Corner” square.

Table 5–3: Ranged Attack Modifiers Defender in melee2 Defender has cover Defender stunned Defender unable to see attacker1 Defender paralyzed, asleep, or otherwise helpless

+4 bonus to AC +4 bonus to AC –2 penalty to AC +2 bonus on attack roll +4 bonus on attack roll, normal damage

MORALE

Damage, and the effects of some special abilities and spells, can force creatures to rout. When a creature routs, it breaks and runs, attempting to leave the battlefield. To determine if a creature routs, make a morale save. Roll 1d20 and add the creature’s level, then compare the result to the save’s DC (morale saves always have a DC of 20). If the save result equals or exceeds the DC, the save succeeds.

Routing creatures just run away. They can’t attack, cast spells, threaten adjacent squares, make attacks of opportunity, grant a bonus for flanking, use special abilities that have to be activated or targeted, or put other creatures under command. A routing creature’s speed is not reduced for being out of command. (It runs away as fast as it can!) A creature that starts its turn routing and does not rally (see below) spends its turn moving at double speed toward its exit corner.

Human Blackguard

Illus. by D. Hanley

1 When a creature attacks another creature that does not have line of sight to it, the attacking creature gains a +2 bonus on its attack roll. 2 If the target of a ranged attack threatens the square of the attacker’s ally or is in a square threatened by the attacker’s ally, that target creature gains a +4 bonus to AC. (This is slightly different from the rules in the roleplaying game.)

What Routing Creatures Do

REDUCED TO HALF HIT POINTS When a creature’s hit points drop to half its starting total, it must succeed on a morale save to avoid routing. If a creature has already made a morale save (successful or not) for being reduced to half its hit points, it doesn’t have to make another one.

COMMAND AND MORALE SAVES Any creature that is under command can also add the commander’s Commander rating to its morale save as a bonus. If a creature making a morale save is under the command of two or more commanders, use the highest Commander rating. A commander can use its own Commander rating or that of another commander, but not both. A commander can always add its Commander Rating to its own morale saves, even when it’s stunned or otherwise unable to command other creatures.

FAILING A MORALE SAVE If a creature fails its morale save, it routs. It immediately moves at double speed along the quickest path toward its warband’s exit corner (the square marked “Exit Corner” on the assembly tile its warband set up on).

97

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:44 AM Page 98

Routing Commanders

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

A routing commander cannot put another creature under command or give another creature a bonus on its morale save. A commander’s Commander Effect does not function while it is routing. A routing commander can try to rally itself (see below). It adds its own Commander rating to its morale save. Alternatively, a routing commander that has line of sight to, or is within 6 squares of, another allied commander can instead use that creature’s Commander rating.

READING SPELL DESCRIPTIONS

Routing and Attacks of Opportunity A routing creature is fleeing heedlessly, without enough control to avoid enemies. By taking the quickest path to the exit corner, routing creatures often move through squares adjacent to enemies and thus provoke attacks of opportunity. A routing creature that moves out of a square threatened by an enemy provokes an attack of opportunity. However, an enemy that has just dealt damage to a creature and caused it to rout doesn’t also get an attack of opportunity against that routing creature that turn.

Most spells (and some special abilities, such as Breath Weapons) are described on the stat cards using the following format. Name [number of uses] (range; radius [if any]; effects and conditions; save DC [if any]) For example, the Elf Pyromancer can cast one fireball spell. The spell entry on its stat card looks like this: fireball ❑ (sight; radius 4; 20 fire damage; DC 15) Explanations of each component in a spell description follow.

RALLYING A creature that starts its turn routing can rally if it is under command. It attempts another morale save to rally. If the save succeeds, the creature does nothing else during that turn, but it is no longer routing. If the save fails, the creature continues to rout, spending its turn moving at double speed toward its exit corner.

SPELLS

Some creatures can cast spells to help their warband or to devastate an opponent’s warband. On its turn, a creature with the ability to cast spells can cast a single spell instead of attacking. In other words, it can move up to its speed and cast a spell, or cast a spell and then move. (Being able to make multiple attacks doesn’t let a creature cast multiple spells.) Unlike ranged attacks, which can only target the nearest enemy, ranged spells (and special abilities) can target either the nearest enemy or the nearest ally. With a touch-range spell, a creature can target any adjacent creature. A creature can’t cast a spell if an enemy threatens a square it occupies. Exception: Spells that have a range of touch can be cast even when an enemy threatens the caster’s square. When a caster has cover in melee against an adjacent enemy, that enemy’s presence doesn’t keep it from casting spells. (That enemy is also likely to be the nearest enemy.)

GENERAL SPELL EFFECTS

98

warband; attack +1) on the same creature gives that creature a cumulative +2 bonus on attack rolls. No creature can benefit from two castings of the same spell; a second magic weapon spell cast on a creature already affected by an earlier casting of the spell does not provide any additional bonus. Spells with the words “greater,” “lesser,” “legion,” “mass,” or “swift” as the first word in their title are simply derived from other spells. Their effects do not stack with the effects of their related varieties.

Most spells that a creature can cast are described on that creature’s stat card using keywords and shorthand terms explained below. Spells are listed by level, from lowest to highest. A few of the more complicated spells, such as summon monster, are fully explained in the glossary at the end of this chapter. Spell Duration: Damage and Stun effects are instantaneous. Bonuses and abilities granted by spells, and other spell effects, last for the entire skirmish or until some condition described in the spell is met. Spell Stacking: Different spells that grant bonuses to the same characteristic are usually cumulative. For example, casting magic weapon (touch; attack +1, ignore DR) and bless (your

Number of Uses Most spells can be cast a limited number of times in a skirmish. For many spellcasters, this fact is indicated by a number of check boxes (❑) after the spell’s name, one box for each time the spell can be cast. Special spellcasters, such as sorcerers and bards, instead have a selection of spells they can cast again and again, called “sorcerer spells.” Their stat card instead lists the spells available and a separate series of check boxes for each level of spell they can cast. The caster can use any spell on its stat card, but each casting uses up one check box at the spell’s level. When all the check boxes have been used up at a given level, the spellcaster can’t cast any more spells of that level. (It’s okay to use up a higher-level spell’s box, if there is one available, to cast a lowerlevel spell.) If a spell can be used any number of times, this fact is indicated on the stat card by the phrase “(unlimited uses).”

Range A spell’s range indicates how far from the spellcaster the effect can occur. There are eight standard ranges. In increasing order of range, they are: personal, touch, range 6, cone, line, sight, your warband, and any warband. See the glossary at the end of this chapter for complete descriptions of these types of ranges. There are two cone templates printed in the appendix, representing two ways you can position cone effects. You can photocopy these templates and cut them out.

Radius Some spells affect a roughly circular area on the battle grid. These spells’ descriptions give the radius of their effect. There are two radius templates printed in the appendix. You

pqs LINE OF SIGHT AND AREA EFFECTS Terrain that blocks line of sight blocks area effects, including circles, cones, and lines. A square inside an area effect that has no line of sight to the origin of the effect is not affected by the spell or ability.

pqs

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:45 AM Page 99

Save DC Some spells allow a save to reduce or avoid their effect. This is indicated by a save DC number at the end of the spell’s description. Each creature affected by a spell makes a saving throw.

Troll

SPECIAL ABILITIES

Some creatures have special abilities, such as Breath Weapon, that work much the way spells do. The descriptions of these abilities use a similar format and the same keywords as spell descriptions do. Like a spell, a special ability with a range can target either the nearest enemy or the nearest ally. Many special abilities allow a creature to use them anytime during its turn, and the use doesn’t prevent that creature from being able to attack during that turn. If using a special ability replaces a creature’s attack, this fact is noted in the ability’s description. Like attacks, special abilities that specify they replace a creature’s attack can be used only on that creature’s turn. The glossary at the end of this chapter provides information about many special abilities.

Illus. by D. Hanley

This section of a spell description details the spell’s effect on the target and creatures in its area, if applicable. A few of the most common spell effects and keywords are discussed here. Others are explained in more detail in the glossary at the end of this chapter. Spells that Don’t Affect Specific Types of Creatures: Some spells don’t work against certain creature types. If the nearest target happens to be a creature your spell can’t affect, choose another spell or move the caster to a location where you can target the right creature type. For example, the Hell Hound has the Immune Fire special ability, so the Elf Pyromancer ‘s lesser fire orb spell has no effect on it. If the Hell Hound is the nearest enemy to the Pyromancer, the Pyromancer can’t simply choose to ignore it and cast the spell on a different enemy. In order to cast lesser fire orb with any effect, the Pyromancer has to move so that some creature other than the Hell Hound is the nearest enemy. Spells that Grant Bonuses: Bonuses that are simple additions to a creature’s statistics use a “+” sign. For example, bear’s endurance (touch; target living creature gains +10 hp) increases the target’s hit points by 10. Similarly, magic weapon (touch; attack +1, ignore DR) increases a creature’s melee attack rolls and ranged attack rolls by 1. Gains: When a spell gives a creature a new special ability, or the effect is more complicated than a simple addition to a statistic, the description uses the word “gains.” For example, blur (touch; target creature gains Conceal 6) grants its target the Conceal 6 special ability. Hit Points: Spells that remove damage from wounded creatures or increase a creature’s hit points use the expression “hp.” Spells that Deal Damage: Many spells deal damage to enemy creatures (or yours, if they’re unlucky enough to be caught in the effect or you’re crazy enough to blast your own creatures). Such spells use the word “damage.” Damage-dealing spells may also allow the target to make a save to reduce their effect (see Save DC, below).

CHAPTER 5:

Effects and Conditions

Roll 1d20 and add the affected creature’s level to the result. If the result is equal to or greater than the given Difficulty Class, the save is successful. You don’t add a Commander rating to the result unless it’s a morale save. The save DC for a spell is usually 12 + the spell’s level. Damage-Dealing Spells: If a creature makes its save against a damage-dealing spell, the spell deals only half damage to the target, rounded down to the nearest multiple of 5. A successful save against a spell that deals 5 points of damage means the creature takes no damage instead. Other Effects: Unless the spell description specifies otherwise, a creature avoids all effects of a spell by making a successful save against it.

SKIRMISH RULES

can photocopy these templates and cut them out to help position a spell’s effect. Place the target of the spell inside the 4square-wide cutout center of the template. If the target creature occupies 1 square, you can arrange the template any way you like around the target, so long as it is inside the center and the squares of the template align with those on the battle grid. If the target is a Large creature, position it completely inside the center of the template. Radius 2: These spells affect all creatures within a 2-square radius. Radius 4: These powerful spells affect all creatures within a 4square radius.

TERRAIN

The D&D Miniatures Entry Pack contains six feature tiles that add several different types of terrain to the battle grid. (These terrain tiles are reproduced at the back of this book.) Some terrain slows or blocks movement, or provides obstacles and cover. Other terrain has special game effects. You might be able to obtain different terrain tiles from other sources, or even make your own full-scale tactical maps that have a variety of terrain types.

TERRAIN TYPES Described below are the terrain types that appear in the appendix of this book. You can photocopy these pages and cut them out to make terrain tiles.

99

SKIRMISH RULES Illus. by A. Smith

CHAPTER 5:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 10:45 AM Page 100

Undead love to fight on blood rock.

Blood Rock Any creature on blood rock scores a critical hit when its melee attack roll is a natural 19 or 20. The attack automatically hits no matter how high the defender’s Armor Class, even if the defender is immune to double damage from critical hits. Ranged attacks are not affected by this terrain tile. Blood rock is found on the Abattoir terrain tile. Other terrain tiles may have sections of blood rock rather than being entirely covered by this terrain type.

Difficult Terrain Difficult terrain slows movement, preventing attackers from charging. Each square of difficult terrain costs 2 squares to move into (3 squares if it’s a diagonal move). The terrain tiles in the appendix contain several different types of difficult terrain, each with identical game effects, including piles of ancient armor, damaged statues, and broken ground. You can identify difficult terrain by its icon (a light-colored triangle). Difficult terrain always covers all or most of a square. Small objects in a square, such as scattered coins or bones, don’t count as difficult terrain. Difficult terrain is found on several terrain tiles.

Sacred Circle

100

A creature on any square containing a sacred circle gains a +2 bonus on attack rolls. (Candles have no game effect.) These attacks deal magic damage, which overcomes Damage Reduction (see the glossary at the end of this chapter for more information). Sacred circles have no effect on movement. A sacred circle is found on the Shrine terrain tile.

Statues Statues hinder movement. It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing a statue (or 3 squares if moving diagonally). A creature can’t end its movement in a square containing a statue. Statues provide cover to creatures, which makes them harder to hit, but those creatures can still be seen. Statues are found on various terrain tiles. Not all statues look the same; most are gray stone, but some are golden. All are mounted on a square base.

Walls Walls and solid stone block movement and line of sight. You can’t move or make a ranged attack through a wall. You also can’t move diagonally past a corner or the end of a wall. Count around walls to see if commanders are close enough to influence the creatures in their warband. (See the diagram labeled Walls and Distance.) Walls are found on every terrain tile provided in this book.

OTHER TERRAIN TYPES Here are some ideas for unusual terrain. You can use these terrain types to design battle grids or terrain tiles for yourself. Some of these terrain types have big effects on skirmishes, which aren’t always obvious until the terrain is in play. Use the more unusual terrain types sparingly, at least until you have some experience with them.

Arrow Slit An arrow slit is a narrow opening in a wall that an archer can shoot through. Use a thin wall (running along a gridline) and

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:04 AM Page 101

place the arrow slit at an intersection on the battle grid. A creature can use that intersection to aim a ranged attack (because line of sight for ranged attacks is drawn from a corner). Since the arrow slit is so small, a creature adjacent to it gets a +8 bonus to Armor Class for cover instead of +4, and a creature can’t trace line of sight through the arrow slit unless it is adjacent to it. It’s not possible to make a melee attack through an arrow slit.

Diagonal Wall

In the ruins and dungeons where skirmishes take place, some statues have lingering magical auras. These statues affect movement and provide cover like normal statues, but they have additional magical effects. (For more details on magic statues, see the Magic Statues scenario, below.)

CHAPTER 5:

Magic Statue

SKIRMISH RULES

When creating a diagonal wall, don’t draw through intersections on the battle grid. Cutting through intersections diagonally creates half-squares that don’t work too well in play. Instead, draw the diagonal through points halfway along adjoining sides of the square. Squares that have a corner cut off by a diagonal wall count as normal squares. The corners that get cut off don’t count as squares.

If a low obstacle occupies one or more squares, such as an altar, treat those squares as difficult terrain. If it’s narrow, such as a low wall running along a gridline, then crossing it costs 1 additional square of movement. As with normal walls, a low wall can be thin (running along a gridline) or thick (filling up whole squares). A Large creature may end its movement on a narrow obstacle; for example, it can straddle a low, thin wall. If a creature is completely on a low obstacle, it gains a +1 bonus on melee attack rolls for being on higher ground. If a Large creature is partially on a low obstacle (such as the narrow wall in the example above), it gains no benefit for being so positioned.

Entangling Vines Thick vines creep across the ground, wrapping themselves around any creatures that stumble into them. The vines produce an area of difficult terrain that also has an Entangle effect (save DC 13).

Grease

Hallowed Sanctum A hallowed sanctum usually has a statue or altar to a good deity in the center. Good creatures gain a +1 bonus on attack rolls and saves while in a hallowed sanctum.

Healing Stone Embedded in the stone floor is a gem that heals wounds. Any wounded living creature that ends its turn on a square containing a healing stone heals 5 hit points. A healing stone has a healing capacity of 20 total hit points. Once that’s used up, it can’t heal any more damage until the next skirmish.

Illusory Terrain When first viewed from a distance, this tile displays terrain that is an illusion. This illusory terrain affects line of sight normally but not line of effect. You can’t see through it or target creatures through it, but the illusory terrain won’t stop area effects such as burning hands. Once a creature steps onto the tile, all the terrain disappears (the creature has seen through the illusion, dispelling it for all other viewers as well).

Low Obstacle Low walls, altars, and similar objects are collectively referred to as low obstacles. These terrain types provide cover, but they don’t block line of sight. They provide cover only to creatures within 6 squares of the obstacle, and an attacker can deny the defender’s bonus for cover if the attacker is closer to the obstacle than the defender is.

You can create corridors that are only 1 square wide instead of 2 squares wide. Large creatures have to squeeze through such spaces, so this type of terrain makes them less powerful. You can even make corridors that are narrower than 1 square wide. In this case, Small creatures can move through them normally, but Medium creatures have to squeeze, and Large creatures can’t get through at all.

Narrow Doorway You can make 1-square wide doorways in walls. Large creatures have to squeeze to get through them. You can even make doorways that are narrower than 1 square. Small creatures pass through them normally, Medium creatures spend 1 additional square of movement to pass through, Werewolf and Large creatures can’t fit through.

Illus. by S. Tappin

A slick, magical substance covers the ground, making creatures slip and fall. The area of grease counts as difficult terrain. In addition, every time a creature enters a square or squares containing grease, it must succeed on a DC 13 save or stop moving.

Narrow Corridor

Pit A creature that ends its movement on a pit square falls into the pit and is destroyed. Slow creatures can’t jump over pits. Reasonably fast creatures can jump over narrow pits but not wide ones. Truly fast creatures can jump over even wide pits. A creature with a speed of 5 or more can move onto a pit square but then must be able to move immediately onto a square that does not contain a pit; it can’t stop on the pit square itself (or else it falls into the pit and is destroyed). A creature with a speed of 10 or more can move onto two pit squares in a row during a single move but not onto a third. Creatures that are moving over a pit can’t change direction in “mid-jump.” When moving off a pit square, a creature must move to a square that’s farther away from the last square it was on that does not contain a pit. Creatures without the Flight special ability that get moved onto a pit square by an effect such as Slide or Push/Pull (see the glossary at the end of this chapter) can make a DC 20 save if they are adjacent to a square in which they could legally end movement (and the square does not contain a pit). If the save succeeds, move the creature to that square. Failure destroys the creature. (Creatures with Flight that get moved onto a pit square by such an effect must move off on their next turn.)

101

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:05 AM Page 102

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

Shadow Here and there linger the magical remnants of previous battles and fortresses. Some areas are perpetually shrouded in magical darkness, while walls of pure shadow yet stand in others. A square that’s filled with shadow blocks line of sight but not line of effect. You can’t see through it or target creatures through it, but the shadow won’t stop area effects such as burning hands. A creature that’s completely in an area of shadow is blinded, which slows it down in addition to other effects (see the Blinded entry in the glossary at the end of this chapter), and other creatures can’t see it. A thin wall of shadow (one running along a gridline) doesn’t affect movement, but it does block line of sight.

Spike Stones Magical battles twist the fabric of nature as easily as they blast warriors into fiery fragments. Lesser warriors should avoid such areas or risk perishing before even finding their enemies. A square filled with spike stones counts as difficult terrain. In addition, every time a creature enters a square or squares containing spike stones, it takes 5 points of magic damage.

Stairs

Illus. by S. Tappin

Stairs can be freestanding (perhaps part of a ruined structure) or can connect areas of different elevation. Stairs affect movement as difficult terrain when a creature is ascending. A creature on higher ground than its enemy gains a +1 bonus on melee attack rolls.

Teleporter Teleporters usually come in pairs. A teleporter is a square that immediately transfers a creature to another square (usually the other teleporter in the pair). A creature that moves onto one teleporter instantly appears on the other, and it can then continue moving. A teleporter does not transport a creature if the corresponding teleporter square is occupied. A teleporter does not transport a Large creature if there’s no legal way for it to occupy the corresponding teleporter’s space.

Wraith

Teleporters transport flying and incorporeal creatures normally. Being teleported does not provoke attacks of opportunity. You can also use one-way teleporters or even random teleporters, which transport to any other teleporter space or even to a random spot on the battle grid. A teleporter can never transport a creature to a space it could normally not occupy. See the Teleporter Statues scenario, below, for rules on teleporter statues.

Trap When a creature moves onto a square containing a trap, roll 1d20. On a roll of 11 or higher, the trap is triggered, and the creature must make a DC 15 save. If the save is successful, the creature evades the trap. If the save fails, the trap deals 10 points of damage to the creature, typically from a scything blade or spring-loaded arrows. A trap has no further effect once it has been triggered. A given creature has only one chance to trigger a trap during its turn. You can’t send your Kobold Warrior back and forth over a trap trying to get the trap to go off (or at least, not more than once per turn). Incorporeal, burrowing, and flying creatures do not trigger most traps, though a specific trap could be designed to affect burrowing or flying creatures. You can also create specialized traps that deal fire damage, produce a Poison or Paralysis effect, and so on.

Unhallowed Sanctum An unhallowed sanctum usually has a statue or altar to an evil deity in the center. Evil creatures gain a +1 bonus on attack rolls and saves while in an unhallowed sanctum.

Wall of Force Like a shadow wall, a wall of force is likely the remnant of some previous magical battle or defense. You can see through a wall of force but not move through one. A wall of force is thin, running along a gridline, not thick like a 1-square-deep stone wall. It blocks line of effect for ranged attacks (including spells, breath weapons, and the like), but it does not block line of sight. A wall of force blocks movement— even for incorporeal creatures. It is a ranged warband’s worst nightmare, because the nearest enemy in line of sight can be completely protected behind the wall of force.

SCENARIOS AND VARIANTS

The Standard scenario (detailed below) sets out the basic rules for setting up and fighting a skirmish battle. For variety, this section shows you several other types of skirmish scenarios. Basic Scenarios: These scenarios have different victory conditions, special rules, or both. Warband-Building Scenarios: In these scenarios, one player or all players alter their warbands in some way. In general, the process goes like this: First, the players decide how many points each warband should have (the default is 100 points), then all players design their warbands. Next, the players choose a scenario and set up the battle. Instead of choosing a scenario, you can roll randomly to determine which one you play. Since different scenarios favor different warbands, rolling randomly for scenarios can be more fair than choosing them.

102

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:05 AM Page 103

RANDOM SCENARIOS If you want to play a random scenario but not one that requires altering your warband, roll on Table 5–4: Random Basic Scenarios. Each scenario is described in detail following the table.

Table 5–4: Random Basic Scenarios

12–16

12–15

17–21

16–20

22–24 25–27

21–25 26–28

28–30 31–33 34–36

29–31 — 32–34

37–39 40–42

— 35–37

43–45 46–50

38–40 41–45

51–60

46–60

61–64 65–69

61–64 65–69

70–73 74–76 77–78 79–83

70–73 74–76 77–79 —

84–86

80–84

87–90

85–89

91–93 94–96

90–92 93–96

97–98 99–100

97–98 99–100

Scenario Standard. Score 100 pts. Boar Hunt. Vie to bring down a dire boar. Chambers of Dread. Attacks deal more damage, and attack rolls of 20 are lethal. Contested Ground. Fight for control of the center. Eternal Battle. Eliminated creatures return to fight again. Halls of Decay. Wounded creatures lose hp. Life Force. Creatures reduced to 0 or –5 hp might survive. Magic Statues. Statues grant boons1. Marked for Death. Kill two enemy creatures. Misty Ruins. Line of sight limited to 6 squares, scattered deployment2. Moral Victory. Scenario depends on factions. Plunder Run. Search the treasure room for magic items. Prowling Marauder. Owlbear on the loose. Quick Boon. First warband to 20 pts. scores +20 pts. Quick Strike. Win at 70 pts. (or one enemy creature left). Random Terrain. Place terrain randomly. Reconnaissance in Force. Score points for getting off the battle grid3. Restless Dead. Zombies run amok. Shattered Ruins. Lots of rubble. Sparse Ruins. Fewer terrain tiles. Split Warbands. Two warbands in four corners. Statue Race. Players race to receive a boon from each statue on the battle grid. Stragglers. Each player deploys 1d20 points of creatures/round. Teleporter Statues. Use statues to teleport4. Tide of Battle. Leading warband wins initiative. Vampiric Catacombs. Killers get stronger. Warlord’s Tomb. Summon a wraith.

1 Reroll if there are no statues among the terrain tiles. 2 Maximum of one player per two terrain tiles. 3 Reroll if number of players is other than two or four. 4 Reroll if there is only one statue among the terrain tiles.

CHAPTER 5:

Multiplayer d% 01–05 06–08 09–11

SKIRMISH RULES

2-player d% 01–05 06–08 09–11

Victory: Each creature is worth its cost in victory points to the player who eliminates it. Eliminating a creature can mean destroying it with your creatures or causing it to rout off the battle grid. You win when you have scored victory points equal to the cost of your own warband, or when all your opponents’ creatures are eliminated. Eliminating Your Own Creatures: Creatures may not make melee attacks or ranged attacks against allies. If you eliminate one of your own creatures (by using a spell or special ability that affects an area), or if one of your creatures is eliminated through no action of an enemy (such as a creature routing off the battle grid because of the Cowardly ability), your opponents split the victory points for that creature, rounding down. (In a two-player battle, your opponent would receive all the victory points.) Tie-Breaker: If no creature has made an attack roll or saving throw for 5 consecutive rounds, the winner is the player with the most points from eliminating enemy creatures. If players are still tied, the winner is the player who has a creature closest to the center of the battle grid. (In the unlikely case that players are still tied, the player who controls the creature with the highest cost is the winner.)

Boar Hunt The gods sometimes test their followers, conferring favor on those that excel. In this case, they have released three dire boars into the ruins. Warbands that draw the beasts’ blood gain divine favor. Special Rule—Divine Boar: Place a Dire Boar in the center of the battle grid after terrain has been set up. This Dire Boar (and others that follow it) has the Fearless special ability in addition to its normal abilities. At the end of each round, after all other creatures have been activated, players roll dice. The winner activates the Dire Boar at that time as if the Boar were a member of his or her warband. At the end of a round in which the first or second divine Dire Boar has been eliminated, and after all other creatures have been activated, randomly choose a terrain tile on the battle grid. The player with the fewest victory points places a new Dire Boar on that terrain tile. Then determine which player controls during the current round by rolling dice as normal, with the winner activating the newly arrived Dire Boar immediately. The battle ends when the third Dire Boar is eliminated. Victory: Each player earns victory points equal to the points of damage his or her creatures dealt to all three of the Dire Boars. Damage in excess of that needed to destroy the Boar does not count. A player also earns the Dire Boar’s cost in victory points (23) if his or her creature destroys the Boar. A player loses points for healing the Boar, equal to the number of hit points of healing granted. Players score no victory points for killing enemy creatures, but they may find it expedient to do so anyway. Variant: If players agree beforehand, use any dire animal miniature that costs at least 20 points instead of the Dire Boar.

Standard Scenario Use these rules unless a variant scenario you are using specifies otherwise. Number of Players: Any. Warbands: The default warband size is 100 points, although warbands of 50 or 200 points also make for fun battles. In a 100point warband, no creature can cost more than 70 points (or more than 30 points in a 50-point game, or more than 140 points in a 200-point game). Terrain Setup: As described under Setup at the start of this chapter.

Chambers of Dread Whispers of death and destruction murmur through these ancient ruins. Here, even the mighty can fall to a single sword stroke. Special Rule—Bonus Damage: All creatures deal an additional 5 points of damage on any melee or ranged attack. Special Rule—Instant Kill: Any attack roll that is a natural 20 destroys the target outright. This is true even if the attack couldn’t normally deal damage to the defender (for instance, because of Damage Reduction or an attack that is negated by the Conceal special ability).

103

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:05 AM Page 104

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

Contested Ground In this scenario, warbands vie to hold a strategically important piece of terrain. Victory: The first feature tile placed on the battle grid must cover the center of the battle grid. (You can arrange this terrain tile any way you like, as long as it covers the center square and is legally placed.) Beginning on the fifth round, victory goes to the first player who both begins and ends a round as the only player whose creatures occupy that central terrain tile. The creatures that end the round on the terrain tile don’t have to be the same creatures that started the round there. You still win even if enemy creatures occupy the terrain tile during the round, so long as they’re gone at the end of the round.

Eternal Battle The whims of the gods sometimes sweep mortal warriors into battles in which they fight, die, and rise to fight again. In this scenario (casually known as “Death-o-Rama”), eliminated creatures return to play on the next round at a random location. Special Rule—Resurrection: Creatures eliminated from the battle score points for the player who eliminated them, then return to the battle grid at the start of the next round. Before a new round begins, each creature eliminated in the previous round returns to play. If more than one player has creatures that are due to be resurrected at the start of a round, the player with the highest victory point total resurrects creatures first, followed by the player with the second highest total, and so on. If there is a tie for victory points, randomly determine who resurrects creatures first. To resurrect a creature, randomly pick a terrain tile. Then place your creature on that terrain tile. You may be able to place your creature adjacent to one or more enemies. If the chosen terrain tile does not have enough room for your creature, randomly pick a different tile. Routing: Routing creatures are resurrected at the start of the round after they exit the battle grid. Special Abilities and Spells: Resurrected creatures reenter play with all the special abilities, spells, and statistics on their stat cards (or otherwise possessed, in the case of a campaign). They lose any benefits previously granted by spells (except for those with a range of “your warband” or “any warband”). Victory: Victory goes to the first player to eliminate 150 points of enemy creatures. If your warbands aren’t built with 100 points, victory goes to the player who eliminates enemy creatures worth 150% of his or her own warband’s cost.

Halls of Decay In these malignant ruins, life and hope slip away. Even golems and undead are subject to the pull of decay. Special Rule—Decay: At the start of each round, roll 1d20 for each wounded creature. On a roll of 11 or higher, the creature immediately takes 5 points of damage. Victory points for creatures eliminated by this damage are split up among opponents, as usual.

Life Force Just as some ruins are permeated by malignant energy, others sustain and protect those within. Special Rule—Resilience: When a creature is reduced to 0 or –5 hit points, roll 1d20. On a roll of 11 or higher, the creature instead survives and now has 5 hit points. Creatures reduced to –10 hit points or below are destroyed, as usual.

104

Magic Statues The statues in the dungeon grant magical gifts to creatures that invoke their powers. Special Rule—Statue Gifts: Each statue on the battle grid can bestow a magical gift on a single creature from each competing warband. No warband has access to a statue’s power until it has eliminated at least one enemy creature. Once your warband has access to a statue’s power, any creature that does not have the Difficult 20 ability can attempt to invoke the power of a statue that has not yet given your warband a gift. To receive a statue’s gift, a creature must be adjacent to that statue, take a standard action (replacing its attacks) to invoke the statue’s powers, and succeed on a DC 13 save. (A creature that ends its turn adjacent to more than one magic statue chooses only one.) Failure has no effect unless you roll a natural 1, in which case the creature takes 5 points of damage. If the save succeeds, roll on the table below for a random gift. Any bonus bestowed affects that creature for the rest of the skirmish. Your warband can receive only one gift from any given statue. However, the same statue can still grant a gift to each opposing warband. Different warbands are likely to get different gifts from the same statue.

Magic Statue Gifts 1d20 1 2–3 4–5 6–15 16–18 19–20

Statue Effect Heal all damage (reroll if not wounded) Speed +2 AC +2 Attack +2 Melee and ranged damage +5 Faction-specific gift (see below)

Faction-Specific Gifts On this result, the creature gets a powerful gift that depends on the faction of its warband, as follows. LG: AC +4. CG: Speed +4; Tactics. Activating this creature doesn’t count against your limit of two creatures per phase. Thus, you can activate another creature during the turn you receive this gift, if you wish. LE: Attack +4. CE: Melee and ranged damage +10.

Marked for Death This scenario hinges on eliminating key members of the opposition. Victory: Before starting play, both players line up their warbands where they can be seen. Both of you secretly write down the name of a creature in your warband and one in your opponent’s warband. Then you simultaneously reveal the names of the creatures you have chosen. To win, you must eliminate both the enemy creature you chose and the enemy creature your opponent chose. If you both chose the same creature, you only have to eliminate that creature to win. If your warband has multiple miniatures of a creature that’s “marked for death,” you must indicate which one of them you chose. If you and your opponent both name the same kind of creature, only the one you specified is marked for death. For example, if you have two Half-Orc Assassins in your warband, and you and your opponent each choose “Half-Orc Assassin,” then you have to specify which one of them is marked, and the one to be eliminated is known to both of you throughout the skirmish.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:05 AM Page 105

Misty Ruins

The way warbands fight each other depends on their alignments. Special Rule—Concession (Good against Good): When two good warbands fight, combatants concede when they are injured rather than fighting to the death. Any creature that drops to half its hit points or lower retreats (retreating works exactly like routing, except that creatures with the Fearless ability retreat too). Retreating enemies do not provoke attacks of opportunity, and retreating creatures can’t rally—they just hustle out of the way and off the battle grid. Creatures with the Difficult 20 ability, however, can’t retreat. They can still rout normally, though, and commanders can rally them. Victory: Use the rules for the Standard scenario, with the following modifications depending on the alignments of the competing warbands. Good against Good: Each player scores full victory points for enemy creatures that his or her creatures force to retreat or rout off the battle grid. However, destroyed enemies are worth only half their cost in victory points. The exception is creatures with the Difficult 20 special ability. Since they don’t retreat, there’s no disgrace in killing them, and they are worth full victory points. Good against Evil: Use the rules for the Standard scenario, with no adjustment to point value. Both sides are out for blood. Evil against Evil: You win by eliminating all enemy commanders. The commanders of each warband are just as happy to conquer and enslave the enemy warband as to massacre it. If two or more warbands’ commanders are eliminated simultaneously, determine the winner as in the Standard scenario.

Plunder Run Loot the treasure room in the center of the dungeon before your enemies find all the good stuff. Setup: Each player starts with one fewer feature tile than he or she would ordinarily have. Before rolling for terrain initiative, set up two Treasure Room tiles in the center of the battle grid. Place them adjacent to each other in the exact center of the board, lengthwise, so that the doorway on the long side of each tile matches the long-side doorway on the other tile.

Prowling Marauder A rampaging owlbear is a boon to the lucky commander and ruin to others. Special Rule—Owlbear Marauder: Place an Owlbear in the center of the battle grid after terrain has been set up. At the end of each round, after all other creatures have been activated, players roll dice. The winner activates the Owlbear at that time as if the Owlbear were a member of his or her warband. If the Owlbear routs, it heads for a random exit corner. Victory: Use the rules for the Standard scenario. Points for creatures eliminated by the Owlbear are split up among opponents, as normal. Eliminating the Owlbear scores no points. Variants: If players agree beforehand, use any high-cost Animal or Magical Beast with Difficult 20 instead of an Owlbear. For more fun, especially in multiplayer battles, use two or more marauders. The player who rolls highest in the first set of rolls picks one marauding creature and activates it before players roll dice for the next, and so on.

CHAPTER 5:

Moral Victory

Special Rule—Treasure: Any Humanoid or Monstrous Humanoid creature, or any commander, on a Treasure Room tile can search for a treasure by forgoing its attacks during its turn. Roll 1d20: On an unmodified roll of 16 or higher, the creature has found a magic item. Roll on Table 5–6: Random Magic Items to determine the treasure. That creature possesses the magic item for the rest of the battle but cannot give it to other members of its warband. (In campaigns, magic items gained from the Treasure Room go away at the end of the battle.)

SKIRMISH RULES

Preternatural fog blankets the dungeon. Enemies stumble halfway through each other’s patrols before recognizing the danger. Setup: Warbands do not set up as usual on their assembly tiles but instead in smaller groups scattered on random terrain tiles. In a two-player battle, each player places one-third of his or her warband at a time in 3 rounds of deployment (round fractions down until the final round). In a three- or four-player battle, each places one-half of his or her warband at a time in 2 rounds of deployment. During a player’s deployment round, he or she selects the appropriate number of creatures and then randomly selects a terrain tile that does not already contain miniatures. The creatures are placed on that terrain tile. Routing creatures still must move toward the exit corner of their warband’s assembly tile. Special Rule—Fog: Line of sight is limited to 6 squares. (Creatures with Blindsight can see normally.) Line of effect, however, extends through the fog normally. For example, a wizard can’t target a creature 7 squares away with a lightning bolt, but the spell’s effect still extends to the full 12 squares. Special Rule—Scouts and Wandering Monsters: Ignore these special abilities during deployment.

Quick Boon This scenario rewards the warband that strikes quickly. Victory: Use the rules for the Standard scenario, but the first player to score 20 victory points immediately gets 20 additional victory points.

Quick Strike This scenario rewards early success, benefiting players who fight hard instead of hanging back. Victory: If you are playing with 100-point warbands, you win by eliminating enemy creatures whose total cost is 70 points or more. If you aren’t playing with 100-point warbands, you win when you have eliminated enemies whose total cost is equal to 70% of your warband’s point cost. For example, if your warband is worth 80 points and your opponent’s is worth 110, you win if you eliminate 56 points’ worth of creatures, while your opponent has to eliminate 77 points’ worth of creatures. Regardless of the total cost of the warbands in this scenario, you win immediately if each of your opponents has no more than one creature left on the battlefield.

Random Terrain Sometimes warbands can’t choose where to fight. Setup: After placing assembly tiles, turn the rest of all the players’ terrain tiles face down, mix them up, and spread them more or less evenly across the battle grid. Keep a 2-square gap between any two terrain tiles and between tiles and the edges of the battle grid. (Leave out tiles that don’t fit.) Then turn them all face up to discover the battlefield you’re fighting for.

Reconnaissance in Force You don’t always have to kill your enemies to win. This scenario also rewards conservation of your forces.

105

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:06 AM Page 106

Victory: You win when you have scored victory points equal to the cost of your own warband. You score victory points both for the cost of enemies you eliminate and for the cost of your own creatures that move off the battle grid through the exit squares directly opposite your entry corner.

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

Restless Dead Sometimes the dead are not content to wait for you to join them. Special Rule—Roaming Zombies: After setting up terrain and before placing creatures, place one Zombie on each feature tile. Treat all these Zombies as Difficult, but with no rating (that is, they can never be put under command). Any player may activate any of these roaming Zombies as if it were a member of his or her own warband. No roaming Zombie can be activated twice in a round, but different players can activate the same roaming Zombie in successive rounds. Roaming Zombies always treat one another as allies; they rush and attack only the nearest creature controlled by a player other than the one activating them. Turned roaming Zombies rout toward the nearest exit corner. They can’t be rallied, since they’re always out of command. Victory: Points for creatures eliminated by roaming Zombies are split up among opponents, as normal. Eliminating roaming Zombies scores no points. Variant: Instead of using Zombies from the Harbinger set, use Troglodyte Zombies (from the same set) or more powerful zombies of your own design or from other sets. It’s easiest to use identical creatures, but if players agree, you can mix and match.

Shattered Ruins The past glory of the dungeon has been reduced to rubble, which now litters the place. Archers prefer to stage their ambushes here, where enemies are slow to close the distance. Setup: All squares on the battle grid that aren’t part of a terrain tile are considered to be difficult terrain.

Sparse Ruins Dungeons and catacombs are sometimes less densely built up than normal. Terrain Setup: In a two-player skirmish (or a four-player skirmish on a double-size battle grid), each player places only two feature tiles (in addition to the assembly tile) instead of three. In a skirmish with three players or with five or more players, each player places only a single feature tile instead of two.

Split Warbands The warbands have become split up in the dungeon. They meet in battle as they reassemble. Setup: Each player places two assembly tiles and two feature tiles (instead of one assembly tile and three feature tiles). Your two assembly tiles are in opposite corners. Warbands: Each player divides his or her warband into two groups, splitting the creatures up as evenly as possible. One half of the warband sets up on one assembly tile and the other half on the other assembly tile. In all other respects, treat the two groups as a single warband.

Statue Race

106

Warbands race to receive magical gifts from the statues in the dungeon. Setup: Each player that does not have a Statue Room among his or her feature tiles may swap a Statue Room in for another tile. Special Rule—Statue Gifts: Use the rules for Statue Gifts from the Magic Statues scenario earlier in this section.

Victory: If one warband has received a gift from all statues before 10 rounds have passed, that warband wins immediately. Otherwise, at the end of 10 rounds, the warband whose creatures received gifts from the most statues is the winner. If players are tied, use the tiebreaker rules from the Standard scenario.

Stragglers The warbands are scattered through the ruins. Individual members, called by the sound of battle, straggle in one at a time, hoping that they can keep the enemy from seizing the objective. Setup: The skirmish starts with no creatures deployed. In addition, the first feature tile placed must cover the center of the battle grid. It can be oriented in any legal position as long as it covers the center square. Special Rule—Stragglers: At the beginning of each round, before rolling for initiative, one player rolls 1d20. The result of that roll is the number of points of creatures (stragglers) that each player can bring in during the upcoming round. After seeing the result, players secretly determine which of their creatures they plan to bring in this round. Then they reveal the creatures simultaneously. Starting with the player who has the highest current victory point total, each player places his or her stragglers on that warband’s assembly tile. If there is no room for a creature on the assembly tile, the creature can’t be placed. Its points accumulate for use on future rounds, as described below. You can’t stall. If you don’t spend all your points on bringing in creatures, you must apply them toward one other creature in the warband. If you start a round with points already applied to a creature, you must continue to spend points exclusively on that creature until it joins the battle. For example, if you roll 12 on the first round, you can bring in an 8-point creature and spend the next 4 points on a 23-point creature. The next 19 points you gain must all be spent on the 23-point creature. After all players have placed their newly arriving creatures, roll for initiative and complete the rest of the round normally. As normal for creatures that enter the battle during play, spells that target “your warband” or “any warband” affect them even if the spells were cast before they arrive. Victory: Beginning on the fifth round, victory goes to the first player who both begins and ends a round as the only player whose creatures occupy the central terrain tile. The creatures that end the round on the terrain tile don’t have to be the same creatures that started the round there. You still win even if enemy creatures occupy the terrain tile during the round, so long as they’re gone at the end of the round.

Teleporter Statues Magic statues in the dungeon let combatants teleport from place to place. Setup: There must be at least two statues on the battle grid. Each player that does not have a Statue Room among his or her feature tiles may swap a Statue Room in for another tile. Special Rule—Teleporter Statues: Statues on the battle grid act as teleporters accessible to all warbands, beginning at the start of the second round. Unlike in the Magic Statues scenario, a warband does not need to eliminate an enemy to use the statues, nor does a creature need to succeed on a save. There is no limit to how many times a given warband can use a teleporter statue. As a move action, once per turn a creature that is under command and adjacent to a teleporter statue can move instantly to a legal position adjacent to any other statue. This movement does not provoke attacks of opportunity. A creature that starts

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:06 AM Page 107

its turn adjacent to a statue could teleport to a new space and then attack, cast a spell, or move again. A creature that moves to a square adjacent to a statue could then teleport, but that would end its turn. An incorporeal or flying creature can teleport to a space that’s illegal to stop in, provided it can then move to a legal space on the same turn.

Tide of Battle

Among the tombs of the undead, power flows from those who die to those who kill. Special Rule—Vampiric Boon: The first time a creature destroys an enemy creature, it gains a +1 bonus on all attack rolls and saves and a +5 bonus on damage rolls for melee attacks and ranged attacks for the rest of the skirmish. Killing additional creatures provides no further benefit.

2-player d% 01–20

21–25 26–30 31–40 41–50 51–60 61–70 71–80 81–90

Warlord’s Tomb A warband with unmolested access to the tomb of a mighty warlord can summon the warlord’s spirit to fight with it. Terrain Setup: In addition to normal terrain, place a Shrine tile in the center of the battle grid. (Roll dice to see which player places it.) Special Rule—Haunted Tomb: Starting on the second round of the battle, a Wraith joins the warband of the first player who both begins and ends a round as the only player whose creatures occupy the Shrine tile. The creature that ends the round on the terrain tile doesn’t have to be the same creature that started the round there. You still get the Wraith even if enemy creatures occupy the terrain tile during the round, so long as they’re gone at the end of the round. The Wraith joins your warband even if your faction isn’t Lawful Evil. Starting on the following round, you activate it as a normal member of your warband. Victory: Use the rules for the Standard scenario. However, the Wraith does not score points for the player who eliminates it, nor does it increase the number of points a player needs to win.

WARBAND-BUILDING SCENARIOS The following scenarios call on one or both players to adjust their warbands or even create new ones from scratch. They take more preparation than basic scenarios, and they’re not perfect for campaign play. However, they’re great for players who want to challenge themselves and one another strategically.

91–100

Multiplayer d% Scenario 01–20 Out of the Box. Open an Expansion Pack and play that as your warband using the Standard scenario. 21–30 Design Challenge. Random warband size and creature restrictions. 31–45 Divine Guardians. Gain 40 pts. of outsiders and heroes. 46–60 Double Battle. Double-strength warbands. 61–75 Four by Four. Four skirmishes with four different warbands. — Lethal Attrition. 100-pt. warband against two 60-pt. warbands. 76–90 Reinforcements. 50 extra pts. of creatures join the battle underway. — Strike Team. 75-pt. warband built from scratch against 100-pt. warband. 91–100 Three-Part Mayhem. Three skirmishes, with 50-pt., 100-pt., and 200-pt. warbands. — Twin Gauntlet. Get runners through the battlefield.

CHAPTER 5:

Vampiric Catacombs

Table 5–5: Random Warband-Building Scenarios

SKIRMISH RULES

In this scenario, the warband that is winning the skirmish uses its impetus to even greater advantage. Special Rule—Impetus: Whichever warband has scored the most victory points automatically wins initiative. If players are tied in victory points (such as at the beginning of a skirmish), the tied players roll for initiative normally.

Choose one of the scenarios listed in Table 5–5: Random Warband-Building Scenarios, or roll randomly. Before rolling, all players should have a standard 100-point warband ready. All of these scenarios assume Standard rules unless otherwise specified. Each scenario is described in detail following the table.

Out of the Box When playing with miniatures right out of the box, ignore warband faction restrictions. Just play with whatever you get! Warbands: Each player opens one sealed D&D Miniatures Expansion Pack and plays with all the miniatures inside. There are no warband factions in an Out of the Box scenario. Use the faction of the individual creature for purposes of special abilities such as Smite Evil. If a creature can belong to multiple factions, use the following list. —LG/CG: The creature counts as good but is neither lawful nor chaotic. —LG/LE: The creature counts as lawful but is neither good nor evil. —CG/CE: The creature counts as chaotic but is neither good nor evil. —LE/CE: The creature counts as evil but is neither lawful nor chaotic. —Any: The creature is neither good nor evil, nor is it lawful or chaotic. Victory: As in the Standard scenario, you win when you have scored victory points equal to the cost of your own warband, or when all opponents’ creatures are eliminated. Since players’ creatures will probably add up to different point totals, those with

pqqqqrs SCENARIO-SPECIFIC CREATURES When you invent your own scenarios that depend on specific creatures, you’ll need to define two details. Routing: When a creature routs, it normally heads toward its exit corner. If a scenario includes specific creatures, you need to know where they’ll rout to (if at all). For example, the Zombies in the Restless Dead scenario don’t belong to any warband, so the scenario specifies that they move toward the nearest exit corner.

Points: If a creature is not a regular part of a warband, the scenario needs to specify who gains the points that it scores and who scores the points for eliminating it. For example, the Wraith in the Warlord’s Tomb scenario can join a player’s warband but does not score victory points for the opponent who eliminates it, nor does it affect the number of points needed for its warband to win.

pqqqqrs

107

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:06 AM Page 108

less expensive warbands can win without eliminating all their opponents’ creatures. Alternative Victory Conditions: The victory conditions for the Quick Strike scenario work well for making Out of the Box battles more fair to players who open boxes containing weaker creatures. The scenarios Marked for Death and Eternal Battle also play well as Out of the Box battles. (See those scenario descriptions earlier in this chapter for details.)

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

Design Challenge This scenario highlights challenging rules for warband construction. Different creatures become more or less valuable in your warband, and you have to adjust your warband-building strategies to match the scenario’s random special limits. Warbands: Each player selects a faction. Then one player rolls 1d20 and refers to the table below to randomly determine the number of points in each warband and the maximum or minimum cost of any single creature in any warband. For example, if the result of the roll is 7, then all players create 100-point warbands, and no single creature can cost more than 35 points. If the result is 13, then all players create 50-point warbands, and no single creature can cost less than 8 points. 1d20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Creature Cost (in points) Up to 15 Up to 15 Up to 20 Up to 20 Up to 25 Up to 30 Up to 35 Up to 35 Up to 40 Up to 50 At least 5 At least 5 At least 8 At least 10 At least 15 At least 20 At least 30 At least 30 At least 40 At least 50

Warband Size (in points) 50 100 50 100 100 100 100 200 200 200 50 100 50 100 100 100 100 200 200 200

Divine Guardians The deities and other mighty beings of the Outer Planes send champions to aid the warbands that they favor. Warbands: Each player adds up to 40 points of Outsiders and characters (Unique creatures) to his or her warband. Determine these additional creatures secretly. You are allowed to exceed the normal twelve-creature limit when adding these additional creatures. They count as normal members of the warband and must be able to fight for its faction.

Double Battle

108

For pivotal battles, warlords recruit extra troops and commanders. Warbands: Players double their predesigned warbands so that each now has twice as many of each original creature. (You are allowed to exceed the normal twelve-creature limit.) If a warband contains a Unique creature, instead match it with another creature that costs the same or less (rather than with a twin of itself ). Victory: If you are playing with 200-point warbands (after

doubling), you win by eliminating enemy creatures whose total cost is 140 points or more. If you are playing with warbands that are not 200 points each (after doubling), you win when you have eliminated enemies whose total cost is equal to 70% of your warband’s point cost. For example, if your warband is worth 160 points and your opponent’s is worth 140, you win if you eliminate 112 points’ worth of creatures, while your opponent only has to eliminate 98 points’ worth of creatures. Regardless of the total cost of the warbands in this scenario, you win immediately if each of your opponents has no more than one creature left on the battlefield.

Four by Four Test your mastery of tactics by going into battle with warbands from each of the four factions. Warbands: Each player constructs four 100-point warbands, one from each faction. You won’t play two warbands at the same time, so your warbands can share creatures. (If you have a single Azer Raider miniature, for example, it can belong to both your Lawful Good and Lawful Evil warbands.) Scenario: Roll a random basic scenario on Table 5–4. Each player secretly chooses one warband out of the four to play for that scenario. Finish that battle, then put those warbands aside and roll for a second basic scenario. Each player secretly chooses a second warband from the three that haven’t yet seen action. After the second skirmish, play a third and a fourth the same way, so that each player uses each of his or her warbands once. Victory: The player with the most victories out of the four battles is the winner. If there is a tie, the scenario is a draw.

Lethal Attrition Can one bigger warband survive against two smaller warbands? Warbands: Randomly determine which player designs a new 100-point warband. The other player creates two separate 60-point warbands. These two warbands can be of different factions. Scenario: Randomly determine which of the two 60-point warbands fights in the first skirmish. Play the Standard scenario, except that you win only by eliminating your opponent’s entire warband. Rematch: If the 100-point warband wins (and it should), then play a second Standard scenario using the second 60-point warband against the survivors of the 100-point warband. Paralysis, Stun, and all other temporary effects end when the first skirmish ends (if they are not ended sooner), but effects that normally last until the end of a skirmish, such as Poison, continue until the end of the second skirmish. Victory: The player with the 100-point warband must eliminate both 60-point warbands to win. The player with the 60-point warbands wins by eliminating the 100-point warband.

Reinforcements Partway through the battle, more troops arrive. Warbands: Each player looks at the other players’ preconstructed warbands. Then each secretly constructs a “partial warband” of up to six creatures totaling no more than 50 points. Keep these reinforcements secret until you deploy them. Special Rule—Reinforcements: At the end of each round, roll 1d20 and note the result, adding it to the “reinforcement total.” When that total reaches 50 or higher, all reinforcements deploy at the start of the next round. Starting with the player who has the most victory points and in descending victory point order, each player places reinforcements on his or her own assembly tile. You

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:07 AM Page 109

Owlbear

Three-Part Mayhem As battles become fiercer, warlords call for reinforcements. Warbands: Construct 50-point warbands with up to nine creatures each. Scenario: Fight a random basic scenario determined by rolling on Table 5–4. Rematch: After the first skirmish is over, each player adds creatures to his or her warband to bring it up to 100 points, with up to twelve creatures. Each player may drop one creature from his or her original 50-point warband to remove a weak link or make room for other creatures, but the rest of the original warband has to be in the second warband as well. Fight a second random basic scenario, then build your warbands up to 200 points each (maximum of eighteen creatures). Again, you can drop a single creature from your 100-point warband before adding new creatures. Play a third random basic scenario with your 200-point warbands. Victory: Whoever wins two out of three contests is the winner. If no one wins two skirmishes, the scenario ends in a draw.

Twin Gauntlet Get your “runners” past the enemy and prevent enemy runners from getting past you. Warbands: In addition to your regular warband, add six “runners”: creatures costing up to 3 points each. Runners may not have the Difficult ability. Your warband can exceed the normal twelve-creature limit.

TEAM SCENARIOS With four players, you can play team battles. You and your teammate work together to defeat the other team. With six players, you can play two teams of three or three teams of two. It’s possible to play team battles with eight players or more, but four is the most common number, and the most manageable. Each team keeps one victory point total. The score needed to win is based on the total cost of both warbands in the team. (For example, in the Quick Strike scenario, your team wins if it eliminates enemy creatures totaling 70% of your combined warbands’ cost.) Teammates generally sit across from each other, so that you have an opponent to your right and to your left. That way, two warbands on the same team don’t take turns one right after the other. Most two-player scenarios work fine for team battles.

Illus. by S. Tappin

A rival has dispatched a lean, specialized warband intent on bringing down the enemy. This strike team needs to exploit the target warband’s weakness to win. The target warband can win by countering the attacker’s tactics. Warbands: One player uses his or her preconstructed warband. The other constructs a warband knowing the makeup of the enemy warband but spending only 75 points (or 75% of the first warband’s cost, if it’s not 100 points). Victory: You win by eliminating your opponent’s entire warband.

CHAPTER 5:

Strike Team

SKIRMISH RULES

can deploy reinforcements next to enemy creatures. Once all reinforcements are assembled, continue the round as normal. Victory: The winner is the first player to score 150 points by eliminating creatures.

Mark or otherwise indicate the runners. Don’t let them get confused with other similar creatures in your warband that aren’t runners. You and your opponent should have warbands of equal size. If the warbands aren’t built with 100 points of creatures, then you each get one runner per 15 points. Special Rule—Open-Ended Battle Grid: Both players set up warbands as usual on the assembly tiles, but the short edges of the battle grid are considered to be open instead of walls. Walls and impassable terrain cannot be placed within 2 squares of these open edges. (If either player is using the assembly tile with the statue, both must use their respective right-hand corners of the battle grid as entry corners.) Routing creatures move toward the nearest square on their warband’s side of the battle grid, then exit straight off, instead of having to run to their exit corner. Victory: Each player tries to move his or her runners off the opponent’s end of the battle grid. Whoever exits the most runners is the winner. Note: If you and your friends have the right miniatures handy, this makes a good scenario to add to Table 5–4: Random Basic Scenarios (adjusting the percentage chances accordingly).

Good against Evil Here’s a scenario that requires exactly four players, playing as teams, to pull off. Warbands: Each player constructs a 100-point warband of a different faction: one Lawful Good, one Chaotic Good, one Lawful Evil, and one Chaotic Evil. Additionally, each warband has 100 points of preselected reinforcements that start the battle in reserve. Teams: The two players with good warbands are teammates, as are the two players with evil warbands. Special Rule—Double Reinforcements: At the end of each round, roll 2d20 and note the result, adding it to the “reinforcement total.” When that total reaches 100 or higher, all reinforcements deploy at the start of the next round. Starting with either player from the team that has the most victory points and going around the table to the left, each player places reinforcements on his or her own assembly tile. You can deploy reinforcements next to enemy creatures. Once all reinforcements are assembled, continue the round as normal. Victory: The winning team is the one that first scores 400 points. (That is, the team that eliminates both enemy warbands, including all their reinforcements.)

109

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:07 AM Page 110

SKIRMISH RULES Illus. by D. Hanley

CHAPTER 5:

CHALLENGE SKIRMISHES

places an assembly tile in either corner at the opposite end of the grid from the Shrine tile. Just as a Dungeon Master in a roleplaying campaign sets up an The blackguard player places the Human Blackguard adventure and then challenges players to take it on, you can set and Hell Hounds on the Shrine tile. The chalup a “challenge skirmish” and then invite your friends to fight it. lenger places the wandering monsters on Typically, you define all the aspects of the challenge except the the six other terrain tiles but not on his challenger’s warband. You construct the opposing waror her own assembly tile. Divide wandering band, choose the terrain and how to place it, and decide Wood Elf Skirmisher monsters as evenly as possibly over the six teron the setup rules, victory conditions, and any special rain tiles. (You can’t have three creatures on rules for the scenario. one tile, for example, if you have only one Challenge skirmishes focus less on who wins than on another tile.) standard head-to-head battles do. Rather, they are opporThe exit corner opposite the tunities to try new things with your miniatures. If a challenger’s assembly tile is the challenge skirmish is too hard or too easy (so that blackguard warband’s exit. Don’t it’s not challenging for both players), then adjust place tiles in such a way that walls the scenario until it’s a close battle. block any of the five exit squares. Infernal Assistance: At the beginSample Challenge Skirmish: ning of the fourth round, and each Blackguard’s Dungeon round after that, if the Human BlackA blackguard leads a pack of hell hounds in a monsterguard is on the sacred circle, a random filled dungeon. The challenger leads a warband Lawful Evil Outsider creature may appear through the dungeon to destroy the blackguard on the sacred circle with it. Roll d% and conbefore it can call in more creatures from Hell. sult the table below. Warbands: The blackguard player has There must be an open square within the one Human Blackguard (46 points) sacred circle for the creature to appear in. If none is available, and three Hell Hounds (10 points the creature does not appear on that round but “waits” until a each). In addition, there are 30 square is open at the start of a later round. If, at the beginning points’ worth of neutral and evil of a subsequent round, there are more creatures available to “wandering monsters” spread out across the battle grid. (Creaappear than there are open squares, the blackguard player tures that fight only with a good faction are not allowed.) The chooses which ones appear. wandering monsters activate as part of the blackguard player’s warband but are treated as having Difficult 20. (They’re not really d% Lawful Evil Outsider working for the Human Blackguard, they’re just taking the 01–20 Nothing opportunity to attack intruders.) 21–30 Azer Raider The challenger builds a standard 100-point warband. 31–70 Hell Hound Alternatively, both players can “bid” to be the challenger. Who71–90 Barghest ever is willing to build the challenger’s warband with fewer 91–100 Bearded Devil points gets to do so. For example, you think you can take on the Blackguard and its cronies with 90 points, while your opponent doesn’t want to bid lower than 95 points. You get to be the chalBalancing: If you need to balance the scenario one way or lenger, but you must construct a 90-point warband instead of a another, you can change what creatures are wandering monsters. 100-point one. You can even add good wandering monsters, such as Crested Setup: Place the Shrine tile at one end of the battle grid. Six Felldrakes, that the challenger activates but that count as having other terrain tiles are spread across the battle grid. The challenger Difficult 20 (just like the neutral and evil wandering monsters).

pqqqqrs SQUAD RULES If you want to fight skirmishes with more creatures on the battle grid, you can use the following simple squad rules. Squad rules allow you to activate a group of creatures at one time, giving an advantage to creatures that are individually weak but that work together more effectively. All players need to agree ahead of time to use squad rules. When using squads, play with larger warbands (try 200 points and up to twenty-four creatures).

ACTIVATING A SQUAD When a creature activates, up to five other creatures with the same name may also activate. All these activated creatures constitute a squad. Each such creature must be within 2 squares of another creature in the squad. You determine which creatures are going to activate as part of the squad, then activate them one at a time normally. This rule allows you to activate up to a dozen creatures (two squads of six) in one phase instead of just two creatures.

All creatures that can activate as part of a squad do so. If more than six creatures could qualify as part of the squad, you determine which six count. Command and Squads: If the original activating creature starts its turn under command or out of command, all other members of that squad are likewise under command or out of command, respectively, when they activate. Thus, squad members can act under command even if they wouldn’t be under command normally when activating. Squads Not a Unit: A squad doesn’t necessarily move and act as a group, the way a unit does in mass battles (see Chapter 6 of this book). The squad members activate in the same phase but can take different actions. Being “in a squad” just means having the ability to activate in the same phase as nearby creatures of the same kind. The squad doesn’t have any identity other than when its members are activating. Two creatures can activate as part of a squad in one round and activate separately in the next round.

pqqqqrs

110

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:17 AM Page 111

Victory: The challenger wins by eliminating the Human Blackguard. The blackguard player wins by eliminating the challenger’s entire warband.

THE SKIRMISH CAMPAIGN

Before playing your first battle in the campaign, choose how it will be structured.

Step 1: Length Before battles begin, you need to decide how many points you’ll be playing to: 100, 140, or 180. (Try a shorter campaign at first.) Campaign Type Quick Major Epic

Target Score 100 140 180

Step 2: Warlords

CHAPTER 5:

SETTING UP THE CAMPAIGN

SKIRMISH RULES

In addition to playing individual skirmishes, you can play extended campaigns. In a campaign, players fight a series of skirmishes, and the warbands and their leaders grow in power until one player claims final victory. Generally speaking, you’ll want at least four regular players for an enjoyable campaign. It’s not a problem for new players to join a campaign in progress.

All players in any campaign start with a score of 50. As play continues, winners’ scores rise and losers’ scores drop (see Victory and Loss, later in this section). Campaign play continues until one player’s score equals or exceeds the campaign’s target score (100, 140, or 180). At that point, the top two players square off in a final scenario. The winner of that skirmish wins the campaign. If more than two players reach or exceed the target score at the same time, the top two fight the final skirmish. If three or more players are tied for the top score, they play the final scenario as a multiplayer skirmish. For example, Jess is playing in a quick campaign. After winning seven skirmishes and losing four, he becomes the first player to reach a score of 100. That triggers the final skirmish against the second-ranked player—winner takes all. Once you’ve confirmed the starting group of players, each player chooses a specific commander with a cost of up to 25 points to serve as the player’s warlord. This warlord appears in every skirmish, while the regular creatures come and go.

Step 3: Warbands Each player designs a 50-point warband that includes his or her warlord and four terrain tiles. No “Upstaging” Warlord: Your warband can’t include any commanders with a higher Commander rating than your warlord. The warband, after all, is under that warlord’s command.

pqqqqrs

CAMPAIGN BASICS Here is a summary of the steps in setting up and playing a skirmish campaign. Each of these steps is explained in more detail in the accompanying text.

A warlord that wins but dies, or one that loses, returns without a gain.

1. Group defines campaign length. Each player starts with a score of 50. Quick: First player to 100 points wins. Major: First player to 140 points wins. Epic: First player to 180 points wins.

2. Players reconfigure warbands. Make changes before determining next opponent. Assign magic items. All warbands increase to 100 points when any player’s score reaches 75. All warbands increase to 200 points when any player’s score reaches 125.

2. Each player chooses a commander with a cost of up to 25 points to serve as warlord.

3. Return to “Playing a Round” and continue until one player wins the campaign.

SETTING UP THE CAMPAIGN

3. Each player creates an initial warband with 50 points of creatures including the warlord. No creature can have a higher Commander rating than the warlord. Each player selects four terrain tiles.

PLAYING A ROUND 1. Players pair off. 1st vs. 2nd, 3rd vs. 4th, and so on. Handicap: 10 points of creatures per 15 difference in scores. 2. Each pair rolls to determine a scenario. 3. Winner’s score increases by 10 (or by 15 in three-player campaign). Winner receives random magic item. Loser’s score decreases by 5. Loser may receive random magic item.

AFTER A ROUND

TWO- AND THREE-PLAYER CAMPAIGNS If there are only two players in the campaign, you’ll obviously be playing the same opponent over and over. You can still get a lot of variety in your battles, though, since you freely reconfigure your warband between skirmishes, and the scenarios offer very different challenges. Both players should reconfigure their warbands secretly to keep the nature of the enemy unknown. Consider playing only a quick campaign (to a score of 100) so that it will finish earlier, letting you start over with completely different warbands. You also have the option of switching to a new warlord during the campaign (see Reconfigure Warbands, later in this section), which can be especially important to keep options open with only two players. A three-player campaign is like a two-player campaign, except that the battles are three-player skirmishes. The last battle, however, is between only the two top-ranked players. Alternatively, you can play two-player skirmishes, arranging to meet and play in pairs rather than bringing all three players together at the same time.

1. A warlord that wins and survives advances 1 level.

pqqqqrs

111

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:17 AM Page 112

PLAYING A ROUND A campaign consists of an indefinite number of rounds. During each round, everyone plays an opponent. Playing in rounds ensures that everyone gets the chance to play the same number of battles.

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

Step 1: Pairing For the first round, players can pair off in any agreeable fashion. In subsequent rounds, pairing is based on scores. The two top-ranked players play each other, as do the third and fourth, fifth and sixth, and so on. If there are tied scores, the tied players roll randomly to see who plays whom. Two players who were matched up on the previous round, however, cannot play each other again until each has played someone else. For example, Jim, Jess, Evan, and Patrick have gotten together for campaign play. After each has played the first round of the campaign, they are ranked as follows.

Illus. by D. Hanley

Player Jim Patrick Evan Jess

Score 90 80 75 60

In the next round, Jim and Patrick will play each other in one skirmish, while Evan and Jess play in another. If the players remain in this order after another round of play, Jim would play Evan in the following round (because he can’t play Patrick twice in a row, and Evan has the next highest score), while Patrick would square off against Jess. Handicap: If two opponents’scores are 15 or more points apart, the player with the lower score gets support troops as a handicap. For every 15 points by which one opponent’s score exceeds the other’s, the one with the lower score gets 10 points of support troops. Support troops are not counted when determining how many creatures can be in your warband, nor do they score victory points for enemies who eliminate them. Support troops cannot be commanders. You may not reconfigure your warband when you add the support troops. The 10 points are spent separately on creatures, and those creatures leave your warband after the battle is over. Three-Player Skirmishes: If the campaign has an odd number of players, the three lowest-ranking players play a threeplayer skirmish. The two lower-ranked players may get support troops as a handicap, based on the score of the top-ranked player in the skirmish. Good against Good: Some groups prefer not to have two good warbands fight each other. Following this policy, however, can skew your campaign unless you balance things carefully. For instance, it benefits the more experienced players if they’re both playing good warbands and don’t have to play each other. The easiest solution is just to let any warband fight any other.

Step 2: Determine Scenario One member of each group of competing players rolls 1d20 and consults Table 5–4: Random Basic Scenarios to determine which scenario they will play.

112

Large Monstrous Spider

Step 3: Victory and Loss After a battle, the victor gains ground and the loses falls back. Magic Item Destruction: Each player picks a single magic item that was carried by a destroyed (but not routed) creature belonging to the player on his or her left and rolls 1d20. On a roll of 16 or higher, that magic item is destroyed. Score Changes: Each battle won increases a player’s score by 10 and each battle lost decreases it by 5. (In the unlikely event of a draw, neither player’s score changes.) Three-Player Skirmishes: The winner’s score increases by 15. Each loser’s score decreases by 5. Warband Increases: In addition to determining the final campaign battle, players’ scores also determine the size of everyone’s warbands. Play starts with 50-point warbands (see Setting up the Campaign, above). Once any player’s score reaches 75, everyone’s warband size increases to 100 points. Similarly, once any player reaches a score of 125, everyone’s warband size increases to 200 points. Warbands do not drop down again in size even if the top player’s score falls below 75 or 125. Gaining Magic Items: The winner of each battle gains a random magic item (see Magic Items for more information). Each loser also has a 50% chance to gain a random magic item. In the event of a draw, each player has a 50% chance to gain a magic item.

AFTER A ROUND Warbands can change between rounds. Once the players have updated their warbands, the next round can begin.

Step 1: Warlord Advancement If you win a scenario with your warlord alive and on the battle grid, it attains a new level in the warlord prestige class. (This very simplified prestige class is presented here instead of in Chapter 1: Characters because it applies only to skirmish campaigns.) A warlord that is destroyed or that flees the battle does not advance in level, even if you win the scenario. A warlord can never lose a level for any reason. If it is routed or destroyed, it returns at full strength before the next battle. Each level of the warlord prestige class provides the following benefits: —level +1. —melee attack +1.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:17 AM Page 113

—ranged attack (if any) +1. —+5 hp. —an additional +5 hp or an additional use of a spell your warlord can already cast. Warlords that aren’t spellcasters simply gain attack +1 and +10 hp each level. Spellcasters can choose whether they want +10 hp, or +5 hp and another use of one of their existing spells. For every two levels your warlord gains in the warlord prestige class, its Commander rating increases by 1.

Reassigning Magic Items Between skirmishes, you can reassign magic items. Each magic item is assigned to a particular creature, following certain restrictions (see Assigning Magic Items, below). A creature may have more than one magic item, but bonuses from magic items of the same type don’t stack. If you remove a creature from a warband, you can reassign its magic items to other creatures.

MAGIC ITEMS

Scattered throughout the ruins and dungeons that warlords fight over are the remnants of mighty battles of the past. Warbands often find magic items of various kinds on their incursions into these areas. In a campaign, a warband that wins a skirmish gets a random magic item and one that loses has a 50% chance to get a random magic item.

MAGIC ITEM EFFECTS Some magic items grant bonuses to a creature’s statistics or special ability ratings. These bonuses are cumulative with other such bonuses (although bonuses from magic items of the same type don’t stack). For example, a creature can have magic armor that grants a +1 bonus to AC and a ring that grants a +2 bonus to AC, for a total bonus of +3. The benefit of a magic item that grants a special ability does not stack with the benefit of an existing special ability. For example, a creature with the Hide special ability gains no additional benefit from drinking a potion that grants the Hide special ability. Many magic items duplicate the effects of special abilities or spells. The effects of potions are like the effects of spells. Just as the bonuses from two identical spells aren’t cumulative, the bonuses from two identical potions (or from a potion and a spell with an identical effect) aren’t cumulative. Certain other magic items duplicate spells, using a spell’s name in their description. The benefit of a magic item whose effect

When your warband gains a magic item, you assign it to a creature in the warband. You can reconfigure your warband before assigning magic items to creatures. In the miniatures rules, there are limits to which creatures can use which items. These limits are stricter than the limits in the roleplaying rules because they’re intended to simplify the changes to your creatures. To find out what items a creature is using, look at the roleplaying statistics on the stat card. Assigning Armor: You can assign magic armor only to a creature that is already wearing armor. The armor is assumed to be the same type as the armor that the creature is already wearing, so it does not affect speed and it changes Armor Class only by the amount of its enhancement bonus. Assigning Shields: You can assign a magic shield only to a creature that is already using a shield. The shield is assumed to be the same type as the one that creature already has, so it changes Armor Class only by the amount of its enhancement bonus. (Animated shields are an exception; see Table 5–8. Even so, you can’t assign an animated shield to an arcane spellcaster.) Assigning Weapons: You can assign a magic weapon only to a creature that is already wielding a weapon. When you do so, decide which weapon is being replaced by a magical version. (A creature cannot be assigned a ranged weapon if it does not have a ranged attack.) A creature cannot have more magic weapons than the number of weapons it started with. The magical benefits apply only to attacks with the magic weapon. When a combatant with two weapons makes more than one attack, at least one attack must be made by each weapon (so if only one weapon is magic, at least one attack must be with a nonmagical weapon). Assigning Scrolls: You can assign a scroll only to a spellcaster. Assigning Potions, Rings, and Wondrous Items: In general, any creature can use these items. If the item has to be activated (such as a ring of invisibility or a necklace of fireballs), only a creature with an Intelligence score of 3 or higher can use it. Drinking a potion is like casting a personal-range spell. Activating a ring or a wondrous item replaces the creature’s attacks for the round. Many rings and wondrous items, however, don’t need to be activated at all. Incorporeal creatures can’t use magic items. Reassigning Magic Items: Between battles, you can reassign magic items from one creature to another. Certain magic items may change their nature when you reassign them. For example, if you transfer magic armor from a Sword of Heironeous to Jozan, Cleric of Pelor, it changes from full plate to scale mail. (The armor isn’t actually transforming; instead the warband, “back in town” between battles, is trading in one set of magic armor for another set.) Magic Items Worn and Carried: A creature can wear or carry a number of different magic items, as outlined in the following list. (The list assumes a creature with a humanoidshaped body; creatures of other sorts may not have the requisite body shape or extremities to take advantage of all these kinds of items. For example, a Hyena cannot use a pair of gloves.) Table 5–12: Wondrous Items gives the “body slot” taken up by a wondrous item if its name does not identify what kind of item it is.

SKIRMISH RULES

Between skirmishes, players can change their warbands as much as they like, but they must use a warlord in every skirmish. They may also change their terrain tile choices between skirmishes. Changing Your Warlord: Between skirmishes, you can place your warband under a different warlord. This new warlord starts with no levels in the warlord prestige class, even if your previous warlord had advanced in level. Changing warlords reduces your score by 5, just as if you had lost one extra skirmish. Your warband also loses all magic items that it accumulated under its former warlord. You can choose a warlord of a different faction to replace your previous warlord. You can bring a previous warlord back into play in a later scenario. In such a case, the warlord comes back into play with no levels in the warlord prestige class.

Assigning Magic Items

CHAPTER 5:

Step 2: Reconfigure Warbands

specifically duplicates those of a spell is not cumulative with the benefit of that spell. The +2 bonus to AC from an amulet of natural armor, for example, specifically grants the wearer the equivalent of the barkskin spell. Therefore, this bonus is not cumulative with the same bonus granted by barkskin.

113

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:17 AM Page 114

Table 5–7: Magic Armor Additional Benefit — — Powerful Charge +51 +1 Commander rating (if any) 61–65 Lionheart +1 Fearless 66–70 Shadow +1 Hide 71–75 Spell resistance +1 Spell Resistance 76–79 Acid resistance +1 Resist 10 Acid 80–83 Cold resistance +1 Resist 10 Cold 84–87 Electricity resistance +1 Resist 10 Electricity 88–91 Fire resistance +1 Resist 10 Fire 92–95 Sonic resistance +1 Resist 10 Sonic 96–97 +3 armor +3 — 98–99 Invulnerability +1 DR 5 100 Etherealness +1 Incorporeal while moving) 1 Stazcks with the benefit of Powerful Charge if the creature already has that special ability.

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

d% 01–25 26–40 41–50 51–60

Armor Type +1 armor +2 armor Charging Command

AC Bonus +1 +2 +1 +1

Table 5–8: Magic Shields

Illus. by D. Hanley

Bearded Devil

• • • •

• • • • • • • • •

One helmet One amulet One shirt or vest One set of magic armor (armor-wearing creatures only) One shield (shield-using creatures only) One magic melee weapon (or two, for a wielder of two weapons) One magic ranged weapon (if creature can make ranged attacks) One belt One cloak One pair of gauntlets, bracers, or gloves Two rings One pair of boots Any number of potions and scrolls, or other items not listed above

Random Magic Items When you win a skirmish, roll randomly to see what type of magic item you recover. Table 5–6: Random Magic Items directs you to one of six other tables, each of which you roll on for a specific magic item. A warband that loses a scenario has a 50% chance of gaining a random magic item.

Table 5–6: Random Magic Items d% 01–15 16–25 26–45 46–60 61–70 71–85 86–100

Magic Item Armor (Table 5–8) Shield (Table 5–9) Weapon (Table 5–10) Potion (Table 5–11) Ring (Table 5–12) Scroll Wondrous item (Table 5–13)

Magic Armor and Shields

114

Magic armor or a magic shield provides a bonus to the wearer’s Armor Class and sometimes grants an additional benefit as well.

d% 01–25 26–40 41–50

Shield Type +1 shield +2 shield Lion’s shield

AC Bonus +1 +2 +2

Additional Benefit — — Additional melee attack at highest rating ❑❑❑ (5 damage) 51–60 Arrow deflection +1 Deflect Arrows (+4 AC against ranged attacks) 61–70 Spined shield +1 Gain ranged attack +[#] ❑❑❑ (5 damage); [#] = level (not cumulative with existing ranged attacks 71–75 +3 shield +3 — 76–79 Acid resistance +1 Resist 10 Acid 80–83 Cold resistance +1 Resist 10 Cold 84–87 Electricity resistance +1 Resist 10 Electricity 88–91 Fire resistance +1 Resist 10 Fire 92–95 Sonic resistance +1 Resist 10 Sonic 96–98 Animated +1/+3 +1 AC if already using a shield; +3 AC if not using a shield1 99–100 Winged shield +3 Gain F8 speed in addition to other speed ratings 1 Can be assigned to a creature with no shield only if that creature is proficient with shields as a class feature or creature trait and does not cast arcane spells.

Magic Weapons Magic weapons provide a bonus on attack rolls and sometimes grant an additional effect as well. Magic Damage: Damage dealt by a magic weapon is magic damage. It therefore ignores Damage Reduction. Some magic weapons deal extra energy damage as well (see below). Extra Damage: Extra damage, such as the additional 5 points of fire damage from a flaming weapon, is not doubled when the base damage is doubled, such as on a critical hit. Thrown Weapon: If a creature wields a thrown weapon, it may be assigned a magic ranged weapon. The benefit of the

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:18 AM Page 115

weapon, however, applies only to the first ranged attack the creature makes in each skirmish.

Table 5–9: Magic Weapons

Speed

+1

M, R

94–68

Anarchic

+1

M, R

69–73

Axiomatic

+1

M, R

74–78

Holy

+1

M, R

79–83

Unholy

+1

M, R

84–85

Ghost touch

+1

M

63

Fear burst

+1

M, R

91–95

Paralytic burst

+1

M, R

96–100

Deadly +1 M, R precision 1 M = melee, R = ranged. 2 Piercing or slashing weapon only. 3 Does not stack with other effects that grant extra attacks. 4 Stacks with the benefit of the Smite ability, if any.

Table 5–11: Rings d% 01–05 06–10 11–15 16–20 21–25 31–35 36–65 66–80

Ring Energy resistance, minor (acid) Energy resistance, minor (cold) Energy resistance, minor (electricity) Energy resistance, minor (fire) Energy resistance, minor (sonic) Chameleon power Protection Force shield1

Effect Resist 10 Acid Resist 10 Cold Resist 10 Electricity

Resist 10 Fire Resist 10 Sonic Hide +2 AC +2 AC, only if not using a shield 81–90 Invisibility1 Invisible until wearer attacks (unlimited uses) 91–100 Spell storing1 Gain magic missile ❑❑❑ (sight; 5 damage) 1 Only a creature with Intelligence 3 or higher can wear this ring.

Scrolls Scrolls contain the power of spells, and only a spellcaster can release this power. Once a scroll is used, it’s gone and can never be used again. For each scroll a spellcaster has, that spellcaster can cast one copy of a spell it already knows. Define which spells the scrolls contain before a skirmish starts. (You can redefine which spell a scroll contains between skirmishes, which represents the spellcaster trading one scroll in for another.) For example, if your Cleric of Gruumsh has a scroll, you decide whether it allows the Cleric to cast an extra doom, inflict moderate wounds, or bear’s endurance spell.

Potions

Illus. by G. Staples

86–90

Effect — — — Damage +5 fire Damage +5 cold Damage +5 electricity Score critical hit on natural 19 or 20 Additional attack at highest rating3 Damage +10 against lawful creatures4 Damage +10 against chaotic creatures4 Damage +10 against evil creatures4 Damage +10 against good creatures4 Attacks Incorporeal creatures as if wielder had Incorporeal ability On a natural 20, creature struck must make a morale save On a natural 20, creature struck is paralyzed (save DC 17 negates) Sneak Attack (if any) damage +10

CHAPTER 5:

Type1 M, R M, R M, R M, R M, R M, R M

Weapon +1 weapon +2 weapon +3 weapon Flaming Frost Shock Keen2

Rings provide continuous magical benefits to those who wear them. Most rings grant an effect; rings of protection improve a creature’s Armor Class.

SKIRMISH RULES

Attack Bonus +1 +2 +3 +1 +1 +1 +1

d% 01–25 26–40 41–42 43–47 48–52 53–57 58–62

Rings

Wondrous Items

Potions are spells stored in liquid form. Creatures drink potions to gain magical effects. Drinking a Potion: Drinking a potion replaces a creature’s attacks for its turn. Potion Effects: Some potions duplicate spell effects and are named for those spells. In this case, a creature that drinks the potion gains the effect as if someone had cast that spell on it. Other potions have described effects. These effects last until the end of the skirmish.

Wondrous items have varied magic effects. Most of them grant the user a continuous benefit.

Table 5–10: Potions d% 01–10

Potion Bear’s endurance

11–20 21–30

Blur Cat’s grace

31–50 51–70 71–80 81–85 86–90 91–100

Cure light wounds Cure moderate wounds Major resistance Protection from energy (fire) Resist energy (fire) Shield of faith

Effect Living creature gains +10 hp Conceal 6 +2 AC, ranged attack +2 Heal 5 hp Heal 10 hp Save +3 Immune Fire Resist 10 Fire +2 AC

Dire Ape

115

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:18 AM Page 116

Table 5–12: Wondrous Items d% 01–04 05–08

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

09–12 13–14

15–18 19–21

22–24 25–27 28

29

Item Amulet of fortune prevailing Amulet of health

Amulet of natural armor Bag of tricks

Belt of one mighty blow Boots of big stepping

Boots of charging Boots of striding and springing Boots, winged

30–33

Bracers of archery, greater Bracers of archery, lesser

34–37

Bracers of armor

38–41

Bracers of quick strike

42 43–46

Brooch of shielding Circlet of blasting, minor

Body Slot1 Effect Reroll one save per battle As bear’s endurance (living creature gains +10 hp) As barkskin (+2 AC) — Once per skirmish, replaces attacks: Place a Wolf adjacent to the creature. The Wolf is part of your warband (cost 0) Smite +5 ❑ Gain dimension door ❑ (self; place wearer in any space it can see at least part of) Powerful Charge +52 Speed +2

A H

Gain F8 speed in addition to other speed ratings Ranged attack +2 with a bow (not crossbow) Ranged attack +1 with a bow (not crossbow) As mage armor (+4 AC), only if not wearing armor As snake’s swiftness ❑ (may make immediate attack) Immune magic missile Gain searing light ❑ (sight; 10 damage, or 20 damage to undead)

SKIRMISH GLOSSARY

This glossary explains game terms, as well as keywords that appear on stat cards. It also contains detailed information on certain special abilities that are too complex to explain on the stat cards.

GUIDELINES TO READING ENTRIES

116

This glossary uses a few shorthand terms. [#]: This symbol represents a variable numerical value. For example,the “Conceal [#]” entry describes the Conceal ability but assigns no particular number to it. A given creature has a specific Conceal rating, such as Conceal 6. CAPITALS: A capitalized word, such as “CREATURE” or “ENERGY,” stands for a variable entry. For example, “Immune ENERGY” means that the creature takes no damage from a given type of energy but does not specify the energy type. A Large Fire Elemental, for example, has Immune Fire. ❑: Many special abilities and spells (and even some attacks) can only be used a limited number of times during a skirmish. In such cases, each available use is represented by an empty box. Mark off one box (or keep a record in some other way) each time the ability or spell is used. If a limited-use ability requires a successful attack, such as the Sun Soul Initiate’s Stunning Attack ability, then the attacking player declares the use of the ability

d% 47–50

Item Cloak of Charisma

51–53

Cloak of displacement, minor Cloak of etherealness

54 55–58 59–62

Cloak of resistance Collar of command

63–66

Gloves of Dexterity

67–70

Gloves of fortunate striking

71–75 76–78

Helm of glorious recovery Mantle of spell resistance Necklace of fireballs

79

80–83 84–87

Periapt of proof against poison Sandals of sprinting

Body Slot1 Effect As eagle’s splendor (+2 Commander rating [if any]) Conceal 6

A

C A

A

Incorporeal while moving As conviction (save +2) (Animal only) Lose Difficult ability As cat’s grace (+2 AC, ranged attack +2) Reroll one attack per battle (must use result of second roll) Heal (self; 25 hp) ❑ Spell Resistance Gain fireball ❑❑ (sight; radius 4; 20 fire damage; DC 15); item is then used up Immune Poison

B

Speed +6 for one turn ❑ 88–90 Scarab of protection A Spell Resistance 91–93 Scepter of obedience — +1Commander rating (if any) 94–97 Shirt of false life +10 hp 98–100 Shirt of resilience DR 5 1 A = amulet, B = boots, C = cloak, H = helmet. 2 Stacks with the benefit of Powerful Charge if the creature already has that special ability.

before making the attack roll. A miss counts as one use of the special ability just as a hit does.

DEFINITIONS The following terms are listed in alphabetical order. Aberration: A type of creature. Acid: (Damage Keyword) A type of energy. Action: A creature activity. You usually do not have to keep track of different sorts of actions. Usually an effect’s description contains the phrase “replaces attacks” or “replaces move” if it takes the place of the stated type of action. For those who are more comfortable thinking in those terms, each action is classified as one of the following types: standard, move, free, swift, and immediate. For example, “replaces attacks” is the equivalent of a standard action in the roleplaying rules. Generally, a creature gets one attack action and one move action on its turn, though a creature that does not attack can move twice. Active: An active creature is not routing, stunned, asleep, paralyzed, or rendered helpless. Adjacent: Occupying a square next to this space (including diagonally). A creature is not considered to be adjacent to creatures behind walls or other objects that block line of sight and effect. Ally/Allied Creature: Allies are usually other creatures in the

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:18 AM Page 117

Illus. by T. Hairsine

Animals and Magical Beasts in your warband that are of a level equal to or lower than a creature’s Beastmaster rating are treated as if they did not have the Difficult special ability. Most creatures with this special ability are also commanders, but their Commander rating may not be the same as their Beastmaster rating. If all creatures with the Beastmaster ability in a warband are eliminated, allied Animals and Magical Beasts revert to their original Difficult ratings. Blinded: (Spell/Ability Effect) A blinded creature does not have line of sight to any other creature. It cannot make ranged attacks or cast spells with a range other than “touch,” “self,” or “your warband.” A blinded creature does not threaten adjacent squares and so does not get to make attacks of opportunity. A blinded creature treats all other creatures as having the Invisible special ability. Movement when Blinded: A blinded creature’s speed is effectively halved: Each square counts as 2 squares and each diagonal counts as 3 squares. (In difficult terrain, each square costs 4 squares and each diagonal costs 6 squares.) Blind-Fight: Creatures of the darkness and highly trained troops can fight by ear and instinct, even against enemies they can’t see. A creature with this special ability can roll twice against an enemy creature’s Conceal special ability when making a melee attack. If either result is a success, the attack hits. The creature can also move at normal speed even if it’s blinded. Attackers the creature cannot see do not gain a bonus when making melee attacks against the creature. A creature with Blind-Fight still can’t see invisible enemies, so it can’t make attacks of opportunity against them. The creature ignores Gaze Attack effects. Blindsight: A creature with this special ability can detect enemies by using nonvisual senses. It automatically succeeds on rolls against an enemy creature’s Conceal ability. It can also move at normal speed even if it can’t see. Attackers the creature cannot see do not gain a bonus when making melee attacks against the creature. A creature with Blindsight ignores Gaze Attack effects, invisibility effects, and the Hide ability, and it has the Immune Blindness special ability. Blood Rock: Any creature on blood rock terrain scores a critical hit when its melee attack roll is a natural 19 or 20. The critical hit automatically hits no matter how high the defender’s Armor Class, even if the defender is immune to double damage from critical hits. Ranged attacks are not affected by the blood rock terrain type. (Creatures immune to critical hits are still immune.)

CHAPTER 5:

Dire Lion

SKIRMISH RULES

same warband. In team battles, allies include creatures in a teammate’s warband. Animal: A type of creature. Any: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A spell or special ability that uses this word does not follow the usual restriction of targeting only the nearest enemy or nearest ally. (Line of sight and range restrictions still apply, unless indicated otherwise.) For example, the phrase “switch positions of any two creatures” can affect any two creatures in line of sight of the caster and within the spell’s range. Any Warband: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A range given in the description of certain spells and abilities. It works like “your warband” (see that entry), except that you can choose any one warband as the target: your own, a teammate’s, or even an opponent’s. Armor Class: A number that represents a creature’s ability to avoid being hit in combat. If the result of an attack roll equals or exceeds the enemy’s Armor Class, the attack hits. Attack: There are two types of attacks, melee and ranged. The outcome of an attack is determined by an attack roll. Many bonuses and penalties conferred by spells and special abilities can affect a creature’s attack. If no attack type is specified, the effect applies to both melee and ranged attacks. A few special abilities, such as Gaze Attack, use the word “attack” in their names, but they still follow the rules for special abilities rather than the rules for attacks. Attack of Opportunity: A free melee attack. If an enemy moves out of a square threatened by a creature, the creature can make a single attack of opportunity against that enemy. There is no limit to the number of attacks of opportunity a creature can make in a round, but it can make only one in a given creature’s turn. A creature does not have to make an attack of opportunity. Attack Roll: A die roll to determine whether an attack hits. Roll 1d20 and add the relevant attack bonus (either melee or ranged), plus any modifiers from spells or situations such as flanking. If this number equals or exceeds the defender’s Armor Class, the result is a hit and the attack deals the indicated damage. Automatic Hit: An attack that hits regardless of the target’s Armor Class. A natural 20 on an attack roll is always an automatic hit, even if the target is immune to critical hits (although the Conceal special ability might still convert such a hit into an automatic miss). Automatic hits can also result from certain situations, such as a melee attack against a helpless enemy. Automatic Miss: An attack that misses regardless of the target’s Armor Class. A natural 1 on an attack roll is always an automatic miss. Automatic misses can also result from certain situations, such as a melee attack roll that is lower than an enemy’s Conceal rating. Battle Grid: The gridlined play map on which you place terrain cards and miniatures Beastmaster [#]: Druids and certain others can talk to beasts, helping them fight more tactically in a skirmish.

117

SKIRMISH RULES Illus. by S. Tappin

CHAPTER 5:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:19 AM Page 118

118

Bonuses: Most bonuses stack, except those from the same spell or effect. (See the stacking definition for what spell variations are considered to be the same as the base spell.) Burrow [#]: Certain subterranean creatures, such as the fearsome umber hulk, can travel underground almost as easily as they can walk. A creature with this ability can move underground instead of on the surface. If it chooses to burrow, it uses that mode for all of its movement that turn, and its speed is the listed rating. A burrowing creature ignores terrain effects on the surface while moving and can even pass through squares containing walls, though it must end its burrowing move in a legal position. While burrowing, a creature is immune to attacks of opportunity and cannot charge; at the end of its move, it returns to the surface and can attack and be attacked normally. An out of command creature with the Burrow ability can move underground at a speed of 2. However, it can rush at double its normal Burrow speed toward the nearest enemy it can see if it can reach that enemy during its turn. A routing creature with the Burrow ability can move underground, but only if doing so gets it closer to its exit corner than using one of its other movement modes. Chaotic: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Creatures in Chaotic Good or Chaotic Evil warbands are chaotic, regardless of the factions on the creatures’ stat cards. They can be affected by spells and special abilities that affect chaotic creatures. Charge: To charge, a creature moves at double speed directly toward the nearest enemy it can see at the start of its turn. If nothing slows it down and it moves at least 2 squares, that creature can make a single melee attack against that enemy with a +2 bonus on its attack roll. The charging creature must move to the nearest unoccupied space from which it can attack the nearest enemy. If any line traced between the creature’s starting space and ending space passes through a square that slows or prevents movement, or contains a creature (even an ally), the charge is not allowed. Cleave: Once per turn, if a creature with this ability destroys an enemy by reducing its hit points to 0 with its melee attack (even an attack of opportunity), it can immediately make one extra melee attack against another enemy. Cloud: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A cloud is a type of terrain created by a spell or ability. It is permanent and blocks line of sight but does not slow movement or block line of effect. However, creatures inside the cloud are blinded (which may affect their movement) and considered to have the Invisible special ability. Spells whose effect is a cloud, as with other permanent areas of effect (see that entry, below), can target any square rather than the nearest enemy or ally. Sometimes an effect that produces a cloud specifies that it doesn’t block line of sight, in which case it is simply an area of terrain with the noted effect.

Cold: (Damage Keyword) A type of energy. Commander [#]: A creature with the Commander special ability printed at the top of its stat card is a commander, with a Commander rating equal to the given number. Commander ratings are usually positive numbers, but a very few commanders have such poor leadership ability that their Commander ratings are 0 or even negative. Such a commander can still put creatures under command and can choose not to add its Commander rating on most morale saves, but its negative Commander rating does count as a penalty on a morale save made for a rally attempt. Commander Effect: Most commanders grant a benefit to their followers (creatures in their warband that are not themselves commanders) known as their Commander Effect. To get the benefit, a follower must be under command and within 6 squares of the Ogre commander (which is itself never affected by the benefit). Occasionally, a Commander Effect instead confers a disadvantage on enemy creatures. Such an effect also has a range of 6 squares but affects all enemies (even other commanders and Difficult creatures) in range. A creature can be subject to more than one Commander Effect at the same time, but modifiers to the same statistic from different commanders do not stack. For example, a creature could gain attack +2 from one commander and Morale Save +4 from another. If one commander grants attack +2 and another commander grants melee attack +4, the creature gains a +4 bonus on melee attacks and a +2 bonus on ranged attacks. A routing, stunned, confused, or helpless commander cannot put other creatures under command, and thus its Commander Effect does not function. Conceal [#]: Hitting a creature with the Conceal special ability, such as a displacer beast, is as much a question of raw luck as skill. When another creature gets an attack result against such a creature that would be a hit, the attacker must roll 1d20 again. If the result of the second roll equals or exceeds the creature’s Conceal rating, the attack hits; otherwise, it is an automatic miss. Even a natural 20 on the attack roll is a miss if the attacker’s roll against the defender’s Conceal ability fails. If several effects grant Conceal to a creature, only the highest rating applies. Cone: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A range given in the description of certain spells and abilities. A cone affects all creatures up to 6 squares away from the caster within a quarter-circle. The cone’s origin point (shown by arrows pointing out from it on the template) must be a corner of a square in the caster’s space. The squares in the cone template must align with the squares on the battle grid. The target of the spell or ability has to be somewhere inside the affected area, but you can otherwise position the cone in any legal orientation. Confusion: (Spell/Ability Effect) The umber hulk’s mesmerizing gaze causes troops to behave erratically.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:19 AM Page 119

The Confusion ability affects only living creatures. A creature subject to this effect becomes confused. Each time a confused creature activates, roll 1d20 and refer to the following table to determine what it does. d20 1–5

CHAPTER 5:

A confused creature cannot make attacks of opportunity. A confused commander can’t put other creatures under command or add its Commander rating to initiative checks, and its Commander Effect does not function. Construct: A type of creature. Constructs are not living creatures. All constructs have the following special abilities: Fearless; Immune Confusion, Critical Hits, Dominate, Incite, Paralysis, Poison, Sleep, Sneak Attack, Stun. Positive damage from heal effects (such as the various cure wounds spells) and negative damage (such as from inflict wounds spells) do not affect Constructs. Countersong: A bard’s song can interfere with enemy commanders’ ability to get the best from their troops. Creatures within 6 squares of a creature with this ability cannot benefit from or suffer from enemy commanders’ Commander Effects. The Commander Effects of enemy commanders within 6 squares of this creature do not function. Cover: Certain terrain features provide cover against attacks, granting a +4 bonus to the defender’s Armor Class. To determine whether a creature has cover from a ranged attack, the player who controls the attacking creature chooses a corner of a square in the attacking creature’s space. If a line traced from this point to any part of the target’s space passes through a square or border that provides cover (including a space occupied by another creature), the target has cover. The target does not have cover if the line runs along or merely touches the edge of a wall or other square that would otherwise provide cover. Creature: A single entity represented by a single miniature. Creature Type: One of several broad categories of creatures. The creature types are Aberration, Animal, Construct, Dragon, Elemental, Fey, Giant, Humanoid, Magical Beast, Monstrous Humanoid, Ooze, Outsider, Plant, Undead, and Vermin. A creature’s type may include a subtype, given in parentheses on its stat card. Critical Hit: A hit that strikes a vital area and deals double damage. Critical hits occur when the attacker rolls a natural 20 on the attack roll. Certain creature types are immune to critical hits; a roll of natural 20 is still an automatic hit, but it deals only normal damage. Damage: Melee and ranged attacks deal damage, as do many spells and special abilities. The various damage types are melee, ranged, energy (acid, cold, electricity, fire, and sonic), magic, negative, and positive. Melee and ranged damage is subject to Damage Reduction. Damage from spells is considered magic damage unless otherwise noted. Damage from creatures summoned by spells is of the type normally dealt by the creature (summoned creatures do not deal magic damage merely because they are the creation of a spell).

SKIRMISH RULES

6–15 16–20

Effect A random opponent controls the creature on this turn as if it were that opponent’s creature and as if it had the Difficult 20 ability. Your creatures can make attacks of opportunity against it if you wish, but the opponent temporarily controlling the confused creature receives the victory points if it is eliminated while under his or her control. It still counts as one of your activations for the phase. The creature stands still this turn, taking no action. You control this creature normally this turn. Even so, it remains confused until the duration of the effect is over.

If a special ability grants increased damage (as Smite does), then the extra damage is of the same type as the original damage. If the creature already deals base damage of one type and extra damage of another, the increased damage from the special ability is of the same type as the base damage, not the extra damage. For example, a Sword of Heironeous with a flaming sword deals magic damage plus extra fire damage. Additional damage from Smite would be magic damage, not fire damage. Double Damage: When calculating double damage, add extra damage after doubling the base damage. (For example, doubling the Large Fire Elemental’s melee damage of 10 + 5 fire results in total damage of 20 + 5 fire.) If the damaged creature has DR (see below), apply DR after the damage is doubled. Half Damage: When dividing damage in half, such as after a successful save, round down to the next lowest multiple of 5. For example, half of 15 points of damage is 5; half of 5 points of damage is 0. DC [#]: (Spell/Ability Keyword) DC stands for Difficulty Class. A creature can avoid or reduce certain effects by making a save. Roll 1d20 and add the creature’s level; the save succeeds if the result equals or exceeds the indicated DC. Death Attack (DC [#]): When a creature with this special ability is about to make a Sneak Attack, it can also attempt to use its Death Attack ability. This attempt must be declared before making the attack. A creature struck by a Death Attack must make a save against the indicated DC or be destroyed. Even if the save succeeds, the attacker still deals the extra damage with its Sneak Attack ability. This ability does not affect creatures that are immune to sneak attacks. Death Burst (ENERGY [#]; DC [#]): When a creature with this special ability is destroyed by damage, all adjacent creatures take the given amount of the indicated type of damage. A successful save reduces the damage to half. Deflect Arrows: A creature with this special ability gains a +4 bonus to its AC against ranged attacks. Destroy/Destroyed: A creature is destroyed when its hit points drop to 0 or lower. Certain spells or effects can also destroy a creature outright. Remove destroyed creatures from the battle grid. A destroyed creature scores victory points for the opponent responsible for its destruction. If a spell or ability (but not a scenario condition such as Eternal Battle’s returning casualties) somehow returns a destroyed creature to play, players who scored victory points for its destruction lose those points. Difficult [#]: Trolls only listen to a commander who is too strong to eat. Most commanders can’t keep one from rushing into battle. A creature with this special ability can be put under command only by a commander whose Commander rating is equal to or greater than the creature’s Difficult rating. For example, a Troll (Difficult 5) can be put under command only by a commander whose Commander rating is 5 or higher. Unlike normal creatures, an out of command creature with the Difficult special ability must rush the nearest enemy creature it can see if it can reach that enemy during its turn. If the nearest enemy is not close enough to get to, the creature acts like any other out of command creature. (Its speed becomes 2.) If the creature has a ranged attack and can attack the nearest enemy from its starting space it can stand and make a ranged attack instead of rushing. It also has this option if it can use a ranged spell or special ability to target the nearest enemy or ally. Difficult Terrain: Rubble, treasure heaps, and other obstacles that fill entire squares slow movement and prevent charges. Each

119

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:19 AM Page 120

120

square of difficult terrain costs 2 squares to move into (3 squares if it’s a diagonal move). However, a creature can always move at least 1 square (see Minimum Move, below). The effects of certain spells can turn squares into difficult terrain. Dominate/Dominated: (Spell/Ability Effect) Certain spells and abilities can dominate an enemy, causing it to become a member of your warband. Dominate affects only enemy creatures; it has no effect on allied creatures. You may activate a creature in the round when it becomes dominated only if the opponent hasn’t yet activated it. Treat a dominated creature as part of your army and under your control in most ways. For as long as you control the creature, it counts as eliminated for victory points—even if it is still on the battle grid. If it is destroyed while under your control, you keep the victory points for eliminating it. Double Speed: A creature that does not attack, cast a spell, or perform a standard action can move up to double its normal speed on its turn. A creature also rushes or charges toward the nearest enemy or routs at double speed. DR [#]: The barghest brushes off attacks by smaller weapons and easily withstands more powerful attacks. A magic sword, however, cuts through its supernatural resistance. DR stands for Damage Reduction. When a creature with this special ability takes damage from a melee or ranged attack, subtract the indicated amount from the damage dealt. Energy damage, damage from most spells, and magic damage are not reduced by Damage Reduction. Dragon: A creature type. Dragons come in all sizes, from the little crested felldrake to the mighty true dragons. All Dragons have the following special ability: Immune Paralysis, Sleep. Electricity: (Damage Keyword) A type of energy. Elemental: A type of creature. The fury of fire and the resilience of stone have their uses on the battlefield. All Elementals have the following special ability: Immune Critical Hits, Flanking, Paralysis, Poison, Sleep, Sneak Attack, Stun. Elf: A subtype of the Humanoid type. All Elves have the Immune Sleep special ability. Eliminated: Creatures that have been destroyed or routed off the battle grid are eliminated. They score victory points for the player whose creatures eliminated them. Enemy/Enemy Creature: Enemies are creatures in opponents’ warbands, not in your own or a teammate’s warband. Energy: (Damage Keyword) One of the following damage forms: acid, cold, electricity, fire, or sonic. Energy damage is not reduced by Damage Reduction. Entangle/Entangled: (Spell/Ability Effect) A creature subject to this effect is unable to move if it does not make a successful save against the effect’s indicated DC. At the end of an entangled creature’s turn, it makes another save (same DC). If this save succeeds, the entangle effect is removed and the creature can act normally on its next turn. Entangle effects sometimes produce an area of difficult terrain. Even if a creature succeeds on its save, if it is in that area, it must still pay the normal costs for movement through difficult terrain. Evil: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Creatures in Lawful Evil or Chaotic Evil warbands are evil, regardless of the factions on the creatures’ stat cards. They can be affected by spells and special abilities that affect evil creatures. Factions: These four broad categories classify creatures according to their moral and ethical viewpoint. Briefly, these are justice (Lawful Good), freedom (Chaotic Good), tyranny

(Lawful Evil), and destruction (Chaotic Evil). The faction a creature fights for may not always match the alignment it has in the roleplaying rules. Fearless: A creature with this special ability creature automatically succeeds on morale saves. It is not affected by effects that can make a creature frightened (see that entry, below). There is one exception to the Fearless ability: Undead creatures (which all have the ability) must make morale saves against the Turn Undead ability with normal chances of failure instead of automatic success. Fey: A type of creature. Fire: (Damage Keyword) A type of energy. Flanking/Flanked: A creature is flanked if it is in a square threatened by enemies on opposite sides or corners. If an imaginary line between two attacking creatures’ centers passes through opposite borders of the defender’s space (including corners of those borders), then those creatures are flanking the defender. When making a melee attack, a flanking creature gets a +2 bonus on the attack roll. Only a creature that threatens the defender’s square can help an attacker get the bonus for flanking. If a creature takes up more than one square, any square it occupies counts for flanking. Flight: A dragon’s wings give it a decided advantage on the battlefield. A creature with the Flight ability can fly over the battle grid instead of on the surface, landing at the end of its move. Its speed rating has an “F” prefix. It isn’t hindered by terrain features that normally slow movement, such as difficult terrain or statues. It must still fly around walls (which extend to the ceiling of the dungeon). It can move over a pit but cannot end its movement on one. A flying creature is immune to Entangle effects. The creature can move and even charge through squares that other creatures occupy (though it cannot end its movement in a space occupied by another creature or in an illegal position). It ignores attacks of opportunity from enemies after the first square of movement during its turn. (It spends that first square “taking off ” and is subject to attacks of opportunity only when it leaves its starting space.) Follower: A noncommander in your warband. For the purpose of determining which creatures can benefit from a Commander Effect, a follower is any creature that a commander has under command and is within 6 squares of that commander. Frighten/Frightened: (Spell/Ability Effect) A creature that is frightened is afraid but not routing. It takes a –4 penalty on attack rolls, saves, and Armor Class. Gaze Attack: (Replaces attacks: RANGE; EFFECTS AND CONDITIONS; DC [#]) Instead of making its normal attacks, a creature with this special ability can use a Gaze Attack against the nearest enemy. The enemy creature is subject to the indicated effect unless it succeeds on a save against the indicated DC. In addition, any creature within range of the Gaze Attack that targets the creature possessing the ability with a ranged attack, spell, or special ability must make a save after the attack in order to avoid the effect of the Gaze Attack. A Gaze Attack requires line of sight to work, but not line of effect. For example, a wall of shadow stops its effects, but a wall of force does not. A creature with Gaze Attack that has been rendered invisible cannot use this ability. Giant: A type of creature. Good: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Creatures in Lawful Good or Chaotic Good warbands are good, regardless of the factions on the creatures’ stat cards. They can be affected by spells and special abilities that affect good creatures.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:48 AM Page 121

CHAPTER 5:

Illus. by S. Tappin

creature (so it can help create flanking situations) but cannot make attacks or take any actions. Any attack against the illusion automatically succeeds. Any damage dealt to an illusion, whether by an attack or by a spell or special ability, removes the effect immediately. Spells and abilities that do not deal damage or remove spells have no effect on illusions. Immediate: (Spell/Ability Keyword and Action Type) A type of swift action (see that entry, below) that a creature may trigger instantly at any time, even when it is not its turn. This action may interrupt other actions, taking effect just before they do. The last immediate action declared takes place first. Immune EFFECT: A creature with an Immune ability is not affected by the indicated attack type, energy, ability, or condition. Creatures with multiple immunities have them listed in one entry, separated by commas; for example, a creature immune to cold- and fire-based effects would have the ability Immune Cold, Fire. Improved Countersong: Higher-level bards can use their songs to thwart enemy commanders. A creature with this ability is considered to have the Countersong ability (see above). In addition, enemy creatures within 6 squares of this creature cannot be put under command by other creatures. Enemy commanders within 6 squares of this creature cannot put other creatures under command. In a Square: A creature is “in” a square if any of its space occupies that square. In Melee: A creature is considered to be “in melee” if it is active and it threatens an enemy’s square, or if an active enemy threatens its square. Incite/Incited, Inhibit/Inhibited: (Spell/Ability Effect) A creature that has been incited by a spell or special ability must take its turn as early as possible in each round. Other creatures in its warband cannot act before it in a round unless they are also incited. A creature that has been inhibited must take its action as late as possible each round. Other creatures in its warband cannot act after it in a round unless they are also inhibited. Any creature that has the Immune Incite special ability also has Immune Inhibit. Incorporeal: The wraith floats through walls to ambush its enemies. A creature with this special ability is ghostly and insubstantial. Any time the creature would be damaged by an attack, or by a spell or special ability, roll 1d20; on a result of 11 or higher, the creature takes no damage. (It does not, however, get a chance to avoid attacks from other creatures that have the Incorporeal ability, nor is it protected from spells or special abilities that do not deal damage.) The creature’s movement is not affected by terrain. It can even move through walls and

SKIRMISH RULES

Heal [#]: (Spell/Ability Effect) This effect removes the indicated amount of damage from a wounded living creature. It can’t raise a creature’s hit points above its starting amount. A heal effect deals the indicated amount of positive damage to an Undead creature. The creature gets a save for half damage (DC 12 + the level of the spell, or if not a spell, the level of the creature producing the heal effect). Constructs are immune to heal effects, unless the spell or ability specifies otherwise, in which case only Construct creatures are healed by the effect. Helpless: A number of situations and effects can render a creature helpless. A helpless creature can’t move, attack, cast spells, threaten adjacent squares, make attacks of opportunity, grant a bonus for flanking, use special abilities that have to be activated or targeted, or put other creatures under command. Being helpless does not change a routing creature’s morale, but the condition that makes the creature helpless might keep it from being able to run away. Any melee attack against a helpless creature is automatically successful (no roll needed) and deals double damage. Ranged attacks deal normal damage and still need an attack roll to hit, but the attacker gets a +4 bonus on the roll. Other creatures can move through a helpless creature’s space but cannot end their movement there. Hide: If a creature with this ability has cover against a nonadjacent attacking creature from something other than intervening creatures (such as a wall or statue), it is considered to have the Invisible special ability against that attacking creature. This means (among other things) that a ranged attacker without Blindsight can’t see or target a creature with Hide that has such cover. HP: Hit points. A creature whose hit points drop to 0 is destroyed. If a spell or special ability grants extra hit points, this benefit removes damage from a wounded creature and can even increase its hit points above its starting amount (if the hp bonus exceeds damage already taken). Adding hit points in this way doesn’t affect when a creature reaches half hit points (for morale saves). Hit points in excess of the creature’s starting amount can’t be restored with a heal effect once they are lost. Humanoid: A type of creature. There are many subtypes of humanoids, including Elf, Halfling, Human, and Orc. Illusion: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Illusions can force an enemy into choosing between wasting her attacks or charging into your trap. Some spells and special abilities produce illusions, designating a square or squares as members of your warband. These are considered to produce permanent areas of effect (see that entry, below), which can target any unnoccupied square rather than the nearest enemy or ally. (In fact, such effects must target unoccupied squares.) This space counts as a member of your warband and affects moving creatures as normal: Enemy creatures cannot move through it, and your own creatures cannot charge through it or end their move in it. The space also counts as a member of your warband for purposes of determining the nearest enemy. It threatens adjacent squares as though it were an active

Displacer Beast

121

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:49 AM Page 122

over pits, though it cannot see through walls. It cannot end its movement on a pit, inside a wall, or in any other illegal position. It does not provoke attacks of opportunity when moving through walls. The creature can move through enemy creatures that don’t have the Incorporeal ability but can’t end its movement in a square occupied by a creature. Independent: A creature with this special ability is always under command. It is capable of rallying itself as a commander does, though without a commander it adds only its own level to the morale save, as if it were being rallied by a Commander 0. Invisible: (Spell/Ability Effect) Other creatures do not have line of sight to an invisible creature. The creature gains the Conceal 11 ability against attackers that can’t see it (generally, any creatures that do not have Blindsight). An enemy that cannot see an invisible creature does not threaten its square (and therefore can’t make opportunity attacks against it or prevent it from casting a spell or using a ranged attack). An invisible creature gains a +2 bonus on attacks made against enemies that can’t see it. Large: A Large creature has a 40 mm base and occupies a space 2 squares wide and 2 squares long. Lawful: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Creatures in Lawful Good or Lawful Evil warbands are lawful, regardless of the factions on the creatures’ stat cards. They can be affected by spells and special abilities that affect lawful creatures. Level: A measure of advancement or power applied to various aspects of the game. A creature applies its level as a bonus on saves. A spell’s level is a relative measure of its power; some spells and abilities refer to spell level. Line: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A range given in the description of certain spells and abilities. A line affects creatures in a straight line away from the caster toward the nearest enemy or ally. Trace a line from a corner of a square in the attacking creature’s space to a corner of a square in the target creature’s space. The line affects

Line A line affects creatures in a straight line away from the caster toward the nearest enemy. Trace an imaginary line from a corner of a square in the attacking creature’s space to a corner of a square in the target creature’s space. The line affects all squares that the line goes through or touches. The line continues to its full range, usually going past the target and Orc possibly affecting Berserker more creatures. A line does not affect creatures more than 12 squares away.

Elf Pyromancer with wand of lightning bolt

122

Orc Warrior

target corner

all squares that the line goes through or touches. The line continues to its maximum range, usually going past the target and possibly affecting more creatures. A line does not affect creatures more than 12 squares away. Line of Effect: Line of effect is nearly always the same as line of sight (see that entry, below). A few special effects, such as wall of force, block creatures’ movement and prevent them from attacking or affecting a space with a special ability or spell but do not block line of sight to that space. These effects are said to block line of effect. Line of Sight: A creature that can see a target has line of sight to it. Certain kinds of terrain, such as walls, block line of sight, as do effects such as the Invisible special ability. To determine line of sight, draw an imaginary line between any point in one creature’s space and any point in the other creature’s space. If any such line is not blocked, then the two creatures have line of sight to each other. The line is clear if it doesn’t intersect or even touch squares that block line of sight. If a creature can’t see the target (for example, due to the Invisible ability), it can’t have line of sight to that target even if you could draw an unblocked line between its space and the target’s. Living: All creatures are living, except for Constructs and Undead creatures. Magic Damage: (Damage Keyword) A type of damage that is not reduced by Damage Reduction (DR). Spells deal magic damage (and possibly also energy damage) unless otherwise indicated. Magical Beast: A type of creature. Medium: A Medium creature has a 25 mm (1 inch) base and occupies 1 square. If a creature’s stat card gives no size, the creature is assumed to be Medium. Melee Attack: One of the two attack types (see also Ranged Attack, below). Most creatures can make melee attacks only against adjacent creatures. Melee Reach [#]: A creature with this special ability can make melee attacks against enemies that are up to the indicated number of squares away. Use the ranged attack rules to determine whether the attacker has line of sight to the target and whether the target has cover. When determining whether a creature with Melee Reach can make a melee attack, count diagonals in the normal way. (A creature with Melee Reach 2 can’t attack an enemy in a square 2 diagonals away.) This ability does not allow a creature to threaten squares that are not adjacent or make attacks of opportunity against enemies that are not adjacent. Nor does it allow a creature to deliberately stop before it is adjacent to the enemy it is charging or rushing. A creature using Melee Reach to attack at a distance does not create a flanking situation. It is not considered to be in melee unless it is adjacent to a creature. Minimum Move: An active creature can always take its entire turn to move 1 square in any direction, even diagonally, regardless of difficult terrain or narrow spaces. (This rule doesn’t allow a creature to move through impassable terrain or to move when all movement is prohibited, such as while paralyzed.) Minions ([#] CREATURES): If you add a creature that has minions to your warband, you also get the indicated number of creatures at no additional cost. These minions do not add to your warband’s cost, nor do they score victory points for the opponent who eliminates them. Minions do not count against the twelve creature limit for your warband; a warband can contain twelve creatures plus minions. Mobility: A creature with this special ability gains a +4 bonus to its AC against attacks of opportunity. Monstrous Humanoid: A type of creature.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:49 AM Page 123

CHAPTER 5:

Illus. by G. Staples

Opponent: A player you are playing a battle against. Outsider: A type of creature. Paralysis: (Spell/Ability Effect) A creature subject to this effect is paralyzed if it does not make a successful save against the effect’s indicated DC. A paralyzed creature is helpless. At the end of a paralyzed creature’s turn, after it has missed its chance to act during that turn, it makes another save (same DC). If this save succeeds, the paralysis is removed and the creature can act normally on its next turn. Permanent Area of Effect: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Spells and abilities that create permanent areas of effect usually modify terrain within a radius of 2 or 4 squares. Unless otherwise specified, normal terrain within such areas is not removed. Instead, permanent areas of effect generally add an additional effect or terrain modifier to squares within the area. Unlike other spells and special abilities, permanent areas of effect can target any square within the spell or ability’s range; they do not have to target the nearest enemy or ally. Personal: (Spell Keyword) A spell with personal range affects only the caster. Phase Out: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Some Thayan Knight spells and special abilities take a creature off the battle grid without eliminating it. (Note the creature’s location when it is phased out; unless otherwise specified, it returns to play in that same space.) While off the grid because of being phased out, the creature cannot be affected by anything in play, but it counts as eliminated and scores victory points normally until it returns to play. A creature that has phased out still takes a turn as normal (which can be important if it is capable of returning to play). Plant: A type of creature. All Plant creatures have the following special ability: Immune Confusion, Critical Hits, Dominate, Incite, Paralysis, Poison, Sleep, Sneak Attack, Stun. Poison (EFFECT; DC [#]): When a creature is hit by an attack or subject to an effect that includes the word “Poison,” that creature must make a save against the indicated DC or be poisoned and subject to the indicated effect. Poison effects can include immediate damage (a successful save results in half damage), Paralysis, or even death. However, most Poison effects state “5 damage whenever poisoned creature activates.” Until the end of the skirmish, at the start of the poisoned creature’s turn and before it takes any actions, it takes 5 points of damage immediately. Identically worded Poison effects do not stack. Positive: (Damage Keyword) A type of damage. Positive damage is unaffected by damage reduction. Heal effects are considered to deal positive damage to Undead creatures. Positive damage has no effect on Construct creatures. Powerful Charge +[#]: A creature with this special ability deals the indicated amount of extra melee damage when it charges. Precise Shot: A creature with this special ability can make ranged attacks against an enemy that is engaged in melee without giving the target the normal +4 bonus to Armor Class. Precise Shot does not let you ignore the +4 bonus to Armor Class that a target receives from cover (including cover from a creature that is in melee with the target). Push/Pull: (Spell/Ability Effect) Certain spells or abilities push other creatures away from (or pull them toward) the creature using the spell or ability. The pushed or pulled creature cannot move into or through a space occupied by any other creature,

SKIRMISH RULES

Morale Save: A special save made to avoid routing. All morale saves have a DC of 20. A commander provides a bonus equal to its Commander rating on morale saves made by creatures under its command. A creature that fails a morale save is routing; it moves at double speed toward its exit corner until it rallies or exits the battle grid. Spells and special abilities can trigger morale saves. Creatures without the Fearless special ability make a morale save when their hit points first drop to half normal. Morale Save +[#]: Add the indicated bonus to all the creature’s morale saves. Mounted: A modifier to creature type or subtype. Certain spells, special abilities, or effects may reference mounted creatures. Mounted Melee Attack: When moving at double speed (other than making a charge), a creature with this ability can make a single melee attack at any point in its path. Mounted Ranged Attack: When moving at double speed (other than making a charge), a creature with this ability can make a single ranged attack at any point in its path. Move Action: An action that is the equivalent of a creature moving up to its speed. During its turn, a creature may replace its attack with a move action, allowing it to move up to double speed. Sometimes special actions, spells, or effects replace one or both move actions. (See also Minimum Move, above.) Nearest Enemy: The nearest enemy to a specific creature is the nearest enemy that it can see. Another enemy that is closer, but out of line of sight, does not qualify as the nearest. When rushing or charging, count the distance to the enemy taking into account any movement costs for terrain and any special movement mode of the moving creature, such as Flight or Burrow. By contrast, ranged attacks and effects ignore terrain that does not block line of sight and line of effect. (Thus, the nearest enemy when charging or rushing might not be the same as the nearest enemy for a ranged attack.) If two or more enemies are at the same distance, the acting creature can choose any of them as the nearest. Negative: (Damage Keyword) A type of damage. Negative damage is unaffected by damage reduction. Negative damage removes damage from Undead creatures and has no effect on Construct creatures. Nonliving: Constructs and Undead creatures are nonliving creatures. Not Subject to Commander Effects: A creature with this ability cannot benefit from the Commander Effects of commanders in its warband. It also ignores Commander Effects of enemy commanders that affect only enemies, such as that of the Mind Flayer. On Terrain: Generally a creature is considered to be on (or in) a piece of terrain if any part of its space occupies a square that contains that type of terrain. The exception occurs during deployment, when creatures meant to be set up on a specific terrain tile have to be placed entirely on that terrain tile. Ooze: A type of creature. All Oozes have the following special abilities: Blindsight; Fearless; Immune Confusion, Critical Hits, Dominate, Flanking, Gaze Attacks, Incite, Paralysis, Poison, Sleep, Sneak Attack, Stun.

123

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:49 AM Page 124

124

or through walls. Pushed or pulled creatures do not provoke attacks of opportunity. Push: A creature pushed away from another creature must always move into a square that is farther from the pushing creature. Pull: A creature pulled toward another creature must always move into a square that is closer to the pulling creature. If an effect states you may “push or pull,” the target can end up closer to, farther from, or the same distance from the creature producing the effect. Range 6: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A range given in the description of certain spells and abilities. The effect targets the nearest enemy or ally within 6 squares and line of sight of the originating creature. Ranged Attack: One of the two attack types (see also Melee Attack, above). A creature can’t make a ranged attack if it is in a square threatened by an enemy. Ranged Sneak Attack +[#]: This works just like Sneak Attack (see that entry, below), but the creature must be making a ranged attack within 6 squares of the target, and the defender must be either stunned, helpless, or unable to see the creature. Remove: (Spell Keyword) To negate, suppress, or cancel one or more existing effects on a creature, magic item, or area. Unless otherwise noted, removal is permanent. Rend +[#]: If a creature with this special ability hits one creature with two melee attacks on the same turn, it deals the indicated amount of extra melee damage with the second attack. Replace/Replaces: Some spells or special abilities have “replaces” as a special cost, such as “replaces attacks” or “replaces move.” When it uses the spell or ability, the creature is considered to have taken the specified action. Requires CREATURE: A fire elemental leaves if the commander it has promised to serve is killed. A creature with this ability can be included in your warband only if you also have the indicated creature in your warband. When you set up your warband, choose which creature is the required one. If the required creature is eliminated, this creature is also eliminated, and both score points for the opponent. For example, the Large Fire Elemental has the Requires Commander ability. Pick one of your commanders when you set up your warband. If that commander is eliminated, the Large Fire Elemental is also eliminated. In an Out of the Box scenario (see Warband-Building Scenarios, earlier in this chapter), if you have no creature that qualifies as the required sort, choose any one other creature in your warband instead. Reroll: Sometimes a spell or special ability allows you to make a die roll again. You may reroll the type of die specified by the spell or ability. You may not, however, reroll dice associated with a scenario setup or with a creature or object (such as a magic statue) controlled by neither player. Whenever you make a reroll, you must abide by the result of the second roll. Resist [#] ENERGY: When a creature with this special ability takes damage of the specified energy type, reduce the damage dealt by the indicated amount. Rounding: Round fractions down, unless otherwise indicated. For example, if you destroy your own Orc Warrior (3 points) in a three-way game, your two opponents split the points and get only 1 point each. Rush: An out of command creature can rush toward the nearest enemy it can see if it can reach that enemy during its turn. It moves up to double its normal speed toward that enemy and can take any path, so long as it ends its movement adjacent to that enemy. (It can even charge if it’s able to meet the conditions.)

Sacred Circle: A creature on any square containing a sacred circle gains a +2 bonus on attack rolls, and its attacks deal magic damage for as long as it remains on that square. Sacred circles have no effect on movement. Save: Numerous effects require a creature to save against a specific DC to avoid or reduce an adverse effect. Roll 1d20 and add the creature’s level, then compare the result to the save’s DC. (Some creatures get an additional bonus on saves as a special ability; see below.) If the save result equals or exceeds the DC, the save succeeds. If a spell or ability deals damage and has a DC, the effect deals half damage on a successful save. Other effects are negated with a successful save. Save +[#]: Add the indicated bonus to all this creature’s saves. Scout: Instead of placing a creature with this special ability on your assembly tile at the start of the battle, place it on a feature tile of your choice that does not already have a creature on it. If this creature enters the battle grid after the first turn, it enters like any other creature. Shot on the Run: A creature with this ability can move, make a single ranged attack, and then move again, as long as the distance it moves during its turn doesn’t exceed its speed. Sight: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A sight-range spell targets the nearest enemy or ally to which the caster has line of sight. Size: The physical dimensions of a creature or object. Miniatures sizes, from smallest to largest, are Small, Medium, Large, Huge, Gargantuan, and Colossal. Huge creatures occupy a space 3 squares on a side, Gargantuan creatures occupy a space 4 squares on a side, and Colossal creatures occupy a space 6 squares on a side. Skips Next Turn: (Spell/Ability Effect) On its next turn, a creature subject to this effect activates but may take no actions. It is still considered active. It threatens squares normally and can make attacks of opportunity. Sleep: (Spell/Ability Effect) A creature subject to this effect is sleeping. If the Sleep effect has a save DC, then a successful save negates the effect. A sleeping creature is helpless until another creature wakes it up. A creature that is adjacent to one or more sleeping creatures can remove Sleep for one sleeping creature as a standard action (replacing its attacks). Sleep effects are also removed immediately when a sleeping creature takes damage. Slide: (Spell/Ability Effect) This effect works like push/pull (see that entry), except that the movement of the affected creature can be in any direction. Slow Melee Attack: A creature with this special ability can’t move during the same turn that it makes a melee attack. Slow Ranged Attack: A creature swith this special ability can’t move during the same turn that it makes a ranged attack. Small: A Small creature has a 20 mm base and occupies 1 square. Smite TYPE OR ALIGNMENT +[#]: A creature with this special ability can deal extra damage with a melee attack against the indicated type of enemy creature or a creature with the specified alignment. The Smite attempt must be declared before making the attack. If the attack hits, it deals the indicated amount of extra damage. If no type or alignment is specified for this ability, it affects any enemy creature. Sneak Attack +[#]: A creature with this special ability gains the indicated bonus on its melee damage rolls under certain conditions: The creature must be flanking the defender, or the defender must be stunned, helpless, or unable to see the creature. Sonic: (Damage Keyword) A type of energy.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:50 AM Page 125

CHAPTER 5:

Illus. by D. Hanley

Stacking: In general, the effects produced by spells, special abilities, and even magic items stack (are cumulative) with each other, even in some cases that the roleplaying rules do not allow. However, some exceptions exist: No effect produced by a spell, special ability, or magic item stacks with itself. It’s okay for multiple spells and items to each grant melee damage +5 to a creature, but a creature can’t gain melee damage +10 from two castings of bull’s strength. Duplicate bonuses from Commander Effects never stack. A single follower can benefit from any number of Commander Effects at the same time, but if more than one grants a bonus to the same statistic, only the highest bonus applies. In addition, spells with the words “greater,” “lesser,” “legion,” “mass,” or “swift” as the first word in their title are simply derived from other spells. Their effects do not stack with the effects of their related spells. Standard Action: Making a standard action replaces a creature’s attacks on its turn. Statue: A statue hinders movement. It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing a statue (or 3 squares if moving diagonally). A creature can’t end its movement in a square containing a statue. Statues provide cover to creatures behind them, but those creatures can still be seen. Some game effects, such as the Medusa’s Gaze Attack, create new statues. If a creature transformed into a statue is returned to play, remove the statue and place the creature on the battle grid in its space. Stun: (Spell/Ability Effect) A creature subject to this effect is stunned. If the Stun effect has a save DC, then a sucUmber Hulk cessful save negates the effect. A stunned creature is not active; it can’t move, attack, threaten adjacent squares, or take standard actions, but it is not helpless. A stunned creature takes a –2 penalty to Armor Class. It stops being stunned at the end of its next turn (in other words, it loses one chance to act). A stunned commander can’t put other creatures under command or add its Commander rating to initiative checks, and its Commander Effect does not function. Stunned creatures still make morale saves, and a stunned commander can still add its own Commander rating to its morale saves if a higher-rated commander is not available to help. Stunning Attack (DC [#]): Once per turn, a creature with this special ability can make a special melee attack in an attempt to incapacitate an enemy. If the attack hits and deals damage, the damaged creature must succeed on a save against the indicated DC or be stunned (see above). The attempt must be declared before making the attack. The Stun effect ends at the end of the stunned creature’s next turn. Summon: (Spell Keyword) A summon spell (such as summon monster or summon nature’s ally) brings a creature or creatures matching specified restrictions onto the battle grid within 6 squares of the summoner. (The controlling player must provide the appropriate miniature or miniatures.) A summoned creature does not activate on the round it appears, but afterward it activates as a normal member of the warband. A summoned creature does not add to a warband’s cost, nor does it score victory points for the opponent who eliminates it. Summoned

SKIRMISH RULES

Sorcerer Spells: (Spell Keyword) A creature with this ability has a small number of spells of each level but can cast a given spell repeatedly, up to its limit for that level. The creature can use up a higher-level spell slot to cast a spell of lower level. Not all creatures that have this ability are actually of the sorcerer class. Bards, for example, have the Sorcerer Spells ability because they cast “on the fly” as sorcerers do. Space: The square or squares that a creature occupies. Speed: The number of squares a creature can move when activated. A creature that does not attack or cast a spell (or perform another standard action) can move up to double its speed on its turn. Spell Level: A number from 1 to 9 that indicates the relative power of a spell. Spell: Casting a spell is a standard action and replaces a creature’s attacks on its turn. A creature can’t cast a spell while an enemy threatens a square it occupies, except for spells with a range of touch. A spellcaster that has cover in melee against an adjacent enemy, though, can cast spells normally. The caster decides whether to target the nearest enemy or the nearest ally. Unless otherwise noted, damage and Stun effects are instantaneous. Bonuses and abilities granted by spells, and other spell effects, last for the entire skirmish or until some condition described in the spell is met. Spell Resistance: This special ability is sometimes abbreviated SR. When casting a spell that would affect a creature that has Spell Resistance, roll 1d20. On a roll of 11 or higher, the spell affects the creature normally; otherwise the spell has no effect on it. The creature may choose not to resist a spell. Spell Resistance does not provide any protection against bonuses or abilities that enemies receive from spells that have been cast on them. For example, a creature under the effect of a bull’s strength spell (touch; melee damage +5) still deals the extra damage on a melee attack that hits a creature that has Spell Resistance. Some spells (such as lesser fire orb) ignore Spell Resistance. Don’t make a Spell Resistance roll for such spells; they automatically succeed. They even affect creatures that have the Spell Resistance All ability (see below). Spell Resistance All: A creature with this special ability is never affected by a spell that allows a Spell Resistance roll, and it can’t choose not to resist a spell. Spellcaster/Caster: A creature that has a Spells entry on its stat card is a spellcaster. Spring Attack: A creature with this special ability can move, make a melee attack, and then move again, as long as the distance it moves during its turn doesn’t exceed its speed. The creature gains no special protection from attacks of opportunity caused by its movement.

125

SKIRMISH RULES

CHAPTER 5:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:50 AM Page 126

126

creatures do not count against the twelve creature limit for your warband; a warband can contain twelve creatures plus summoned creatures. Commanders cannot be summoned. A summoned creature is immediately eliminated if the creature that summoned it is eliminated. Ignore any Requires CREATURE special ability of the summoned creature. Common restrictions on the type of creature to be summoned include creature type, faction, and cost. Swift: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A creature may use one swift spell or special ability during its turn (but not during other creatures’ turns). This swift action doesn’t count against its normal actions and does not replace its attacks. A creature can take a swift action before any of its other actions, during movement, or after any of its actions during its turn. Switch Position: (Spell/Ability Effect) A few spells and special abilities cause the creature using the ability to switch positions with its target, or to switch two other creatures’ positions. If the two creatures occupy spaces of the same size, simply swap their locations on the battle grid. If the creatures occupy spaces of different sizes, they can switch positions only if the larger creature can be placed in a legal position. Each creature must end up on at least one of the squares the other creature occupied. The player who controls the effect controls the exact location, so long as it is a legal position. Being switched out of or into a square threatened by enemy creatures does not provoke attacks of opportunity. Threaten: An active creature threatens all squares adjacent to it. A creature can make an attack of opportunity against an enemy creature that moves out of a square it threatens. Spellcasters cannot cast spells (other than those with a range of touch) when they are threatened, and creatures with ranged attacks can’t use them when they are in an enemy’s threatened square. However, if the threatening creature can’t see the enemy or if the enemy has cover in melee against the threatening creature, the creature in the threatened square can move, cast a spell, or make ranged attacks normally. Tied Die Rolls: If two or more players tie on a die roll, the player with the highest bonus on the die roll wins. If two or more players are tied for the highest bonus, the tied players reroll. Touch: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A range given in the description of certain spells and abilities. A caster can cast a touchrange spell on any creature it can make a melee attack against. Spells that have a range of touch can be cast even when an enemy threatens the caster’s square. The caster may choose the target of its spell from among all the creatures it can make a melee attack against. Trample [#] (DC [#]): Once during its turn, a creature with this special ability can move through an enemy’s space. That enemy takes the indicated amount of melee damage if it fails a save against the indicated DC. A trampling creature still provokes attacks of opportunity. Trampling doesn’t replace a creature’s attacks for the turn. Turn Undead [#]: Instead of attacking or casting a spell, a creature with this special ability can attempt to turn the nearest Undead creature of the indicated level or lower. Only Undead creatures within 12 squares and to which the creature has line of sight can be affected. To resist turning, an Undead creature must make a DC 20 morale save. If the save fails, the Undead creature routs. A commander in the Undead creature’s warband can grant bonuses on this morale save and can attempt to rally the Undead creature. Tyrannical Morale +[#]: (Commander Effect) If you wish, a commander that has this effect can give a follower within 6

squares an additional bonus on its morale save equal to the given number. However, if the save fails, that creature is destroyed instead of routing. The opponent whose creature triggered the morale save or originally caused the creature to rout receives victory points for eliminating the creature. Uncanny Dodge: When a creature with this special ability is active, it has the following special ability: Immune Flanking, Sneak Attack. Undead: A type of creature. All Undead creatures have the following special abilities: Fearless; Immune Confusion, Critical Hits, Dominate, Incite, Paralysis, Poison, Sleep, Sneak Attack, Stun. Heal effects, such as the various cure wounds spells, deal positive damage to Undead creatures. Unique: A creature with this special ability is one of a kind and has a given name, such as Tordek, Dwarf Fighter. A Unique creature is sometimes referred to as a character. You cannot have more than one Unique creature with the same given name in your warband. For example, Tordek, Dwarf Fighter and Tordek, Dwarf Champion both count as “Tordek”; you can have only one or the other in your warband. Each of your opponents and teammates can have their own copy of a Unique creature. Ignore the Unique ability’s warband building restrictions in Out of the Box games (see Warband-Building Scenarios, earlier in this chapter). Unlimited Uses: Most spells can only be used a few times, as indicated by one or more check boxes (❑). Spells with unlimited uses can be cast by a creature any number of times. Special abilities that have no check boxes are assumed to have unlimited uses. Vermin: A type of creature. All Vermin creatures have the following special ability: Immune Confusion, Dominate, Incite, Sleep. Vulnerable DAMAGE TYPE: For every 10 points of the specified energy damage dealt to this creature, it takes an extra 5 points of that same damage. For example, a creature with Vulnerable Fire that takes 5 points of fire damage takes no further damage. If that creature instead takes 15 points of fire damage, it takes an extra 5 points, for a total of 20 points of fire damage. If the creature gets a save to reduce the damage, roll the save first. Base any damage increase on the damage dealt after the save. Wall: Walls and other areas of solid stone block movement and line of sight. A creature can’t move or make a ranged attack through a wall. It also can’t move diagonally past a corner or the end of a wall. Count around walls to see if commanders are close enough to influence the creatures in their warband. Wandering Monster: Instead of placing a creature with this special ability on your assembly tile at the start of the battle, place it on a random feature tile. If this creature enters the battle grid after the first turn, it enters like any other creature. Warband Building: (Commander Effect) Adding a creature with this special ability to your warband allows you to break one or more of the usual warband construction rules, as indicated after the ability name. Usually, this ability allows you to ignore alignment restrictions for a certain type of creature. Wounded: A creature that has taken damage, reducing its hit points below its starting amount, is said to be wounded. Your Warband: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A range given in the description of certain spells and abilities. A spell of this sort affects all creatures in your warband, no matter where they are. (In special scenarios, it even affects creatures that are not yet in play.)

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:50 AM Page 127

Illus. by D. Hanley

hundred orcs bear down on the stalwart elf archers. Though outnumbered two to one, the elves vow to fight to the last. If they can hold off the advance units long enough, elf rangers in the hundreds will arrive to quickly dispatch the orc forces. But the reinforcements are late to the field; it is up to the archers for now. With a clash of steel and a twang of bowstrings, the battle is joined! Skirmish rules are not enough to manage a conflict involving dozens or hundreds of creatures. These mass battles rules are designed to allow large-scale battles using D&D miniatures. You play mass battles on a tabletop or a large, flat surface (such as an area of floor), with movement and distances measured in inches. (Little tape measures are a big help.) Mass battles take longer to set up and play than skirmishes, so they’re better suited to big, long-lasting slugfests than to quick matches. Since it’s harder to build a large army than a skirmish warband, feel free to adapt the following rules and victory conditions to fit the armies you have available.

MASS BATTLES BASICS

Browse this section to get familiar with basic terms, then jump to the in-depth rules that follow.

ROUNDS A mass battle is played in rounds. Begin the round by making an initiative check. In each round, players complete phases in order. During each phase in which you act, you activate one, two, or three units in your army; one unit takes all its actions, then the next does so. (You can activate a particular unit only once in a round.)

Rounds in a mass battle are different from rounds in a skirmish. Each round represents 6 seconds on the battlefield (the same as a round in the D&D roleplaying game). During each phase in which you act, you activate one or more units in your army. (You can activate a unit only once in a round.) A round ends when all players have activated all their units once. Then a new round begins.

Initiative Each army makes an initiative check before each round of combat. Unlike in the skirmish rules, this check is an unmodified 1d20 roll. The player of the army that wins initiative decides which side goes first.

Phases Rounds are subdivided into phases to help manage the conflict. Each army has one or more phases during a round. When one player takes all the actions allowed for a phase, the next player then completes a phase. Each player completes phases in play order until all units have been activated. Actions occurring during a specific unit’s activation are referred to as that unit’s turn.

UNITS In a mass battle, creatures are collected into groups called units. Even a creature all by itself is treated as a unit, although the rules for lone creatures

127

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:51 AM Page 128

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

are slightly different. Units can be formed, with creatures marching in tight ranks and working closely together, or unformed, with less discipline but more ability to maneuver on the battlefield. Trays: To let players move many miniatures at once, units are often assembled on “trays” made of pieces of cardboard or stiff paper. Cut-up file folders work well for this purpose. The back of this book includes several examples of trays, which you can photocopy, cut out, and glue onto cardboard.

Activation During each phase in the round, you activate up to three units of your army, one at a time. An activated unit can perform one of the following activities. —Move its speed and then make one attack, or make one attack and then move. —Move up to double its speed. —Not move and make multiple attacks, if it can do so. —Charge. Instead of making an attack, a unit or lone creature can cast a spell or use a special ability, such as Turn Undead.

Cleric of Yondalla

Illus. by D. Hanley

Movement Each unit has a speed rating, measured in inches. A unit that moves up to its speed can make one attack or perform a standard action. It can move first and then attack, or attack first and then move. A unit that doesn’t do anything else can move up to double speed on a turn. For example, an unformed Wood Elf Skirmisher unit has a speed of 6. If the unit only moves, or if it charges, it can move up to 12 inches. If it makes a single attack, it can move up to 6 inches (either before or after the attack). If the unit makes both of its ranged attacks, it can’t move at all.

ATTACKING When a unit attacks, one or more creatures in it attack at the same time. All eligible creatures in the unit make their attack rolls simultaneously. Each rolls 1d20 and adds the creature’s melee attack number, and any other modifiers that apply (see Table 6–4: Combat Modifiers). If the result of an attack roll equals or exceeds the defending unit’s Armor Class, the attack hits. Each attacking creature that gets a hit deals its damage. The defending unit’s hit point rating is equal to the rating of any single creature that is a part of the unit. The defending unit removes one miniature for each amount of damage it takes equal to its hit point rating; this removal of a miniature is referred to as taking a casualty. Any leftover damage is accounted for the next time the unit is attacked. For example, a Wood Elf Skirmisher unit deals 5 points of damage per hit. If it lands five hits on a Gnoll unit, it deals 25 points of damage. Since each Gnoll has 10 hit points, that’s enough damage to cause two casualties. The defending player removes two Gnoll miniatures from that unit. The remaining 5 points of damage is carried over. If the Wood Elf Skirmisher unit attacks the Gnoll unit again and deals another 25 points of damage, three more Gnoll miniatures become casualties because the total amount of damage to be accounted for is 30 points.

MORALE

128

Damage, and the effects of some special abilities and spells, can make units less willing to fight. An affected unit makes a morale save. Roll 1d20 and add the unit’s level (equal to the level of any single creature that is a

part of the unit). If the save result equals or exceeds 20, the save succeeds. Failed morale saves indicate a drop in the unit’s morale state. Units start out in a normal state, which allows them to maneuver and attack with no restrictions due to morale. A unit that fails one morale save becomes shaken (less willing to fight, takes penalties). A shaken unit that fails a morale save routs (attempts to flee from the field). Commanders can rally units to improve their morale.

COMMANDERS Commanders spend command points to activate units and to issue special orders. A commander has a number of command points available in each round equal to the creature’s Commander rating. Commanders can attach to units to protect themselves and help the units. They can lead a unit from the front (and take part in combat) or from the rear (avoiding combat).

SETUP

These are the standard rules for preparing to play a mass battle.

PLAYERS Two or more players can play. Each player can have an army, or each army can be shared by two or more players. If each player has an army, you can play a free-for-all or arrange the players in teams.

BATTLEFIELD Mass battles, by default, are fought aboveground, usually in a mostly open area. Some underground areas might be large enough to accommodate a mass batgtle, though, and you might want to try battles in such an environment as well.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:51 AM Page 129

A large table (or a clear area on the floor) at least 6 feet by 4 feet is ideal. At the scale of 1 inch = 5 feet, this represents a battlefield of 360 feet by 240 feet. Unlike in the skirmish rules, the edges of the battlefield are not impassable. If only two players are involved, each takes a position along one of the long edges of the battlefield. More players can spread out around the perimeter in a free-for-all or line up opposite one another to form teams. Each player should station himself or herself at a point equidistant from the others. If more than four players are involved, increase the size of the battlefield to 8 feet by 4 feet.

Army Point Total Building armies for a mass battle costs a lot more than creating warbands for a skirmish. The size of the army depends on how long you want the battle to last. Small Battle: 500 points. Medium Battle: 1,000 points. Epic Battle: 3,000 points or more.

Number of Creatures

The simplest terrain (and the default battlefield) is a flat, featureless plain without lakes, rivers, buildings, trees, or hills. What little vegetation there may be doesn’t affect the movement of troops. However, adding interesting terrain is part of the fun of mass battles, challenging players to maneuver their armies over and around the landscape. The type of terrain you place on the battlefield modifies the way combat works. Rules for various types of terrain are given later in this chapter. You can photocopy the sample terrain features at the back of this book, cut them out, and tape them down to the play area. Taping the pieces down is important—otherwise, they might get moved around on the surface (not something trees and walls are noted for!). You can also draw your own terrain features, inventing whatever you like. Some people use three-dimensional facsimiles of terrain, which they make themselves or purchase from hobby stores. Since terrain can give an advantage to one army or another, you need to be fair when you place it. The best method for generating a landscape that both sides are happy with is for one player to lay out the terrain and the other to choose which side of the battlefield he or she will start on. Both players decide ahead of time what sorts of terrain to use and how much. Placing Terrain: There are only two rules for placing terrain. No piece of impassable terrain can be within 2 inches of another piece of impassable terrain, nor can one be within 2 inches of the battlefield edge.

BUILDING ARMIES Each player chooses creatures to make up his or her army. Follow the same directions as for building a warband in the skirmish rules, with the following exceptions.

Purchasing Units Creatures other than commanders are purchased as part of units. The minimum number of creatures in a unit depends on whether the unit is formed or unformed and on what size the creatures are, as shown in Table 6–1. A unit always contains identical creatures. If you have more than one unit made up of the same kind of creature, be sure to note how many creatures each unit started with so you can tell when a unit reaches half casualties (see Morale). For example, you could purchase two Gnoll units, one containing six creatures and another containing nine.

CHAPTER 6:

Terrain

MASS BATTLE RULES

Unlike in the skirmish rules, there is no upper limit to the number of creatures you can have in an army.

Table 6–1: Minimum Creatures in a Unit Creature Size Small Medium Large

Formed 6 (one rank) 5 (one rank) 3 (one rank)

Unformed 1 1 1

Many creatures (such as Magical Beasts) can only be in unformed units, while some can be in either type of unit. If you are purchasing creatures of the second sort, you don’t have to decide right away what type of unit to build. As long you have enough creatures to fill at least one rank of a formed unit, and no more than the maximum number of creatures allowed in an unformed unit (see Table 6–3), then you can deploy the unit either as formed or unformed, as you see fit. For example, you purchase a Gnoll unit containing nine creatures (the maximum allowed in an unformed unit of Medium creatures). Humanoids can be in either formed or unformed units, and only five Medium creatures are required to form a rank. You see that your opponent is deploying an Elf Archer unit.

pqqqqrs EXAMPLE ARMIES Here are two sample small armies using creatures from the Harbinger™ set. The first army belongs to the Lawful Good faction, and the second to the Chaotic Evil faction. # 1 2 2 1 1 8 6 6 12

Creature Sword of Heironeous Cleric of Order Cleric of Yondalla Hound Archon Ember, Human Monk Dwarf Axefighter Halfling Veteran Sun Soul Initiate Man-at-Arms

Command Cmdr 7 Cmdr 5 Cmdr 3

Cost 49* 44* 34* 31 18 12 11 8 3

Total 49 88 68 31 18 96 66 48 36 500

# 2 1 1 6 11 5 5 12 12

Creature Tiefling Captain Cleric of Gruumsh Minotaur Drow Archer Wolf Skeleton Orc Archer Orc Berserker Orc Spearfighter Orc Warrior

Command Cmdr 4 Cmdr 3

Cost 41* 41* 17 14 9 8 8 5 3

Total 82 41 17 84 99 40 40 60 36 499 *Includes an additional 20 points for mass battles commanders.

pqqqqrs

129

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 11:51 AM Page 130

1 foot

Mass Battlefield

In response, you can deploy the Gnoll unit unformed so that it better withstands ranged attacks.

1 foot

Commanders Add 20 points to the printed cost of each commander you purchase. Commanders are more powerful in mass battles than they are in skirmishes because they command more creatures. You can spend up to 20% of your points on multiples of a particular miniature (for example, up to 200 points in a 1,000-point army). A 1,000-point army could have no more than six Hound Archons (31 points each). Include the 20-point additional cost for commanders when determining the points for multiples of a given commander miniature.

MASS BATTLE RULES

VICTORY CONDITIONS

6 feet

CHAPTER 6:

Maximum Points by Miniature

After deciding on the size of the armies and designing the armies, choose victory conditions. These set the rules for winning a battle.

Illus. by S. Tappin

DEPLOYING FORCES

4 feet

After choosing starting locations and deciding on victory conditions, players deploy their armies. Each player rolls 1d20. Whoever rolls highest decides which player deploys a unit first. The order of play passes to the left. If there’s a tie, the tied players reroll. The player who deploys first places all his or her units on the battlefield within his or her deployment zone (see below). Commanders attached to units are deployed at the same time the units are deployed. Then the next player places his or her units, and so on, until all units are placed.

Deploying Commanders

formed melee unit unformed melee unit unformed ranged unit

When you deploy a unit, you may deploy an attached commander with it. The only way for a commander to start the battle attached to a unit is to be deployed with it in this way. Determine whether each attached commander is leading from the front or from the rear. (See Commanders for more information about commanders and what it means to be attached to units.) If it’s your turn to deploy and you have deployed all your units, you now deploy all your unattached commanders, one at a time. A player is done once he or she has deployed all units and unattached commanders.

lone creature commander Two armies deploy on opposite sides of the battlefield. The army on the left has one heavy melee unit (formed) backed up by two ranged units. Skirmishers (unformed melee units) are set up to protect the ranged units and to threaten formed units from the sides, and a big lone creature serves as a shock troop. The army on the right has three formed melee units, with skirmishers to screen them against ranged attacks and to prevent them from being attacked from the sides.

130

Goblin Sneak

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:07 PM Page 131

Deployment Zone In a two-player battle, you each deploy your army’s units within 12 inches (1 foot) of your starting point along the battlefield edge and no closer than 12 inches to either of the short edges. (If using a smaller play area, players deploy units only within 6 inches of their starting points.) In a multiplayer free-for-all, players set up along the sides as well, spacing themselves evenly around the perimeter.

ROUND SEQUENCE

Units

Unformed Unit no facing

side

side

Formed Unit front

rear Formed Unit: This formed unit of Medium creatures is on the standard 5-inch tray. It has four ranks, so the unit takes up a space 5 inches wide and 4 inches deep. Unformed Unit: This unformed unit of Medium creatures is also on the standard 5-inch tray. Its space is 5 inches wide and 3 inches deep. Unformed units have no facing. Trays: A tray is merely a convenience to make it easier to arrange and move troops. A tray has no direct effect on the battlefield. You can make shallower trays for shallower units, if you like. Creature Size: Large and Small creatures also use the standard 5-inch tray, fitting fewer or more creatures into a unit, respectively.

Illegal Units

Formed unit with five Medium creatures in its front rank.

Formed unit with four Medium creatures in its front rank.

Unformed unit with creatures aligned against a leading edge.

Unformed unit with creatures not aligned against a leading edge.

Unformed unit with two creatures as near as possible to each other.

CHAPTER 6:

UNITS

Armies are composed of creatures. Every miniature represents an individual combatant, and these creatures are grouped into units. A unit is always composed of miniatures that have the same name (although a commander may be attached). Therefore, the members of a given unit have the same characteristics, including attacks, Armor Class, creature type, and so on.

Legal Units

MASS BATTLE RULES

Once the battlefield is set and units are deployed, the time for battle is at hand. Follow the round sequence summarized below. 1. Initiative: Each player rolls 1d20 to see who goes first. 2. Determine Number of Phases: Largest number of units divided by 3. 3. Activate Units: Each player completes a phase, in order of play. On each phase, a player can activate up to three units. No unit can be activated more than once in a round. Activated units can move, move and attack, charge, rally, or take some other action. Damaged units may be eliminated or forced to make morale saves. 4. End of the Round: Go back to step 1 to begin a new round. Play continues until victory conditions are met. Let the best army win!

Legal and Illegal Units

Unformed unit with two creatures not as near as possible to each other.

In mass battles rules, creatures do not fight as individuals; they form coherent units that may be led by commanders. A unit maneuvers as a single entity. Formed units consist of miniatures organized into one or more ranks. They are powerful when they attack head on, but they are slow and are vulnerable to attacks from the side and rear. Unformed units are less powerful in a head-on fight and more likely to break and run, but they’re faster and more maneuverable than formed units. You decide whether a unit is formed or unformed when you deploy it on the battlefield, and you can’t voluntarily change its state afterward.

TRAYS For ease of play, you can place miniatures in a unit on a tray. A tray measures 5 inches by 5 inches. The appendix provides three examples you can use. No matter what type of creatures you are fielding, and whether they are in formed or unformed units, the miniatures in any given unit must fit on the standard tray. Even if you don’t use physical trays, the miniatures in a unit must fit into a space that the tray would cover. A tray is a convenience and doesn’t represent a physical object. Thus, if a unit doesn’t completely fill a tray, the empty portion of the tray doesn’t block movement of other units, doesn’t block line of sight or line of effect, and doesn’t prevent an enemy unit from attacking another unit’s side. (The tray of the attacking unit can overlap the unfilled portion of the defending unit’s tray.)

FORMED UNITS A formed unit has at least one rank of creatures (a number of miniatures arranged side by side in a row) and possibly several. When a formed unit takes enough casualties that it can no longer support a single rank, it becomes unformed. A single line of creatures at right angles to a rank is referred to as a file.

131

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:07 PM Page 132

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

Number of Creatures in a Formed Unit To qualify as formed, a unit must have at least one rank, and as many creatures in its front rank as will fit across the front of the standard tray (5 inches). Likewise, a formed unit can have no more ranks than fit the depth of the standard tray (5 inches). Medium creatures use miniatures with a base 25 mm (roughly 1 inch) in diameter, so a formed unit of Medium creatures must contain a minimum of five miniatures (one rank) and a maximum of twenty-five miniatures (five full ranks). Table 6–2 below gives the minimum numbers of creatures in a rank and a formed unit. The tray templates at the back of this book show formed units of Small, Medium, and Large units. Creatures that are Tiny or smaller do not generally take part in mass battles. Those that are Huge or larger are always lone creatures rather than being parts of units. Formed units enjoy a bonus on morale saves, depending on how many ranks they contain (see Morale). Each rank after the first must contain at least one creature, and a new rank cannot be formed until the previous rank is filled. For example, one to four Medium creatures are not enough for a single rank, five form one rank, six to ten form two ranks, and so on.

Table 6–2: Creatures in Formed Units

Illus. by S. Tappin

Creature Size Small Medium Large

Minimum Creatures In 1st Rank 6 5 3

Maximum Ranks 6 5 3

Maximum Creatures 36 25 9

Facing A formed unit has a distinct facing, which is important for determining modifiers to attacks and morale saves. It has a front (defined by the creatures in its first rank), two sides, and a rear. Formed units gain a bonus on attacks and Armor Class when fighting enemy units to the front but are at a disadvantage when fighting units to a side or the rear.

Incomplete Ranks Creatures in an incomplete back rank can freely move from one side of the unit to the other. For instance, if a unit has four complete

ranks and an incomplete fifth rank with two creatures in it, then the creatures in the incomplete rank can move to either side as needed to defend. If the unit is attacked on both sides, one creature can move to the left and the other to the right, allowing five creatures to fight on each side.

Becoming Unformed As creatures are destroyed in battle, you remove them from a unit. When a unit loses so many creatures that it no longer has a complete first rank, the unit changes state from formed to unformed. Any time a unit becomes unformed, it must immediately make a morale save (see Morale).

Creatures That Can’t Be in Formed Units Only Humanoids, Monstrous Humanoids, and Undead creatures based on Humanoids or Monstrous Humanoids can be part of a formed unit. (When in doubt, look at the D&D Quick Reference side of the stat card to determine what type an Undead creature is based on; for example, the Zombie is based on a human commoner.) Creatures of other types can only take the field as unformed units. Some sorts of creatures can never be in formed units even if they are of the types mentioned above. A commander can’t be in a formed unit because it is trained to operate freely, not to work shoulder-to-shoulder with other creatures. In fact, a commander can’t be in an unformed unit that contains more than one creature. A commander can be a lone creature, or it can be attached to a unit. Creatures with player character classes or prestige classes can’t be in a formed unit because they tend to be individualistic adventurers. They excel at fighting on their own terms, usually with a small band of versatile peers. They don’t drill in formation the way members of an army do. (The D&D Quick Reference side of the stat card tells you what classes a creature has.) Troops with unlimited ranged attacks can’t be in a formed unit—they always fight in open formation (as unformed units) so they have room to aim and use their bows or other ranged weapons.

UNFORMED UNITS Unformed units have no standard order and do not contain ranks. They are faster and more maneuverable than formed units but not as capable in combat.

Number of Creatures in an Unformed Unit Unformed units, with their loose organization, have fewer creatures than formed units. An unformed unit could consist of just one creature (though a few special rules apply; see Lone Creatures, below). Unlike a formed unit, an unformed unit doesn’t snugly fill a standard tray (or a portion thereof ). Creatures in an unformed unit are spaced out loosely on the tray, as shown in the accompanying diagram. Table 6–3 below gives the minimum numbers of creatures in an unformed unit. The templates at the back of this book show unformed units of Small, Medium, and Large units.

Table 6–3: Creatures in Unformed Units

Sun Soul Initiate

132

Creature Size Small Medium Large

Minimum Creatures 1 1 1

Maximum Creatures 16 9 4

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:08 PM Page 133

Facing

CHAPTER 6:

MASS BATTLE RULES Illus. by D. Hanley

A ranged unit may ignore lone creatures when attacking the nearest unit, and lone creatures do not provide cover in melee to An unformed unit does not have facing as a formed unit does. It units behind them. has no front, sides, or rear. A commander can’t attach to a lone creature. An unformed unit does not gain bonuses on morale saves for Damage to a lone creature reduces its hit points. As in the skirmultiple ranks, nor bonuses to attacks and Armor Class when mish rules, a lone creature must attempt a morale save when its fighting an enemy to its front (in effect, it has no front). On the hit point total first drops to one-half or less of its starting amount, other hand, it also doesn’t take penalties for being attacked on the and it routs if the save fails. A lone creature doesn’t make morale sides or rear (since it has neither). saves for the same reasons that normal units do, nor does it apply Nevertheless, an unformed unit does have a leading edge, unit modifiers to morale saves. which important for measuring distances and for controlling movement. At the end of an unformed unit’s turn, all creatures in it have to be as close as possible to one of the tray’s four edges. UNIT SPACE That edge then becomes the leading edge of that unit. This The space that a unit takes up is equal to its greatest width and arrangement of miniatures resembles the ranks of a formed unit, depth, depending on the number of creatures in it and but the creatures in an unformed unit can rearrange to establish whether it is formed or unformed. An enemy contacts a different leading edge in each round. a unit at the border of that space, regardFor example, three Medium crealess of the actual location of the miniatures in an unformed unit end their tures within the unit. Wild Elf Barbarian turn as close as possible to one edge Each rank in a formed unit is 5 inches wide, of the tray, forming a line of three even if it is incomplete. For example, a formed facing out along that leading Orc Warrior unit containing eleven creatures edge. If another unit athas two complete ranks of five creatures each tacks “from the side” (that and an incomplete third rank containing one is, not against the leading creature. It takes up a space 5 inches wide and edge), then on the unformed 3 inches deep. unit’s turn these creatures In an unformed unit, the width is equal to the can rearrange themselves in a width of the leading edge (usuline that directly opposes the ally 5 inches) and the depth is creatures in the enemy unit, the total of the creatures thus allowing all of the creaand intervening spaces. For tures in the unformed unit example, an unformed Elf to attack. Archer unit containing four If there aren’t enough creatures would be 5 inches creatures in an unformed wide and 3 inches deep (1 unit to fill an edge (two inch for the leading edge of Medium creatures or two three creatures, 1 inch for the to three Small creatures), intervening spaces, and 1 inch then those creatures line for the fourth creature.) up as near as possible to each other along the leading edge, with If an unformed unit has only one gap between them, as shown in the diagram labeled very few miniatures in it, it is Legal and Illegal Units. less than 5 inches wide. For instance, an unformed unit with two Medium miniatures in it would be 3 inches wide: 2 inches for the two miniatures, plus a 1-inch gap between them. Lone Creatures When measuring between one unit and another, measure A unit may contain only one creature, either because it was conbetween the nearest points of each unit’s space. structed that way or because of ill fortune on the battlefield. Unattached commanders are also lone creatures. Lone creatures are generally treated as unformed units but are subject to a few INITIATIVE special rules. At the beginning of each round, each side rolls 1d20 to deterLone creatures activate as normal units do, though commandmine initiative. The details of winning and challenging initiaers still activate freely. tive depend on whether you’re playing a two-player or A lone creature is easily overwhelmed. Twice as many creamultiplayer battle. tures in a formed unit as usual can make melee attack rolls against a lone creature (but not more than the number of crea- Two-Player Initiative tures in the unit). Whoever has the higher roll wins. Ties are rerolled.

pqqqqrs SQUAD-LEVEL MASS BATTLES If you want a faster, leaner, more free-wheeling fight, use these alternative rules. No Formed Units: Formed units aren’t legal. Unformed units are called squads. (The battle plays faster if units don’t have facing.) No Trays: Without formed units, you can probably do without trays.

Just bunch together creatures in a squad. Still, the normal rules for unit combat apply, such as number of attackers, damage, and casualties. Smaller Armies: Since your units usually have fewer creatures in them, squad-level battles work better with a lower point cost. Try 300 to 1,000 points instead of 500 to 3,000 points.

pqqqqrs

133

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:08 PM Page 134

MASS BATTLE RULES Illus. by S. Tappin

CHAPTER 6:

If you lose the roll, you may challenge initiative by having a commander spend 1 command point (see Commanders). You then can reroll your initiative roll. If the result of the second roll is equal to or less than your opponent’s, you lose initiative and can’t challenge it again in this round. If the second roll is higher than your opponent’s roll, you win, but your opponent now has the option to challenge initiative. (If your opponent wins, you can challenge it again, and so on.) Whoever finally wins initiative determines who takes the first phase.

Multiplayer Initiative With more than two players, the sequence for challenging initiative goes like this:. 1. All players roll for initiative. If any two players tie, all players reroll. 2. Each player, starting with the lowest roller and going up, decides whether to challenge initiative, at a cost of 1 command point. A player who decides to do so must make the challenge immediately (no waiting to see what other players decide). 3. A player who rerolls and doesn’t beat the highest initiative roll is out of the running and can no longer challenge initiative. 4. A player who rerolls and beats the highest initiative roll takes the lead. The next player in order now decides whether to challenge this result. If all players have had at least one chance to challenge initiative, a player who previously made a successful challenge but is not in the lead can decide to challenge again. Repeat steps 2 through 4 until all challenges have been resolved. 5. Whoever finally wins initiative determines which player takes the first phase.

PHASES Determine the number of phases for each player at the beginning of each new round of combat. The player whose army contains the most units divides the total of his or her units by 3, rounding up. The result is the number of phases for that round. Each player has the same number of phases. For example, if the player with the most units has seven units, each player has three phases (7 divided by 3, rounded up, is 3). You divide the number of units by 3 because you can activate up to three units in a phase. This way, there are enough phases in each round that the player with the most units can activate each of those units once during the round. When determining the number of units on a side, disregard commanders. They activate freely, so they don’t count when determining the number of phases in a round. However, lone creatures that aren’t commanders do count as units (since they activate normally).

ACTIVATING UNITS Players complete phases in order, activating up to three units in each phase.

Phases and Activation

134

On each phase, you may activate up to three units. You don’t have to activate all three (or even activate any at all), but you have to activate each unit before the end of the round. A unit can’t activate more than once in a round. For example, if you have seven units and there are three phases, you could activate three in the first phase, three in the second, and the last one in the third. Alternatively, you could activate one in the first phase, then three, and finally the last

Tiefling Captain

three. Or two in the first, three in the second, and two in the last. Any combination is possible as long as you activate all your units once during the round. You have to activate enough units in a phase to avoid leaving units unactivated later. For example, if you have seven units and three phases in the round, you must activate at least one unit on the first phase. (That way, you can activate all your remaining units in the next two phases.) A commander attached to a unit activates when its unit does. You can activate any number of unattached commanders freely on your phase (before, during, or after you activate other units). You can even activate unattached commanders during a phase when you activate no other units. See Commanders for more information.

Units Under Command When you activate a unit, a commander spends 1 command point (or sometimes more) to put it under command. A unit that is under command can perform one of the following activities. —Move its speed and then make one attack, or make one attack and then move. —Move up to double its speed. —Not move and make multiple attacks, if it can do so. —Charge. Instead of making its attacks, a unit can take a standard action to cast a spell or use a special ability, such as Gaze Attack. When a unit is activated, it takes all the actions it is allowed immediately; it can’t wait for a later part of the round. A commander must be within command range to put a unit under command. A commander’s command range depends on whether it’s attached and (if it’s attached) whether it’s leading from the front or rear. When you activate a commander, no one has to spend command points for it to act.

Units Out of Command If you activate a unit (other than a commander) without having a commander spend command points to do so, it is out of command. A unit that is out of command has limited options. It can only take one of the following compulsory actions. Rout: If the unit is routing, it continues to rout (see Morale).

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:08 PM Page 135

Pivoting

Sun Soul Initiate unit

Commanders and Actions Commanders never require command points, not even their own, to act. They are never forced to take compulsory actions.

Orc Warrior unit

MOVEMENT

CHAPTER 6:

6 inches

MASS BATTLE RULES

Attack: If the unit isn’t routing and engages one or more enemy units, it must make all melee attacks it’s allowed against those units. It also must shift as much as it is able (up to 1 inch) to be in contact with the maximum number of enemy creatures. (See Movement, below, for detailed rules on shifting.) Shoot: If the unit isn’t routing, isn’t engaged, and can make a ranged attack at the nearest enemy unit, it does so. Stand: If the unit isn’t routing and can’t attack an enemy unit from its current location, it must stand. However, a standing unit can adjust its position slightly. A formed unit may move forward up to 1 inch, pivot freely, or move backward up to 1/2 inch. An unformed unit may move up to 1 inch in any direction. A standing unit may not attack, even if this movement puts it in a location where normally it could attack.

Not wanting to be attacked on its side, and unable to maneuver sideways to engage the enemy head-on, the formed Orc Warrior unit pivots to face the Sun Soul Initiate unit. The far corner of the unit moves 6 inches, and since the Orc unit’s speed is 6, this is a single move. The unit can now move again.

Armies can’t clash until they move close enough to each other to unleash their attacks. A unit can move and then attack, attack and then move, or move at double speed if it takes no other actions (or if it charges). All intended moves can be premeasured. You don’t have to estimate distances before deciding what actions to take.

FORMED UNIT MOVEMENT A formed unit moves straight ahead unless it takes a special move option: drift, pivot, or back up.

Drift Any time a formed unit moves straight ahead more than its speed (such as by making a double move or a charge), it can drift, ending its move up to 1 inch to the left or right of the path. Drift does not count against the unit’s movement capacity. It represents the unit moving in a straight line but veering off at a slight angle rather than directly forward. For convenience, simply move the unit 1 inch sideways at any point in its path (but only once).

Pivot A formed unit can pivot, wheeling around one of its front corners to change direction. To pivot, choose either front corner as the center of the pivot, then swing the unit’s front forward around the pivot point, as shown in the diagram. Determine the distance moved in a pivot by measuring the line traced by the corner of the unit’s space that is most distant from the pivot point. This distance counts against the unit’s movement for that turn. Once the pivot is completed, the unit can continue its movement, with its new facing, to the limit allowed by its speed. A unit may pivot more than once, as long as it has enough movement remaining to do so.

Back Up A formed unit may back up instead of moving forward. Backing up works the same as moving forward, except that it costs twice as much as moving forward. A formed unit can’t drift while backing up, because even with a double move it can’t move farther than its speed. A formed unit can’t pivot while backing up, because a pivot is made around a front corner.

UNFORMED UNIT MOVEMENT Unformed units have no facing and so can move in any direction. Thus, they do not need to drift or back up as a special maneuver.

Pivot An unformed unit can pivot around any point. Determine the distance moved by measuring the line traced by the corner of the unit’s space that is most distant from the pivot point. This distance counts against the unit’s movement for that turn. Unformed units don’t need to pivot as often as formed units do because they have no facing. This means they can move sideways or even diagonally without pivoting first.

MOVING AND FRIENDLY UNITS A formed unit cannot move through a friendly unit unless the friendly unit is an unattached commander. No unit other than an unattached commander can move through a formed unit. An unformed unit can move freely through another friendly unformed unit, but it cannot end its move overlapping the space occupied by the other unit. Even lone creatures can’t move through formed units, nor can a formed unit move through a lone creature. However, unattached commanders can move through friendly formed units. As with two unformed units, however, the unattached commander and the formed unit can’t end a turn occupying the same space.

MOVING AND ENEMY UNITS A unit can never move through an enemy unit, but it can move to enter melee combat with an enemy. Doing this involves three basic steps. First, the unit moves until it touches the enemy unit. Second, if the units aren’t lined up edge to edge, the moving unit swings around until they are lined up.

135

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:08 PM Page 136

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

Man-at-Arms

attack. This follows the normal rules for melee contact (see Attacks and Damage, below), but if the enemy unit is formed, only one rank of creatures in it can attack. Each creature that does so can make only a single attack roll as part of the attack of opportunity. If the moving unit converges, this attack happens after the pivot. A moving unit avoids this attack if it has a Melee Reach rating at least as high as that of the defending unit. Unlike in the skirmish rules, a unit with Melee Reach does not fight at a distance. Even if both units have Melee Reach, the moving unit converges to bring its edge flush against the other’s edge.

CHARGE Any unit may charge the nearest enemy unit to cover more ground and attack at an advantage.

Illus. by S. Tappin

Movement

Third, the moving unit makes a melee attack (if the movement was part of a charge, or if the unit has moved its speed or less).

Engaging A moving unit must stop when any part of it touches any part of an enemy unit. It now engages the enemy.

Converging Once a unit has moved to engage an enemy unit, it must converge with that unit. Converging means pivoting to line up edge to edge with the enemy unit. (If the units are already edge to edge, the moving unit obviously doesn’t have to converge.) The converging unit must pivot in one direction or the other, depending on which edge is closer to the enemy unit. If two edges are equally close, the acting player chooses. Converging doesn’t count as part of a unit’s movement. Normally a formed unit can only pivot forward around a front corner. These restrictions don’t apply to converging. (A formed unit that is converging pivots around the point of contact.) A unit that starts its turn engaging an enemy unit at an angle must either converge or disengage (see below). However, it cannot converge if doing so would cause it to disengage from another enemy unit.

Melee Attack If the converging unit has completed a charge or has moved its speed or less, it can now make a single melee attack against the enemy unit. (If creatures in the converging unit have multiple melee attacks, they can make only one set of melee attack rolls.)

Engaging an Enemy with Melee Reach

136

To charge, a unit moves toward the nearest enemy unit it can see. If two or more enemy units are equally near, the attacking unit’s player chooses which one to charge. A charging unit can move up to double speed and must be able to move at least 2 inches before making its attack. A charging unit must move in a straight line (although it can drift). If any line traced between the unit’s starting and ending positions passes through terrain that slows or prevents movement, or terrain that contains a unit (even a friendly one or a lone creature), the charge is not allowed. When the charging unit engages the enemy unit, it makes a single set of melee melee attack rolls (also known as a mass strike) with a +2 bonus. A unit with multiple melee attacks can use only one of these on a charge. A formed unit can charge forward (which can include drifting), but it can’t pivot or move backward as part of a charge. An

If a unit moves to engage an enemy unit that has the Melee Reach special ability, the enemy unit can immediately make an attack of opportunity against it before the moving unit can

Charging

Man-at-Arms unit

Orc Warrior unit

1 inch When a formed unit moves forward more than its speed, it may drift 1 inch to the left or right at any point in the move. This additional movement doesn’t count against the unit’s movement capacity. If the formed unit is charging, it must drift if doing so brings more of the unit into melee contact with the enemy unit. The Orc Warrior unit charges the Man-at-Arms unit. The charging unit has to drift left to bring an additional creature into melee contact.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:09 PM Page 137

Man-at-Arms unit

two casualties

four attackers Orc Warrior unit attacks

Charging Example Move: The Orc Warrior unit moves forward 7 inches, charging the Man-at-Arms unit. It must drift 1 inch to bring more creatures into melee contact with the enemy unit. When it engages the Man-at-Arms unit, the Orc Warrior unit makes a free pivot to converge, lining up edge to edge with the enemy unit.

CHAPTER 6:

Orc Warrior unit converges

MASS BATTLE RULES

Orc Warrior unit charges (and drifts)

Attack: The Orc Warrior unit gets a +2 bonus on melee attacks for charging and can make four melee attack rolls (three for the creatures in melee contact, plus one for the adjacent Orc Warrior on the right). One attack roll scores a hit, dealing 10 points of damage. The Man-at-Arms unit sustains two casualties (5 hp each). Morale Save: Sustaining casualties from a charge means the Man-at-Arms unit has to make a morale save (DC 20). The unit has a +4 bonus on its morale save because there are still two ranks left after sustaining the casualties. If it fails the save, the unit becomes shaken (–2 penalty on attacks, AC, and morale saves).

unformed unit can move in any direction and usually does not need to pivot, but it can. A unit can’t charge if it starts its turn engaged by an enemy unit. (All it can do is either attack that unit or disengage; see below.) A unit can’t charge if it can’t see an enemy unit at the start of its turn. If anything prevents a unit from charging the nearest enemy unit, it can’t charge at all.

Engaging the Enemy If the charging unit is formed and can get more of its creatures into melee contact (see below) with the enemy unit by drifting, it must do so. If the charging unit is unformed, it must charge the nearest edge of the enemy unit. It can’t, for example, charge to contact a formed unit’s side if there is a shorter path to the formed unit’s front.

Casualties and Morale Saves If the charging unit causes any casualties to the defending unit, the defending unit must make a morale save. If the charging unit fails to cause even one casualty to the defending unit, then the charging unit must make a morale save. (Lone creatures, however, do not cause or make morale saves when they charge or are charged.) In either case, a unit must make two morale saves instead of one if the other unit’s level is 5 or more higher than its own (see Charging and Morale Saves).

DISENGAGE A unit may attempt to disengage from (move out of contact with) an enemy unit that it starts the turn engaged with, but doing so is risky. Before actually moving, the disengaging unit first must make a morale save with a –4 penalty. Regardless of the save’s result, the

enemy unit from which it is disengaging then gains an attack of opportunity against the disengaging unit. The enemy unit makes a melee attack against the disengaging unit as normal, except that each creature can make only a single attack roll (not all the melee attacks it might have). This attack of opportunity doesn’t count against any other attacks the unit might be able to make in the round. A disengaging unit can take no actions other than moving. (For example, it can’t make an attack and then move away.) It can move up to its speed and may even drift, pivot, or back up (if it’s a formed unit). A disengaging unit must end its movement at least 1 inch away from the enemy unit from which it is disengaging. If it cannot, due to movement penalties or space limitations, then the unit cannot disengage.

ATTACKS AND DAMAGE

The rules for melee and ranged attacks in mass battles are similar. This section begins with a discussion of melee attacks and then describes the ways in which ranged attacks differ. When a unit attacks an enemy unit, all eligible creatures make their attack rolls simultaneously. Usually this involves rolling several d20s at once. (A set of melee attacks is sometimes referred to as a “mass strike.”) Each roll is modified by the unit’s attack rating (melee or ranged, as appropriate) and compared to the defending unit’s AC. Each hit deals damage to the defending unit.

Critical Hits Every time an attacking unit rolls a natural 20 (an unmodified 20 on a roll of 1d20), that attack automatically hits and deals double damage. Some creatures are immune to critical hits and do not take double damage, but a natural 20 still hits.

137

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:09 PM Page 138

MELEE CONTACT When hostile units engage each other, use the rules for melee contact to determine how many creatures in each unit can attack.

Melee Contact (2)

Frontage

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

Even though creatures in a unit are on round bases, they are considered to be in melee contact with enemy creatures whose frontage touches their own. A creature’s frontage is the portion of its unit’s edge that corresponds to the width of the miniature’s base.

Man-at-Arms unit attack –2 –2 AC

Orc Warrior unit attack +2 +2 AC

Lining Up Units (Offset) When hostile units engage each other, line them up so that their creatures’ frontages overlap, never directly opposite one another. This allows melee contact between the greatest number of individual creatures. If the frontages of one unit line up exactly with those of the other, then the unit that moved into position lines up slightly to one side or the other to offset the frontages.

Formed Units A formed unit can make a number of attack rolls equal to the number of its creatures in melee contact with the enemy unit, plus one for each adjacent creature in the same rank as those creatures (or in the same file, if the attack is against the unit’s side). There may be a creature on one or both sides of a group of creatures in melee contact, so the unit may be able to make one or two more attacks than the number of creatures in actual contact. See the accompanying diagram for an example. Facing Modifiers: Formed units are most effective when attacking enemies to the front, but they are more vulnerable to attacks against the sides and rear. A formed unit attacking an enemy unit to its front gains a +2 bonus on its attack rolls. Attack rolls against enemies to the side take a –2 penalty. Attacks against enemies to the rear take a –4 penalty.

Melee Contact (1) Sun Soul Initiate unit (unformed)

Orc Warrior unit (formed)

Man-at-Arms Unit: The unit can attack with only two creatures ( both considered to be in melee contact). It has a –2 penalty on attack rolls for attacking an enemy to its side. The Orc Warrior unit is being attacked from the front, so it has a+2 bonus to AC. Orc Warrior Unit: The unit can attack with five creatures (three in melee contact plus two adjacent). It has a +2 bonus on attack rolls for attacking an enemy to its front. The Man-at-Arms unit is being attacked from the side, so it has a –2 penalty to AC.

Likewise, a formed unit gets a +2 bonus to its AC when attacked from the front, a –2 penalty to AC when attacked in melee from the side, and –4 penalty to AC when attacked in melee from the rear. (These modifiers and others are summarized on Table 6–4.) Rarely, a formed unit has melee contact with an enemy unit only on a corner. In this case, the contact is considered to be along whichever edge is closer to the enemy unit. See the accompanying diagram for an example. Melee Reach: If a formed unit consists of Small or Medium creatures with Melee Reach 2 or better, it can make additional melee attack rolls against enemies to its front. The second rank of creatures can attack as if they were in the front rank, determining melee contact in the same way. Large units having Melee Reach 3 or better also get this benefit. (In the best case, Melee Reach allows a formed unit to make twice as many attack rolls as normal.) Melee Reach does not allow units to make more melee attack rolls when attacking to a side or to the rear.

Unformed Units Sun Soul Initiate Unit: The The two two creatures creatures in in melee melee contact contact can attack the Orc Warrior unit. The third Sun Soul Initiate on the same edge is too far away to attack. Since the Orc unit is being attacked from the front, it has a +2 bonus to AC. Orc Warrior Unit: Four Fourcreatures creaturescan canattack attackthe theInitiate Initiateunit. unit. Three are in melee contact, and a fourth is adjacent to a creature on the same edge that is in melee contact. Since the Orc unit is attacking an enemy to its front, it has a +2 bonus on attack rolls.

138

An unformed unit has empty space between any two creatures. Unformed units, therefore, get fewer attack rolls in melee because they can’t bring as much force to bear against the enemy. Since no two creatures in an unformed unit are really adjacent, a creature can attack only if it or the adjacent empty space is in melee contact. (Treat the empty space as having a frontage equal to its width.) Melee Reach: Unformed units, because of their loose order, cannot make extra melee attack rolls by using the Melee Reach ability.

Engaged with Multiple Units A unit attacks all enemy units that it engages. A given creature, however, can contribute to attacks against only one enemy unit.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:10 PM Page 139

Shifting

Man-at-Arms an-at-Arms unit

Orc Warrior unit

Man-at-Arms unit

Orc Warrior unit

Shifting A unit that starts its turn engaged by an enemy unit can shift to one side to put more of its edge in melee contact with the enemy unit. The distance of this shift is equal to the width of the base of one of the creatures in the unit. A shift does not count as movement. A unit of creatures with multiple melee attacks can make all of its attacks after shifting. A unit can’t shift if doing so doesn’t increase the length of the edge that’s in melee contact with the enemy. A unit also can’t shift when doing so would take it out of contact with a second enemy unit or reduce the length of the edge that’s in melee contact with any enemy unit.

CHAPTER 6:

1 inch

MASS BATTLE RULES

If a creature in a formed unit is in melee contact with one enemy unit and is adjacent to a creature in melee contact with another enemy unit, it can’t contribute to attacks against the second unit. If a creature is in melee contact with two enemy units, it can contribute to attacks against either one but not against both. If it is adjacent to creatures that are in contact with two different units, it can contribute to attacks against either one but not against both. (When the attacking creatures are in an unformed unit, treat the adjacent empty spaces in the unit as adjacent creatures for purposes of this rule.) Before you make melee attack rolls against an enemy unit, you commit to which creatures are contributing to that attack. You can’t roll first and then decide to add other creatures to the attack.

The Man-at-Arms unit begins its turn already engaged with the Orc Warrior unit. In this position, the Man-at-Arms unit can make four melee attack rolls against the enemy unit. The Man-at-Arms unit has the option of shifting one base width (1 inch) to the right to bring more of its edge into melee contact with the Orc Warrior unit. After doing so, it can make five melee attack rolls instead of four.

Pivoting around a Point of Contact An unformed unit can pivot around a point of contact with an enemy unit if doing so brings more creatures into contact with the enemy unit. It can’t perform this pivot if it would be disengaging from other units by doing so. This movement counts normally against the unit’s movement in a round.

Man-at-Arms unit

Units of Differing Size Often a unit made up of smaller creatures has more of them in melee contact than an opposing unit with bigger creatures has. For instance, when a formed unit of Small creatures (six per rank) is lined up front to front with a formed unit of Large creatures (three per rank), all six Small creatures are in contact with the three Large creatures. All six Small creatures contribute to the melee attack, making six attack rolls, while the three Large creatures respond with three attack rolls.

Narrow Gaps between Units Sometimes terrain or another unit prevents a unit from converging completely with an enemy that it engages. In this case, creatures along the nearer edge are considered to be in melee contact if they’re within 1 inch of the enemy unit. (Walls, other creatures, and other obstacles that would prevent a creature from moving up to the enemy prevent this contact.)

high wall

GENERAL MELEE RULES All units abide by these rules for melee combat, whether formed or unformed.

Orc Warrior unit

Melee Contact on a Corner The Orc Warrior unit has engaged the Man-at-Arms unit but can’t converge because of the high wall. Creatures within 1 inch of the enemy unit's nearer side (each unit's front, in this case) are in melee contact, and adjacent creatures can also attack. Four creatures in the Orc Warrior unit can attack the Man-at-Arms unit, and three creatures in the Man-at-Arms unit can attack the Orc Warrior unit.

Multiple Melee Attacks Some creatures have multiple melee attacks, indicated on the stat card by two or more numbers separated by a slash (such as +7/+2). A unit of such creatures first makes a mass strike using the number preceding the slash. After the effects of damage are applied (including any morale saves by the defending unit), a unit may make another mass strike using the number following the slash, and so on for each attack available. All of the attacks made by a creature in the unit must be made against the unit the creature attacked during the first mass strike. If a unit with multiple melee attacks moves at all in its turn, it can make a mass strike only once (using the number preceding

139

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 12:10 PM Page 140

the first slash). If the attacks deal different damage, it can choose which one to use. A unit that attacks more than once can’t move afterward.

Melee Attacks against Lone Creatures

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

Lone creatures are easy for groups of enemies to surround and overwhelm. When a formed unit attacks a lone creature, twice as many creatures as normal can attack it. (The unit still can’t have more creatures attack than it has creatures.)

RANGED ATTACKS Just as in melee, a unit makes all ranged attack rolls simultaneously, each modified by the unit’s ranged attack rating. (A set of ranged attack rolls is also called a “volley.”) Most of the units that make ranged attacks are unformed, but some creatures with limited-use ranged attacks can be in formed units.

MODIFIERS TO RANGED COMBAT

Illus. by D. Hanley

Choosing a Target A ranged attack must be against the nearest enemy unit in line of sight and within range. The nearest enemy unit is the one that contains the nearest creature. When determining which unit is nearest, an attacking unit may ignore lone creatures (but it does not have to). A unit can target only one enemy unit with a volley; you can’t split ranged attack rolls to attack two or more targets at once. Commanders can give a unit of creatures with ranged attacks (also called a “ranged unit”) a special order to ignore nearer units and target more distant units. Unformed ranged units may shoot in any direction without considering facing.

Determining Range Unless otherwise noted on a creature’s stat card, all ranged attacks have a range of 24 inches. To determine if a target unit is within range, measure from the nearest base edge of the nearest miniature in the attacking unit to the nearest base edge of the nearest miniature in the target unit. If that distance is 24 inches or less, the ranged unit can attack normally.

Maximum Number of Ranged Attacks When an unformed unit fires a volley, the number of attack rolls is limited by the size of the creatures making up the unit, as shown on the following table. Of course, if the unit contains fewer creatures than the maximum number of attacks allowed, it can make only as many attacks as it has creatures. Creature Size Small Medium Large

volley using the number preceding the slash. After the effects of damage are applied, it may fire another volley using the number following the slash, and so on for each attack available. A ranged unit with multiple attacks may select a different legal target for each volley. Usually the unit must attack the nearest enemy unit, but exceptions exist. For example, an Elf Archer unit might ignore a lone Troll to shoot at an Orc Spearfighter unit. Its first volley deals enough damage to cause the Orc unit to become shaken. In light of the Orc unit’s lowered morale state, the lone Troll is a more serious threat, so the second volley targets it. Just as with melee attacks, if a unit with multiple ranged attacks moves at all in its turn, it can fire a volley only once (using the number preceding the first slash). If the attacks deal different damage, it can choose which one to use. A unit that attacks more than once can’t move afterward. The following modifiers apply to ranged combat. (These modifiers and others are summarized on Table 6–4.)

Melee Contact A unit cannot make a ranged attack if it is engaged by an enemy unit.

Cover Units and certain terrain features, such as walls, trees, and statues, provide cover against ranged attacks. Cover makes it harder to hit an enemy: The defending unit gains a +4 bonus to Armor Class. To determine whether a unit has cover from a ranged attack, determine whether the attacking unit has clear line of sight. Line of sight is clear if every attacking creature in the ranged unit can trace a clear path to at least one creature in the defending unit. Multiple attackers can all use the same defender to determine line of sight. If the path between even one attacking creature and a defending creatures passes through another unit (allied or enemy) or through terrain that provides cover (see Terrain Effects on Cover), the defending unit has cover. Intervening Units: If one or more units (allied or enemy) are in

Maximum Number of Ranged Attacks 8 6 4

For formed units making ranged attacks, see below.

Limited Ranged Attacks If the creatures in a unit have a limited number of ranged attacks (usually one), then the unit itself has that limit. Each time the unit fires a volley, this counts against the limit regardless of how many creatures actually attack.

Multiple Ranged Attacks

140

Some creatures have multiple ranged attacks, indicated on the stat card by two or more numbers separated by a slash (such as +6/+1). Just as with melee attacks, a unit of such creatures first fires a

Drow Archer

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:46 PM Page 141

Number of Attackers

Intervening Units Orc Warrior unit Elf Archer unit clear shot

All creatures in the rank or file along the edge from which the attack originates, and up to one additional rank or file (whichever is closer to the enemy unit), can participate in a ranged attack. The number of ranged attack rolls equals that number of creatures (but is still halved against defending unformed units). Each volley of ranged attacks counts against the unit’s limit, even if not all creatures in the unit participated in the volley.

The Elf Archer unit is making a ranged attack against the Orc Warrior unit. Three creatures in the Archer unit have a clear shot to at least one creature in the Orc unit, and three do not. If all six creatures shoot, the Orc unit will have a +4 bonus to AC because of the intervening Elf Archer unit. (The unit already has a +4 bonus to AC because it's in melee with the attacking unit's allies.) If only the three creatures with a clear shot attack, the Orc unit doesn't get the AC bonus for the intervening unit.

the path of a ranged attack, the defending unit has cover. Lone creatures do not provide cover for other creatures against ranged attacks. If intervening units exist, the attacking unit has the option of making fewer than the allowed number of ranged attack rolls, attacking only with creatures that have a clear line of sight to the enemy unit.

Shooting into Melee Whenever a ranged unit attacks an enemy unit that engages or is engaged by an allied unit, the defending unit gains a +4 bonus to AC.

Ranged Attacks against Unformed Units A ranged unit only gains half as many attack rolls as otherwise allowed (round down, minimum one) against a defending unformed unit (including a lone creature).

FORMED UNITS MAKING RANGED ATTACKS While creatures with unlimited ranged attacks can’t be in formed units, some creatures have a limited number of ranged attacks (usually one). These creatures can be in formed units. When making a ranged attack, such a unit follows the general rules for ranged attacks, modified as follows.

Facing When a formed unit makes a ranged attack, determine which edge of the unit the attack originates from. This is the edge of the attacking unit that is nearest to the nearest creature in the defending unit. Apply the appropriate modifier to the attack rolls as if the ranged unit were making a melee attack (+2 if attacking to its front, –2 if attacking to its side, and –4 if attacking to its rear).

Modifier Attack +2 Attack –2 Attack –4 Double attacks

Formed Unit Defending Against . . . Melee attack from front Melee attack from side Melee attack from rear Ranged attack from front Ranged attack from side or rear

Modifier +2 AC –2 AC –4 AC +2 AC +0 AC

Attacker in Melee Combat Is . . . Charging Shaken Routing On higher ground

Modifier Attack +2 Attack –2 No attacks Attack +1

Defender in Melee Combat Is . . . Shaken Routing

Modifier –2 AC –4 AC

Attacker in Ranged Combat Is . . . Shaken Routing On higher ground

Modifier Attack –2 No attacks Attack +0

Defender in Ranged Combat Is . . . Behind partial cover Behind total cover Also in melee combat Unformed

Modifier +4 AC Cannot be attacked +4 AC Takes half as many attacks –2 AC –4 AC

Shaken Routing

CHAPTER 6:

Elf Archer unit no clear shot

Formed Unit Attacking . . . To front To side To rear Against lone creature

MASS BATTLE RULES

Table 6–4: Combat Modifiers

DAMAGE AND CASUALTIES When a unit takes damage, it is reduced in strength, losing individual members. In a sense, creatures are to a unit what hit points are to a creature. No matter how many creatures are in a unit, the unit as a whole has a single hit point rating, which is equal to the hit point rating of any single creature in the unit. For example, if a Manat-Arms unit contains ten creatures, each with 5 hit points, the unit has a hit point rating of 5.

Casualties Damage taken by a unit causes a loss of individual miniatures. Each amount of damage a unit takes that is equal to the unit’s hit point rating removes one miniature from the unit. A removed miniature is called a casualty. For instance, if the Man-at-Arms unit in the example above takes 5 points of damage from an enemy unit’s attack, it takes

141

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:46 PM Page 142

one casualty, and one Man-at-Arms miniature is removed. If it takes 10 points of damage, the unit takes two casualties. It doesn’t matter whether the damage comes from multiple hits or a single successful attack. Formed Units: When a formed unit takes casualties, miniatures are removed from the unit’s rearmost rank. Unformed Units: When an unformed unit takes casualties, miniatures farthest from the unit’s leading edge are removed first. Melee Contact: If possible, remove as casualties those miniatures that are not in melee contact with enemy units. Advancing to Maintain Contact: Sometimes a unit may take enough casualties that creatures in an enemy unit engaging it are no longer in melee contact. In this case, that enemy unit may advance so that its creatures remain in contact. This movement is free and occurs even if it’s not that player’s phase. An enemy unit may advance in this way even if it didn’t cause the casualties, and even if it’s Red Samurai a formed unit moving sideways (which it normally can’t do). A unit can’t advance in this way if it would be disengaging from other units by doing so.

Illus. by S. Tappin

Tracking Damage Sometimes a unit takes damage that is less than its hit point rating and is thus insufficient to cause a casualty. In this case, the unit adds this amount of damage to the damage dealt to it when it is next attacked. (You can use the damage counters from the D&D Miniatures Entry Pack to track this.) Damage applies to the unit as a whole, not to any particular creature in it.

Down to the Last Creature If a unit is reduced to one miniature, it is now a lone creature. If the damage that reduces a unit to a lone creature also would have caused the unit to make a morale save, the lone creature makes that save and takes the effects as a normal unit would. However, a failure reduces the lone creature’s morale state to routing, even if the unit was not shaken. Any remaining damage that would normally have been applied to the unit is instead dealt to that lone creature. If this is enough to drop that creature’s hit points to one-half or less of its starting amount, it must make a morale save or rout (see Lone Creatures and Morale Saves, below). If a commander was attached to the unit, it is no longer attached, because a lone creature can’t have a commander attached to it (see Attached Commanders, below). Place the commander anywhere within 1 inch of the lone creature.

SPECIAL ATTACK EFFECTS

142

Sometimes a creature’s attack has a special effect, such as with the Ghoul Touch special ability. In this case, it’s important to know not only how much damage a unit of those creatures deals but also how many creatures in the defending unit might be affected by the special effect. The number of affected defending creatures is equal to the number of hits scored minus the number of casualties taken by the defenders.

For example, a Ghoul unit lands five hits on a Gnoll unit. Each hit deals 5 points of damage, for a total of 25. Each Gnoll has 10 hp, so the unit takes two casualties. Since the Gnoll unit took only two casualties from five hits, three other Gnolls have to make saves to avoid the Ghoul Touch special ability. When some but not all creatures in a unit are subject to an effect, the defender usually chooses between having that whole unit take the effect or eliminating the affected creatures. All creatures eliminated in this way count toward victory for the attacking player. See the glossary at the end of this chapter for details on specific conditions.

MORALE

When a unit’s fortunes shift, or something unexpected happens, there is a possibility that its morale state will change. The morale state of a unit is the general attitude of the creatures in a unit. It usually changes only if the unit fails a morale save. Morale saves are special saves that units must make in response to triggering conditions, as set out below. Normal: Units exist in this morale state by default, when everything is going well. Shaken: Units in this state are uneasy, unwilling to enter combat, and likely to bolt. Routing: Units in this state are in full retreat, and unless rallied (see Rallying, below), rout off the battlefield. A unit’s morale state can be improved by one step if it makes a special morale save called a rally check (see Rallying, below). Morale works differently for commanders and lone creatures than it does for units.

MORALE SAVES To make a morale save, roll 1d20 and add the unit’s level rating, then compare the result to the morale save’s Difficulty Class (DC). The DC for all morale saves is 20. If the result equals or exceeds the save DC, the unit’s morale state is unchanged. If the result is lower than the save DC, the unit’s morale state worsens by one step. However, a unit that fails a morale save caused by a spell or special ability becomes routing regardless of its original morale state. As with any save, a natural 1 always fails and a natural 20 always succeeds. A unit must immediately make a morale save when any of the following triggering conditions occur. These conditions are explained in detail below. —It takes its first casualty. —It takes casualties totaling half or more of its initial strength (number of miniatures). —It takes a casualty from an attack by a unit that just charged it.* —It charges another unit and fails to cause at least one casualty.* —It disengages from an enemy unit. —It is a formed unit and becomes unformed for any reason. —An attached commander leading from the front moves to the rear, detaches, or is destroyed.** *If the enemy unit is at least 5 levels higher than the unit making the morale save, the saving unit makes two morale saves instead of one (see Charging and Morale Saves, below).

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:46 PM Page 143

**If the unit is not engaged, a commander that’s detaching or moving to the rear can cancel the move if the morale save fails (see Changing Attachment, below).

Casualties and Morale Saves

A number of conditions can modify a morale save, as shown in the table below. All modifiers are cumulative.

Table 6–5: Morale Save Modifiers

CHAPTER 6:

Condition Modifier Engaged enemy unit to the side –2 Engaged enemy unit to the rear –4 Engaged enemy unit is on higher ground –1 Unit is shaken –2 Unit is routing –4 Unit is formed +2/rank Unit is disengaging –4 Attached commander at rear +1/2 Commander rating Attached commander at front + Commander rating Special orders By order; see Special Orders, below

MASS BATTLE RULES

Taking casualties causes a unit to make morale saves, as the survivors question whether they’re going to be next. First Casualty: A unit makes a morale save when it takes its first casualty. Simply taking damage is not enough to force a morale save: The unit has to lose a creature. Half Strength: A unit makes a morale save when it takes casualties for the first time that bring it to half its original strength or below (round down). For example, a unit containing fifteen creatures makes a morale save when it takes its eighth casualty, leaving only seven creatures. If a unit takes its first casualty and is reduced to half strength in the same attack, it must make a morale save for both conditions. For instance, a unit with an original strength of five creatures that takes three casualties in the first attack against it makes two morale saves.

MORALE SAVE MODIFIERS

MORALE STATES Every unit exists in one of three morale states: normal, shaken, or routing.

Charging and Morale Saves Normally, any charge entails one or more morale saves. Taking Casualties from a Charge: A unit makes a morale save if another unit charges it and causes at least one casualty with the attack that follows that charge. Ineffective Charge: A unit makes a morale save if it charges another unit but fails to cause at least one casualty with the attack that follows that charge. Two Saves: If the unit making the save has a level at least 5 lower than the other unit, then the saving unit (either the unit that made the charge or the unit that was charged) has to make two morale saves, one after the other. A commander attached to a unit does not affect its level for these purposes. Lone Creatures: Lone creatures don’t make or cause morale saves by charging or being charged.

Disengaging A disengaging unit makes a morale save at a –4 penalty before starting its move. (See Disengage, earlier in this chapter.)

Becoming Unformed A formed unit makes a morale save if it becomes unformed. This usually happens when it loses so many miniatures that it can no longer maintain even a single rank.

Commander No Longer Leading from the Front If a commander is leading a unit from the front, the unit makes a morale save when the commander detaches, moves to the rear, or is destroyed. (See Attached Commanders, below, for more information.)

CUMULATIVE MORALE SAVES Morale saves that result from charging or becoming unformed are cumulative with any that result from casualties. For example, an undamaged, formed Man-at-Arms unit contains five 1st-level creatures with 5 hp each. It is charged by an Umber Hulk (8th level), which deals 15 points of damage to the unit, enough to cause three casualties. The Man-at-Arms unit, which now consists of two creatures, must make five morale saves: one for taking its first casualty, one for dropping to half strength, two for taking casualties when charged by a unit at least 5 levels higher, and one for becoming unformed (the unit now has too few creatures to fill a complete rank).

Normal A unit in this state can act normally in all regards.

Shaken A shaken unit is less effective in combat. It takes the following penalties: –2 penalty on all attack rolls. –2 penalty to AC. –2 penalty on morale saves. A shaken unit cannot move to where an enemy unit engages it. (If it’s already engaged, however, it is not required to disengage.) It can still move to engage an enemy unformed unit.

Routing A routing unit flees combat. It routs immediately when it descends to this morale state, even if the unit has not yet been activated. A routing unit moves at double speed along the most efficient path toward its edge of the battlefield. The most efficient path is the one that gets it closest to that edge, taking into account additional movement costs for terrain. This could be a path that is not straight, as long as it gets the routing unit closer to the edge than other paths. When a routing unit moves away from enemy units that engage it, each enemy unit may make an attack of opportunity against the routing unit. However, if the unit is routing as the result of an attack from a unit engaging it, the unit that just attacked it doesn’t get this attack of opportunity. A unit that routs off the battlefield is eliminated. A unit is off the battlefield if any part of the base of any miniature in it goes over the edge. A routing unit can’t make any attacks, including ranged attacks. A routing unit takes a –4 penalty on morale saves. A routing unit that fails a morale save immediately moves again at double speed toward the battlefield edge. When a routing unit activates, it continues to move at double speed along the same path it had been traveling, unless a commander successfully rallies it. Whether a routing unit is formed or unformed, facing is ignored for the purpose of attacks against it. The unit takes a –4 penalty to AC.

143

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:47 PM Page 144

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

RALLYING

LONE CREATURES AND COMMANDERS

A unit’s morale state may be improved by one step with a special morale save called a rally check. Whenever a shaken or routing unit activates, an allied commander may activate as well and attempt to rally that unit. The commander must be in command range (see Command Range, below), and it must put the unit under command. Attempting to rally a unit is a standard action for a commander. Thus, a commander may move before or after attempting to rally a unit, but it cannot also attack on that turn. When a commander makes a rally attempt, the shaken or routing unit makes another morale save. If it succeeds, its morale state improves by one step (shaken becomes normal; routing becomes shaken). If it fails, the unit’s morale state is unchanged. In any event, the commander completes its turn and the unit then takes its turn.

Illus. by S. Tappin

Lone Creatures and Morale Saves When its hit points first drop to half or less of its starting amount, a lone creature makes a morale save. If it fails, it routs. Charging and being charged do not involve morale saves for lone creatures, or for the units that charge or are charged by them. Commanders can’t attach to lone creatures, so morale saves for attached commanders do not apply. A lone creature (other than a commander) makes a rally check in the same way as any other unit, but if the check succeeds, its morale state returns to normal. A lone creature is never shaken—it’s either fine, or it’s running away.

Commanders and Morale Saves Results of Rally Check

144

Lone creatures and commanders make morale saves differently from units.

If a unit’s morale state improved from shaken to normal, the successful rally check counts as a move action. The unit can now move up to its speed or make a single attack. If the unit’s morale state improved from routing to shaken, the successful rally check counts as a standard action. The unit can now move up to its speed, but it can’t attack during its turn (even if it has multiple attacks). A formed unit that goes from routing to shaken regains normal facing and can pivot to face any direction (unless it would be disengaging from other units by doing so). If the unit’s morale state did not improve because the rally check failed, then it takes its turn as normal. Failing to rally doesn’t take up any of the unit’s time.

A commander’s morale works like a lone creature’s, even if it is attached to a unit. It makes a morale save only when its hit points first drop to half or less of its starting amount. It is never affected when the unit to which it is attached fails a morale save. An attached commander leading from the front gains the same modifier on its morale saves as the unit itself, such as +2 per rank. (It does not, however, add the bonus for having an attached commander leading from the front.) A commander always adds its full Commander rating to its own morale save, whether it’s leading from the front or the rear, or even if it’s not attached to a unit. A routing commander moves at double speed toward its edge of the battlefield normally. If it was attached to a unit, it detaches. Detaching counts as a move action, and also triggers a morale save

A commander can attach to a unit and lead either from the rear or from the front.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:47 PM Page 145

Attached Commanders

Leading from the Rear: Cleric of Yondalla

Man-at-Arms an-at-Arms unit

Leading from the Front: The Tiefling Captain is leading from the front. The unit gets a morale bonus equal to the Tiefling’s Commander rating (+4). The Tiefling can’t spend command points on other units. It can take part in attacks; in this case, up to four creatures in the Man-at-Arms unit can attack it. Damage applied to the unit still doesn’t apply to the commander. The unit must make a morale save if the Tiefling is destroyed, moves to the rear, or detaches from the unit.

CHAPTER 6:

Tiefling Captain

MASS BATTLE RULES

The Cleric of Yondalla is leading from the rear. The unit gets a morale bonus equal to half the Cleric’s Commander rating (+1). The Cleric can spend command points on other units within 6 inches. Damage applied to the unit is not applied to the Cleric. The unit does not make a morale save if the Cleric is destroyed or detaches from the unit.

Orc Warrior W unit

In either case, the actual position of the miniature is not relevant, only whether the commander is leading from the front or from the rear.

COMMANDERS

Every army requires at least one commander, or its Human Thug battlefield lifetime will be measured in just a few rounds. If you’ve translated your D&D roleplaying character to use in mass battles, most likely he or she is a commander. Unlike commanders in the skirmish rules, commanders in mass battles have a number of command points equal to their Commander rating, which they use to put units under command and to help units fight. Commanders can spend command points regardless of whether they’re currently activating. A commander on the battlefield is either attached to a unit or unattached. An attached commander activates and moves with the unit. An unattached commander behaves as a lone creature and can activate during any phase without counting against the limit of three activations per phase.

Table 6–6 summarizes what commanders of various sorts are capable of. Each of the table entries is explained in detail in the following section.

ATTACHED COMMANDERS A commander may be attached to a unit. An attached commander benefits its unit but is less able to command nearby units. A commander may begin a battle attached to a unit, or it may attach itself to a unit at a later time.

Illus. by S. Tappin

for the unit left behind. A routing commander can’t spend command points, put units under command, attach to a unit, or use its Commander Effect. It can attempt to rally itself on its own turn, adding its own Commander rating to the roll. If it succeeds, it is no longer routing but can take no further actions that turn. If it fails, it continues to move at double speed toward the battlefield edge.

Attaching to a Unit Any time an unattached commander comes into contact with a unit in its army, it may take a move action to attach, choosing to lead either from the front or the rear. If the unit hasn’t activated yet, the newly attached commander can move with the unit but not attack with it.

Numbers, Ranks, and Attached Commanders Only a single commander may be attached to a given unit. Place the attached commander’s miniature on the unit’s tray. An attached commander counts toward filling ranks in a formed unit. Thus, a formed unit that contains four Medium creatures and a commander has one complete rank. (It doesn’t matter if the commander is a different size from the others.) Additionally, a commander can be attached to a unit that already has the maximum number of creatures. The commander’s miniature is

145

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:47 PM Page 146

commander. For example, if an allied cleric casts legion’s conviction on your unit, you can have the spell benefit the attached commander. But when an opponent’s cleric casts legion’s curse of petty failing on the unit, you can have your commander ignore that effect. An attached commander leads its unit either from the front or from the rear, whether the unit is formed or unformed. The position of the commander’s miniature indicates this but doesn’t represent the commander’s actual location. It merely indicates whether the commander is at the forefront of the action or hanging back. Whether it is leading from the front or rear, the distance to and from an attached commander is the same as the distance to and from the unit itself. The position of the actual miniature representing the commander is not relevant. For example, a commander leading from the rear can spend command points on other units within 6 inches of the unit to which it is attached.

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

COMMANDER POSITION

Axe Sister

Leading from the Front on the unit’s tray, while the additional miniature trails the unit until it takes casualties.

Illus. by S. Tappin

Unit Activation and Attached Commanders An attached commander activates when the unit it’s attached to activates. Generally, you can choose to activate a commander just before or just after its unit does. Sometimes the commander must activate first, such as when it attempts to rally a shaken or routing unit. Sometimes it must activate at the same time, such as when a commander leading from the front takes part in an attack.

Movement and Attached Commanders A unit with an attached commander always moves at the unit’s speed, even if that is faster than the commander’s speed. If the commander and its unit do not share a special movement mode (such as flying, teleporting, or burrowing), they cannot move together using that mode.

Morale and Attached Commanders If a unit is shaken, the attached commander is not. If a unit is routing, the attached commander must initially move toward the battlefield edge along with the unit. However, it is not considered to be routing itself. The commander can activate normally, put units under command, give special orders, or even detach from the routing unit.

Commander Effects and Attached Commanders The unit to which a commander is attached benefits from its Commander Effect, regardless of whether the commander is leading from the front or the rear. If the Commander Effect is effective against enemy creatures and the commander is leading from the front, it affects all enemy units that the commander’s unit engages. An unattached commander can use its Commander Effect on all units it engages.

Unit Effects and Attached Commanders

146

When an effect, such or a spell or a special ability, affects a unit, the unit’s controller chooses whether it also affects an attached

An attached commander leading from the front provides better support to its unit than one leading from the rear, but it is vulnerable to attack, and it is unable to command other units. In a formed unit, a commander gains the unit’s +2 bonus on attacks made against enemies to its front (and the +2 bonus to AC against attacks from the front). However, it also takes the penalties to attack and AC for attacks to or from the side or rear. Being Attacked: A unit attacking in melee can designate a number of its creatures as attacking an attached enemy commander leading from the front. Any number of enemy units that are attacking the commander’s unit can attack the commander. Only creatures in melee contact with the commander’s unit can attack the commander. Up to six creatures can be assigned to attack the commander in a given round. A commander leading from the front is not subject to ranged attacks or spells directed at its unit. If enough damage is dealt to the unit to eliminate all its creatures, any excess damage does not “spill over” onto the commander. Attacking: A commander leading from the front may substitute its own attack for that of a creature in the unit. A commander attacks at the same time that its unit attacks. For example, if four creatures in a unit can attack an enemy unit in melee, the commander may take the place of one of these creatures. The commander and three creatures make simultaneous melee attack rolls, which use the commander’s attack and damage ratings, not the creatures’. Having the commander attack is optional. Even if a formed unit can attack with all the creatures in its front rank, the commander does not have to be one of these attackers. If a unit is making attack rolls against both an enemy commander and the unit to which it’s attached, the attacking commander can choose to attack either the unit or the commander (or neither). Ranged Effects, Unit Not Engaged: A commander leading from the front can’t make ranged attacks unless its unit can make ranged attacks. It can’t cast spells or use special abilities, except on its own unit or itself. On the other hand, it can’t be specified as the target of ranged attacks, spells, or special abilities. Ranged Effects, Unit Engaged: A commander leading from the front can use only touch-range spells or special abilities. It can’t be the target of ranged attacks, spells, or special abilities.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:48 PM Page 147

Creatures assigned to attack the commander in melee, however, can attack it with special abilities that replace their attacks, such as Gaze Attack and Breath Weapon. Morale: When a commander leads from the front, its unit gains a bonus on morale saves equal to its Commander rating. Command Range: If a commander leads from the front, it can spend command points on and issue special orders to only its own unit.

Leading from the Rear

CHAPTER 6:

MASS BATTLE RULES

An attached commander leading from the rear, unlike one leading from the front, can command nearby units and is safe from attack. However, it doesn’t benefit its unit as much in combat. Being Attacked: A commander leading from the rear cannot be targeted by an attack. When the unit takes casualties, the commander is never among them. When the unit loses its last creature, any extra damage from that attack is wasted. It does not “spill over” onto the commander.

A commander leading from the rear of a formed unit can’t be attacked even if the unit is attacked from the rear. Remember that the position of the commander’s miniature represents the manner in which it is leading, not the commander’s actual location. A commander leading from the rear is vulnerable, however, if an enemy with multiple attacks eliminates the unit and has attacks left over. In this case, the attacking unit can direct its remaining attacks against the commander (which is now a lone creature). Attacking: A commander leading from the rear cannot make melee or ranged attacks or cast offensive spells against enemy units. It may cast beneficial spells on the unit to which it is attached. Morale: When a commander leads from the rear, the unit gains a bonus on morale saves equal to 1/2 its Commander rating (rounded down). Command Range: If a commander leads from the rear, it can spend command points on and issue special orders to its own

Table 6–6: What Commanders Can Do Rule Activation Movement

Morale bonus

Unattached Free Normal speed; can move through allied formed units as well as allied unformed units 24 inches if mutual line of sight; 6 inches regardless of line of sight No effect Affects all enemy units that the commander engages None, except for special orders

Make melee attacks

Yes

+1/2 Commander rating, plus any special orders No

Make ranged attacks

Yes

No

Cast spells/ use special abilities

Yes

Yes, targeting self or its unit only

Be attacked at range Be Attacked in Melee

Yes, as lone creature Yes, as lone creature

No No

Command range Commander Effect (friendly) Commander Effect (hostile)

Subject to same effect to — which unit is subject (friendly or hostile) Target of friendly effect Yes Detach from unit —

Move to front/rear

Move action to attach to an adjacent unit (and lead from the front or rear)

Attached—Rear With unit With unit

Attached—Front With unit With unit

6 inches regardless of line of sight Affects own unit No effect

Own unit only

At commander’s option Yes; count range to unit Move action at start of commander’s (and unit’s) turn

Free action at start of commander’s (and unit’s) turn to move to the front

Affects own unit Affects all enemy units that the commander’s unit engages + Commander rating, plus any special orders Yes; commander replaces one creature that would otherwise attack; share unit’s bonuses and penalties for facing Yes, if unit makes ranged attack; if formed unit, share its bonus or penalty for facing Yes, either targeting an enemy unit with a touch-range spell/ability or targeting its unit (or self) with any spell/ability No Yes, by up to four creatures per attacking unit (five if commander is larger than the attacking creatures) At commander’s option Yes; count range to unit Move action at start of commander’s (and unit’s) turn; unit makes morale save (if unit is not engaged, you can roll the save, then decide whether to detach the commander Free action at end of commander’s (and unit’s) turn to move to the rear; unit makes morale save with 1/2 commander’s command rating as a bonus (if unit is not engaged, you can roll the save, then decide whether to move the commander

147

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:48 PM Page 148

unit and other units within 6 inches, regardless of line of sight (count around obstacles). If any part of a unit is within command range, the whole unit is.

MASS BATTLE RULES Illus. by S. Tappin

CHAPTER 6:

Changing Attachment

Activation and Unattached Commanders You can activate any number of unattached commanders in any phase, and they don’t count against your limit of three activations per phase. Unattached commanders also don’t count when determining the number of phases in a round. An unattached commander does not have to spend command points on itself in order to act.

An attached commander can change its position relative to its unit. Moving from Rear to Front: A commander leading from the rear can switch to the front at the beginning of the unit’s (and the Attacks and Unattached Commanders commander’s) turn. Doing this is a free action, so the commander Unattached commanders can attack and be attacked just like any can move and attack as normal. other lone creature. Moving from Front to Rear: A commander leading from the front can switch to the rear at the end of the Morale and Unattached Commanders unit’s (and the commander’s) turn. Doing this An unattached commander makes morale saves just like other is a free action. However, the troops may lone creatures. It doesn’t normally affect the morale of other interpret such a move as a sign units, though it can spend command points to do so (see of weakness or fear. The unit to Orders, below). which the commander is attached must make an immediate morale Commander Effects and Unattached Commanders save (adding 1/2 its Commander An unattached commander’s Commander Effect does not affect rating for leading from the rear, not the commander’s allies. If the Commander Effect is effective the full Commander rating for leadagainst enemy creatures, it affects all enemy units that the coming from the front). mander engages. If the unit is not engaged, you may make the morale save first and decide Command Range whether to move the commander after An unattached commander may spend command seeing the result. If it will hurt the unit’s points on and issue special orders to units within morale to do so, you can cancel the 24 inches to which it has line of sight, or planned switch. within 6 inches if line of sight is blocked. Detaching: An attached commander Measure distance around obstacles, as in can detach from a unit at the beginning the skirmish rules. of its unit’s turn. Place the commander’s miniature in a position of your choice adjaMoving and Friendly Units cent to the unit. This now represents the Friendly units can move freely through commander’s actual location on the unattached commanders, whether the battlefield. Detaching counts as a move units are formed or not, and unattached action, so the commander can also attack commanders can move freely through or move up to its speed during this turn. friendly units. If a unit ends its moveIf the commander was leading from ment “on top of ” a commander, place the front, then after it completes its the commander’s miniature adjacent to the turn, the unit it detached from must unit’s edge closest to its original position. A Sword of Hieroneous make a morale save. (A unit’s morale is commander can’t end its movement on a not affected by the detachment of a comfriendly unit. mander leading from the rear.) As with switching a commander from the front to the rear, if the unit is ORDERS not engaged, you may make the morale save first and decide Commanders issue two kinds of orders. They put units under whether to detach the commander after seeing the result. command, which allows a unit to act normally. Commanders also Death: If a commander leading from the front is destroyed, its issue special orders to improve units’ performance. unit immediately makes a morale save.

Command Points Forced Detachment If a detached commander loses its status as a commander (or otherwise loses its ability to attach to the unit), it can no longer be attached. It immediately moves to a position of the controlling player’s choice adjacent to the unit. For example, if a unit is confused, an attached commander might be forced out.

UNATTACHED COMMANDERS

148

Commanders do not have to be attached to units. An unattached commander acts independently of other units. It has a greater command range than an attached commander and can therefore more easily command a number of units. In general, unattached commanders are treated like other lone creatures. Some special rules apply, however.

Each commander has a Commander rating. In the skirmish rules, this number represents its overall effectiveness; in the mass battles rules, it indicates how many command points the commander can spend each round. For example, a Human Blackguard has a Commander rating of 6, so it has 6 command points to spend each round to direct its army. A commander can spend command points and issue special orders regardless of whether it’s activating or has activated in the round. Unused command points are lost at the end of a round. You can’t save up command points from one round to the next. Commanders can’t pool command points to issue a special order that none of them can issue individually.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:48 PM Page 149

Command Range

The most basic order is to put a unit under command. Doing this costs 1 command point. When a unit activates, it can take only compulsory actions unless it is under command. If a unit is put under command, it can act normally that round. A commander must put a unit under command before it can attempt to rally that unit. Remember that a unit engaging an enemy unit attacks that enemy as a compulsory action. Once a unit is in melee, it generally does not have to be under command.

Special Orders Commanders can issue special orders to units within command range. A commander can issue multiple special orders each round, up to the limit of its command points. The various special orders are summarized in Table 6–7 and described immediately following the table. A unit doesn’t have to be under command to receive a special order. A commander generally can’t issue a special order to a commander—not even to itself. The one exception is the special order to ignore nearer units when targeting a ranged attack or charging. A commander can issue this special order to itself (but not to another commander). A special order issued to a unit never applies to any commander attached to that unit. A unit can receive multiple special orders, even from multiple commanders, but orders do not stack with themselves. For example, you can’t spend 2 command points to grant a unit two +2 bonuses on its morale save twice (for a total of +4). The effects of a special order last until the end of a round. A difficult unit (see below) can receive special orders only from an attached commander whose Commander rating is at least as high as the unit’s Difficult rating.

DIFFICULT UNITS A difficult unit contains troops with the Difficult special ability. It is harder to command than a standard unit. A commander whose Commander rating is lower than a unit’s Difficult rating doesn’t count as a commander for that unit in any way. It can’t attach to the unit, it can’t put the unit under command, and it can’t issue special orders to the unit. Putting a difficult unit under command costs a number of command points equal to its Difficult rating. Issuing a special order to a difficult unit that is under command costs command points equal to its Difficult rating. A difficult unit that is out of command moves at double speed toward the nearest enemy unit as a compulsory action. It might be able to charge if it meets the conditions, but it has to move toward the enemy even if it can’t charge. Alternatively, a ranged unit can stand still and make a ranged attack (or use a ranged spell or special ability) against that enemy, if it is within range at the start of its turn. If it doesn’t see an enemy, it takes a compulsory action the way a normal unit does (see Units Out of Command, earlier in this chapter).

CHAPTER 6:

Putting Units Under Command

command point spent on this special order, the unit may ignore one enemy unit. For example, for 2 command points, a commander could issue an order allowing a ranged unit to shoot at the third-nearest unit (ignoring two units that are nearer). Morale Save Bonus: The commander must issue the special order before the unit makes the morale save. Attack Roll Bonus: The commander must issue the special order before the unit makes the attack rolls.

MASS BATTLE RULES

An unattached commander can issue orders to units within 24 inches and mutual line of sight, or to units within 6 inches regardless of line of sight. An attached commander leading from the rear can issue orders to units within 6 inches and mutual line of sight. It can always issue orders to its own unit even if, for some reason, it does not have line of sight to the unit (such as because the unit is invisible). An attached commander leading from the front can issue orders only to its own unit.

COMMANDER MORALE A commander’s morale is separate from that of the unit to which it is attached, if any. Whether a commander is attached or not, its morale works like that of a lone creature. A commander adds its own Commander rating to its morale saves.

VICTORY CONDITIONS

The Standard victory conditions, detailed below, set out the basic rules for winning a mass battle. To play a battle with different victory conditions or special situations, try one of the variants that follow. You can also mix and match the variant rules given below to create unique victory conditions. If you want variety or unpredictability, roll d% and consult Table 6–8 below. (Roll after building your armies.)

Table 6–7: Special Orders Special Order Challenge initiative1 Ignore targets2 Grant +2 bonus on morale saves Grant +4 bonus on morale saves Grant +2 bonus on attack rolls

Command Points 1 1/target 1 3 2

1 Only an unattached commander can issue this special order. 2 A commander can issue this special order to itself (but not to another commander).

Table 6–8: Random Mass Battles Victory Conditions d% Victory Condition 01–20 Standard 21–40 Quick Strike 41–60 Contested Ground 61–80 Ten-Round Battle 81–90 Variable-Length Battle 91–100 Reconnaissance in Force1 1 Two players only. If more than two players, reroll.

Standard Victory Condition Challenge Initiative: This order is not issued to a unit. The commander simply spends 1 command point to challenge initiative. Ignore Targets: Normally, a unit must choose the nearest enemy unit as the target of a ranged attack or a charge. For each

Each creature is worth its cost in victory points to the player who eliminates it. Each commander is worth an additional 20 points over its printed cost. Eliminating a creature can be accomplished by destroying it or causing it to rout off the battlefield. You win when you have scored victory points equal

149

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:49 PM Page 150

to the cost of your own army, or when all opponents’ creatures are eliminated. In a two-player battle with balanced armies, this victory condition amounts to simply eliminating your opponent’s army. These same victory conditions, however, work fine for multiplayer battles and contests between somewhat unbalanced armies. Eliminating Your Own Creatures: As always in these rules, units may not attack allied units. If you eliminate your own creature, or if your creature is eliminated through no action of an enemy (such as by routing off the battle grid because of the Cowardly ability), your opponents split the victory points for that creature, rounding down. (In a two-player battle, your opponent would receive all the points.) Tiebreaker: If no creature has made an attack roll or saving throw for 5 full rounds, the winner is the player who has eliminated the most points of enemy creatures. If players are still tied, the winner is the player who has a unit closest to the center of the battlefield.

Variable-Length Battle Beginning at the end of the sixth round, roll 1d6. On a result of 1 or 2, the battle ends, and the winner is the player with the highest victory point total. Otherwise, continue playing, rolling 1d6 at the end of each round until a 1 or 2 is rolled.

Reconnaissance in Force You don’t always have to kill your enemies to win. This victory condition also rewards conservation of your forces. You win when you have scored victory points equal to the cost of your own army. You score victory points both for the cost of enemy creatures you eliminate and for the cost of your own creatures that move off the opponent’s edge of the battlefield. This victory condition only works well for two-player battles.

CUSTOM BATTLES

Illus. by D. Hanley

Quick Strike This victory condition rewards early success, benefiting players who fight hard instead of hanging back. Instead of trying to score victory points equal to your army’s cost, you win by eliminating enemy creatures whose total cost is equal to 70% of your army’s cost. For a two-player battle between unevenly matched armies, this victory condition provides a more even contest.

Contested Ground In a scenario using this victory condition, armies vie to hold a strategically important piece of terrain. Place a piece of terrain in the center of the battlefield, ideally something significant, such as a ruined tower or a dragon skull. (You can arrange this terrain any way you like, as long as it covers the center point and is legally placed.) Beginning on the fifth round, victory goes to the first player who both begins and ends a round as the only player whose creatures occupy that central terrain. “Occupying” the terrain might mean being within 2 inches of it, if it is impassible. The creatures that end the round occupying the terrain don’t have to be the same creatures that started the round there. You still win even if enemy creatures occupy the terrain during the round, so long as they’re gone at the end of the round.

Ten-Round Battle Stop the battle at the end of 10 rounds. The winner is the player with the highest victory point total.

pqs MASS BATTLES CAMPAIGN You can run a mass battles campaign the same way you run a skirmish campaign (see Chapter 5), except that armies are ten times the size of skirmish warbands. For example, an army might start with 700 points’ worth of creatures instead of 70.

pqs

150

Lizardfolk

Sometimes a battle results from activities in a roleplaying campaign. In such cases, the campaign determines the setup, terrain, and armies involved. Sometimes the DM sets everything up; other times the PCs can, through their actions, affect the battle conditions. They might, for example, recruit allies or lure the enemies onto a battlefield that will work against them.

Roleplaying Victories If the battle pits the PCs and their troops on one side against the DM’s army, then the “victory conditions” are whatever makes sense in the campaign. The battle is a “win” or a “loss” only in the sense that any other D&D combat is. It’s possible, for example, that the player characters’ army could carry the field but take such severe casualties that it’s effectively a loss. The DM doesn’t set victory conditions for such a battle any more than he or she does for any other fight in the roleplaying campaign.

Competitive Victory Conditions If you want to fight out the battle competitively as a game in its own right, you’ll need hard and fast victory conditions. To even the odds in an unbalanced battle, let the weaker side win if it can merely rack up a certain number of victory points rather than having to wipe out the larger army. That way, a player can earn a tactical victory for doing better than expected, even if the army in the roleplaying campaign eventually gets defeated by a larger force. A simple way to test a custom battle for balance is to give the player who didn’t set up the battle the choice of sides. Alternatively, if both players want to play the same side (such as dwarves defending a bridge), they can “bid” victory points to play that side. Each player decides how many bonus victory points he or she will “pay” the opponent in exchange for choosing the favored side. The other player starts with victory points equal to the number bid, which count normally toward victory.

Special Scenarios Just as a DM creates adventures, you can create special mass battle scenarios. Your custom battles can be as detailed as you like, telling a story much as a roleplaying adventure does. Below are some ideas that you can use, combine, and alter. Ultimately, custom scenarios rely on your own imagination.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:57 PM Page 151

With four or six people, you can play team battles. Teammates sit facing each other across the battlefield so that one doesn’t go right after the other. Teammates have a single, combined victory point total. A teammate’s units generally count as allies, except that your commanders can’t command a teammate’s creatures.

pqs

CHAPTER 6:

TEAM BATTLES

TERRAIN

Few battles occur on open plains with no variation in elevation or landscape. Copses of trees, stone walls, hills, and other terrain features make battles far more challenging and interesting. Terrain in general affects movement and cover. Special terrain can affect other aspects of battle. Kobold Warrior

TERRAIN EFFECTS ON MOVEMENT

Units move at full speed only on open ground. They are slowed or diverted by landscape features. There are three general classifications of terrain that affect unit movement: open, difficult, and impassable.

Illus. by R. Wright

pqs

corps of orc-hunters. This unit must charge, approach, or attack units containing orcs (creatures whose stat card includes the Orc subtype) if possible. If the unit is engaging orcs, it gains a +4 bonus on morale saves. Tide of Battle: In a climactic battle between ancient foes, hope is an army’s best weapon. In each round, the player who is ahead in victory points wins initiative. A Thousand Kobolds: An army of elf crusaders is trying to defeat a Human Blackguard and his Lawful Evil army. They confront their enemies in a clearing deep within kobold-infested woods. At the end of every round, an unformed Kobold Warrior unit appears at one of six random locations 24 inches from the center of the battlefield. The unit contains 1d6 creatures and is now part of the Human Blackguard player’s army. If a Kobold Warrior unit appears in a spot where another such unit already exists and is not engaged, the two combine (up to a maximum of sixteen creatures). Since Kobold Warriors have the Cowardly special ability, these units might flee before even joining the battle unless the Lawful Evil commanders can send allied units near them or bring them near allied units.

MASS BATTLE RULES

Defend the Bridge: One side defends a wide bridge over a chasm while the other side tries to break through. Hold Out for Reinforcements: One side starts with a smaller army, but it has reinforcements coming. On each round starting with the fourth, there’s a 50% chance that the reinforcements show up. Neutral Units: A neutral Lizardfolk unit is arrayed for battle off to one side, committed to no army. When one player’s army has earned half the victory points needed to win, the Lizardfolk unit joins that army. Nighttime Battles: Vision is limited to 12 inches (60 feet). (Battles are normally assumed to take place during the day.) Noontime Battles: Creatures that are sensitive to light take combat penalties according to standard D&D rules. (Battles are normally assumed to take place under cloud cover or in indirect sunlight, such as early morning or late afternoon). Supreme Commander: One side has a larger army, but it is held together only by the personal presence of the army’s leader (the commander with the highest Commander rating). If that commander is killed, the army routs. Uneasy Alliance: Dwarves and hobgoblins, both lawful creatures, have sworn a temporary and uncomfortable pact to defeat the chaotic and evil drow and orcs. The lawful army has both good and evil creatures in it, but good commanders can’t issue orders to evil units, and vice versa. In fact, a good unit can’t voluntarily come within 6 inches of an evil unit, because the two of them are liable to forget the pact and attack each other. If a unit involuntarily ends up within 6 inches of an allied unit of opposing alignment (for example, because it is routing), it still cannot voluntarily move closer. (You can instead eliminate units to make room for units of the other alignment, but then the opponent gets the points for those eliminated units.) Disarray: One army deploys in a small area. The other deploys spread out around the battlefield, its creatures not yet arrayed in battle formation. The army that’s in one place has the advantage of being concentrated. The army that’s scattered can more easily surround the enemy. The scattered army still deploys in units, but no unit can be closer than 6 inches to an allied unit or closer than 12 inches to an enemy unit. Double Disarray: Both armies deploy scattered across the battlefield, following the same rules as in the Disarray scenario above. They represent survivors of a larger engagement scrambling to do battle and end the fight decisively. Dwarf Orc-Hunters: In a battle between Lawful Good and Chaotic Evil factions, a Dwarf Axefighter unit belongs to an elite

Open Terrain Open terrain amounts to no terrain at all. Obviously, it doesn’t affect movement.

Difficult Terrain Terrain that is difficult still allows units passage, but it slows them. Movement Penalty: All movement that a unit undertakes while any part of its space is in difficult terrain counts double. For instance, if a unit 3 inches deep encounters an area of briars 2 inches across, moving completely through that area costs the unit an extra 5 inches of movement. Difficult Terrain Types: The following types of terrain constitute difficult terrain. —Woods —Briars and other clinging vegetation —Slopes and hillsides (going uphill only) —Deep sand —Scree and boulder fields —Streams or fords in a river —Steps —Thick mud, bogs, and marshland —Wreckage and debris

Impassable Terrain Terrain that is impassable does not allow a unit or any part of a unit to move through the space it occupies on the battlefield.

151

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:58 PM Page 152

If any part of a unit is about to enter impassable terrain, the unit must pivot, back up, or otherwise reposition itself to avoid the terrain. Gaps and Unformed Units: Sometimes a piece of impassable terrain has a gap in it, such as an archway in a wall or a space between two walls, that is too narrow to admit a formed unit. Unformed units, however, can sometimes squeeze through narrow openings. An unformed unit can pass through a gap that is at least twice as wide as the base of each miniature in the unit. The unit must be able to move to a position in which no part of it overlaps the impassable terrain. (It can’t stop partway through the gap.) Impassable Terrain Types: The following types of terrain constitute impassable terrain. —High walls —Giant dragon skulls —Cliffs —Lakes —Deep rivers —Buildings

TERRAIN EFFECTS ON COVER Sometimes ranged attacks are obscured by intervening terrain, which provides cover. There are three types of cover: partial cover (such as from trees), low cover (such as from low walls), and total cover (such as from high walls).

Illus. by D. Hanley

Partial Cover Partial cover protects units behind it, but it does not block line of sight. Cover Bonus to Armor Class: When a unit makes ranged attacks against a unit with partial cover, the defending unit gets a +4 bonus to its AC. (This is the same bonus for cover that a unit gets from an intervening unit. The bonuses don’t stack.) Clear Line of Sight: As with intervening units (see Cover, earlier in this chapter), the defending unit does not benefit from cover if the attacking unit has clear line of sight. The attacking unit has the option of making fewer than the allowed number of ranged attack rolls, attacking only with creatures that have a clear line of sight to the enemy unit. Shooting Out of Partial Cover: An attacking unit can ignore partial cover within 1 inch of itself. Trace an imaginary line from the nearest point of the attacking unit to the nearest point of the defending unit. The first 1 inch of that line can cross terrain that grants partial cover without affecting the attack. For example, a ranged unit can stand just inside the edge of a woods and shoot out at enemies without penalty while benefiting from cover itself. Partial Cover Terrain Types: Woods are the only standard terrain type that provides partial cover.

Low Cover

152

Low cover works like partial cover, except that the defender has to be near the terrain for it to provide any protection. Cover Range: Low cover applies only to units within 6 inches of the terrain. Ignoring Nearby Cover: An attacking unit can ignore terrain that provides low cover if it is closer to that terrain than the defending unit is. That is, any low cover that’s closer to the attacking unit than the defending unit doesn’t provide cover for the defender. Low Cover Terrain Types: The following types of terrain can provide low cover.

—Low walls —Hedges —Low boulders

Total Cover Total cover blocks line of sight and ranged attacks. Blocking: A unit can’t make attacks against a unit that’s behind total cover. Clear Line of Sight: As with any other type of cover, all a unit needs is clear line of sight to at least one creature in the defending unit for the attack to be legal. You still can’t attack with more creatures than have a clear shot. If total cover even partly obscures the path between an attacking and defending creature, then the shot is blocked. Total Cover Terrain Types: The following types of terrain provide total cover. —High walls —Hills —Giant dragon skulls —Buildings —Enormous boulders

Minimum Movement A unit can always use its turn to move 1 inch in any direction, regardless of how much distance this move counts as. (This rule doesn’t allow a unit to move through impassable terrain or to move when all movement is prohibited, such as while it is paralyzed.)

UNITS AND TERRAIN Generally, treat a unit as “on” or “in” terrain if any creature in the unit is on or in the terrain, as defined in the skirmish rules. Sometimes, such as when determining how many clear shots a unit has when it’s making a ranged attack, you look at individual creatures. By default, however, treat a unit as a single entity.

PLACING TERRAIN You typically place terrain according to what you have available, what sort of battle you might be simulating, and the play styles of the players. As a general rule, Orc Archer leave at least 5

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:58 PM Page 153

normally, the effect reduces the unit’s hit point score. If the unit is reduced to 0 hp, it is eliminated. If it’s reduced low enough that any damage already on the unit is enough to destroy a creature, that creature is eliminated and the damage is removed from the unit. For example, a unit of six Dwarf Axefighters is hit by a fireball spell (20 points of damage). The unit fails its save, reducing UNUSUAL TERRAIN its hp from 30 to 10. From that point on, each 10 points of For a change of pace, you can indamage that the unit takes will cause the loss of one Dwarf vent strange and magical terrain Axefighter. types for your mass battlefields. Conversely, a unit’s reduced hit points can be increased Here are some possibilities. by an area heal effect (such as mass cure light wounds). Quagmire: Impassable. Other forms of healing can also help creatures in Row of Stakes: Slows movement (as difthe unit, but only one at a time. Heal effects that ficult terrain) in one direction but not can raise an individual creature’s the other. hit points back to the creature’s Wall of Force: Impassable; blocks starting amount can affect one line of effect for spells and abilities, creature in the unit. (This but not line of sight. means you have to keep track of Circle of Darkness: Difficult how many creatures in the unit terrain; creatures miss outright have their full hit points and half the time (hit only on 11+ how many have reduced hit on a separate 1d20 roll); blocks points. Damage applies first to line of sight but not line of those with lower hp scores.) effect. Army: The equivalent of a skirLava Pit: Difficult terrain; deals 5 fire dammish warband in the mass battles age to any creature that enters or starts its rules. turn on the terrain. Attached: One commander can be attached to a unit (but not to a lone creature). An attached commander can lead from the front or from the rear. An attached comThe skirmish glossary at the end of Chapter mander leading from the front fights 5: Skirmish Rules explains game terms, as alongside the creatures in the unit. An well as keywords that appear on stat cards. attached commander leading from the It also contains detailed information on Dwarven Defender rear directs the unit it is attached to and certain special abilities that are too long to explain on the possibly directs nearby units. stat cards. A Unique creature (see that entry) can attach to a unit just This glossary is supplemental to the skirmish glossary. Some as a commander can, and can even attack if leading from the glossary entries are unique to the mass battles rules, while others front. are mass battles versions of entries that also appear in the skirAttack: When a unit attacks, it makes a number of attack rolls. mish glossary. This glossary also describes the mass battles rules The number of melee attack rolls (also known as a mass strike) for some special abilities that are written out in full on the stat depends on how many creatures are in melee contact with the cards. If a term doesn’t appear here, it appears in the skirmish enemy. The number of ranged attacks (also known as a volley) glossary and means the same thing in mass battles as it means in depends on how many creatures are in the unit, their size, and the skirmish rules. whether they have a clear line of sight to the target. This glossary uses the same shorthand terms as the skirmish Attack of Opportunity: A free melee attack made by a unit, glossary. usually not on its turn. If an enemy disengages from a unit, that unit makes a single mass strike as an attack of opportunity DEFINITIONS against the disengaging enemy. A unit with Melee Reach gets an The following terms are listed in alphabetical order. attack of opportunity against an enemy that moves to engage it Adjacent: Units are adjacent to all other units they touch and (unless that enemy has Melee Reach with at least the same to all creatures in those units, except possibly commanders leadrating). Attacks of opportunity don’t count against a unit’s attacks ing from the rear. A commander leading from the rear is adjacent for the round. only to its unit and to allied units touching its unit. Attack Roll: Each mass strike or volley usually involves a Any: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A spell or ability that uses this number of simultaneous melee or ranged attack rolls, respectively. word does not follow the usual restriction of targeting only the Battlefield: The play area on which you place terrain cards nearest enemy or nearest ally. For example, the phrase “switch and miniatures. It’s the same as the battle grid in the skirmish positions of any two creatures” can affect any two creatures in rules. line of sight of the caster and within the spell’s range. Beastmaster [#]: Animals and Magical Beasts in your army Any Warband: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A spell or special abilthat are of a level equal to or lower than than a creature’s Beastity with this range affects any one unit. master rating are treated as if they did not have the Difficult Area-Effect Damage: Damage-dealing spells and special special ability. For example, Vadania, Half-Elf Druid, is a comabilities that have an effect with radius 2 or radius 4 deal dammander with the Beastmaster 2 special ability. Vadania could age to all the creatures in a unit. Instead of applying damage inches between pieces of impassable terrain, so that formed units can get through the gap. For special scenarios, you might want to have impassable terrain with a 4-inch gap, which allows unformed units through but not formed units.

CHAPTER 6:

MASS BATTLE RULES Illus. by D. Hanley

MASS BATTLES GLOSSARY

153

MASS BATTLE RULES

CHAPTER 6:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:58 PM Page 154

154

put under command a unit of Hyenas or Wolves (level 2), but not a level 5 Owlbear unit. Most creatures with the Beastmaster special ability are also commanders, but their Commander rating may not be the same as their Beastmaster rating. If a beastmaster is not a commander (or is unable to command), this ability has no effect. Blinded: (Spell/Ability Effect) A blinded unit does not engage units that it is adjacent to (although those units may engage it). Otherwise, this condition works as it does in the skirmish rules. Blind-Fight: Even a unit with Blind-Fight doesn’t engage an enemy unit that is invisible. Otherwise, this special ability works as it does in the skirmish rules. Blindsight: A unit with this special ability sees invisible units and engages them normally. Otherwise this special ability works as it does in the skirmish rules. Burrow [#]: A unit with an attached commander can’t burrow unless the commander can burrow. Otherwise, this special ability works as it does in the skirmish rules. Charge: To charge, a unit moves at double speed to engage the nearest enemy it can see at the start of its turn. If nothing slows it down and it moves at least 2 inches, that unit can make a single mass strike against that enemy with a +2 bonus on its attack rolls. A formed unit can charge only if it moves straight ahead, and it must drift (see that entry) if able and if doing so brings more creatures into melee contact with the enemy unit. An unformed unit must move in a straight line, engage the enemy on its nearest edge, and end up having as many creatures in melee contact as possible. Cleave: Once per mass strike, if a unit with this ability destroys one or more creatures by reducing their hit points to 0 with a mass strike, one of that unit’s creatures can immediately make one extra melee attack roll. Usually, a unit gets only one extra Cleave attack per turn, but if it is attacking multiple enemy units or if the unit can make multiple mass strikes, then it may be able to get more (up to one for each mass strike against a particular unit). If a commander is leading from the front and participating in the attack, treat it as separate from the unit for purposes of Cleave. Both the commander and the unit may get Cleave attacks, but only if they separately meet the requirements. Cloud: (Spell/Ability Effect) A cloud is a type of terrain created by a spell or ability. It is permanent and blocks line of sight, but does not slow movement or block line of effect. However, units inside the cloud are blinded (which may affect their movement) and considered to have the Invisible special ability. Spells whose effect is a cloud, as with other permanent areas of effect, can target any point rather than the nearest enemy or ally. If any part of a unit touches any part of a cloud, the whole unit is considered to be in the cloud, as with any other area of effect. (The area of effect of a cloud represents its “core” rather than precise boundaries.) Sometimes an effect that produces a cloud specifies that it doesn’t block line of sight, in which case it is simply an area of terrain with the noted effect. Command Point: Each commander gets a supply of command points that it can spend each round. The number of command points equals the creature’s Commander rating. Commanders use command points to put units under command, issue special orders, and challenge initiative. You can’t save command points from one round to the next; unspent points are lost. Command points replenish at the beginning of each round. Commander: Commanders may be lone creatures (see that entry) or may attach to units. A commander costs an extra 20 points to purchase for an army.

Commander Effect: A commander’s Commander Effect applies to the unit to which it is attached, if any. If it affects enemies, the Commander Effect applies to all enemy units that the commander engages, provided the commander is leading from the front. Likewise, an unattached commander can use its Commander Effect against enemy units it engages. Conceal [#]: When attacking a unit with the Conceal special ability, roll for each potential hit separately, not for all hits at once. Cone (Spell/Ability Keyword): In mass battles, the area affected by a cone is not determined by using one of the skirmish templates. Instead, the cone targets a single unit within 2 inches. If a cone effect deals damage, it deals double the indicated amount against a unit, or the indicated damage against a lone creature or attached commander. If the cone has a nondamaging effect, such as Stun, it affects up to two creatures in the unit. If creatures assigned to attack an attached commander leading from the front in melee use a cone effect, the cone strikes the commander and the unit to which it is attached. The unit takes normal (not double) damage, or has one creature (not two) affected. Confusion: (Spell/Ability Effect) A unit subject to this effect is confused. A confused unit does not engage enemy units. If some but not all creatures in a unit are confused, the unit’s controller decides whether to have the whole unit be confused or to eliminate the confused creatures. Each time a confused unit activates, roll 1d20 and refer to the following table to determine what it does. d20 1–5

6–15 16–20

Effect A random opponent controls this unit on this turn as if it were that opponent’s unit and as if it had the Difficult 20 ability. If the unit has a commander attached, the commander immediately detaches (but the unit makes no morale save even if the commander was leading from the front). Place the commander adjacent to the unit. If an attached commander is confused, it immediately detaches (triggering a morale save as normal if the commander was leading from the front), and the opponent controlling the commander places the miniature adjacent to its unit. Your other units can make attacks of opportunity against this unit if you wish, but the opponent temporarily controlling the confused unit receives the victory points if it is eliminated while under his or her control. It still counts as one of your activations for the phase. This unit stands still this turn, taking no action. You control this unit normally this turn. Even so, it remains confused until the duration of the effect is over.

A confused commander can’t use command points, and its Commander Effect does not function, but it might be able to remain attached to a unit. Constitution Drain: Each hit a unit with this special ability scores against a living unit deals an additional 5 points of damage (save to reduce the total bonus damage by half ). Each such hit also grants this unit an additional 5 hit points. Countersong: Enemy units engaged by a unit with this special ability cannot benefit from special orders. Commanders engaged by such a unit (or attached to units engaged by the unit) can’t use their Commander Effects. Cover: Certain terrain features provide cover against attacks, granting a +4 bonus to the defender’s AC. A unit making a ranged attack can attack with only those creatures that have a clear shot at a creature in the defending unit. Cowardly: If a unit with this special ability is not within 6 inches of another allied unit after an allied unit is destroyed, it

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:59 PM Page 155

CHAPTER 6:

Illus. by R. Wright

Half Damage: When a unit gets a save for half damage, total the damage first. For example, an Azer Raider unit hits a Troll unit three times, and each hit deals 5 points of fire damage. The Troll unit has the Vulnerable Fire special ability, taking 50% extra damage from fire. The total fire damage increases from 15 to 20 points, so a successful save deals 10 points of damage to the Troll unit. DC [#]: When a save reduces damage, roll once for the unit and apply the result (if the save succeeds) to the total damage dealt. When a save prevents an effect, such as Paralysis, roll for each creature in the affected unit. Death Attack (DC [#]): When a unit with this special ability is about to make a Sneak Attack, it can also attempt to use its Death Attack ability. This attempt must be declared before making the attack. Each melee attack that hits causes the enemy unit to make saves against the indicated DC. On each failed save, one creature is destroyed. (Creatures already destroyed by the damage dealt by the attack count against the number of saves that need to be made.) This ability does not affect creatures that are immune to sneak attacks. Death Burst (ENERGY [#]; DC [#]): When a creature with this special ability is destroyed by damage, its unit and all adjacent units take the given amount of the indicated type of damage. A successful save reduces the damage to half. Death Strike: Each time one or more creatures in a unit with this ability are destroyed by damage, the unit may make one mass strike with a number of melee attacks up to the number of creatures destroyed. Destroy/Destroyed: A creature is destroyed when its hit points drop to 0 or lower. A unit is destroyed when all its component creatures are. Certain spells or effects can also destroy a creature or unit outright. Remove destroyed creatures from the battlefield. A destroyed creature scores victory points for the opponent responsible for its destruction. If a spell or ability (but not a scenario condition) somehow returns a destroyed creature to play, the players who scored victory points for its destruction lose those points.) Difficult [#]: Putting a difficult unit under command costs a number of command points equal to its Difficult rating instead of the usual 1 point. A commander whose Commander rating is not as high as a unit’s Difficult rating can’t attach to that unit. A special order issued to a Difficult unit costs additional command points equal to the creature’s Difficult rating. A difficult unit that is out of command moves at double speed toward the nearest enemy unit as a compulsory action, whether or not it can

MASS BATTLE RULES

makes a morale save. (If it’s a lone creature and it fails the morale save, it routs.) Creature: A unit is made up of creatures. Generally, special effects that apply to creatures with given characteristics also apply to units made up of such creatures. For example, a unit of Construct creatures is immune to Stun effects, just as individual Construct creatures are. Generally, hostile special effects that affect some but not all creatures in a unit either affect the unit as a whole or eliminate the affected creatures (at the defender’s option). For example, you never have some creatures in a unit paralyzed and the others not. Instead, the defender chooses either to have the whole unit paralyzed or to eliminate the paralyzed creatures from the unit so that the survivors can continue to function normally. The opposite is true for spells and special abilities that affect your own units. If the effect applies to fewer than all the creatures in the unit, you decide either to have it affect no creatures in the unit or to eliminate the unaffected units. For example, if you have a unit of five Evoker’s Apprentices cast magic weapon on a Man-at-Arms unit containing six creatures, the spell either has no effect or one Man-at-Arms is eliminated, with the remaining five benefiting. If a unit has taken damage, you can remove the damage by eliminating a creature in this way. (The wounded creature is one of the creatures left out.) If an effect that affects individual creatures can be resolved immediately and you don’t have to keep track of it, then it simply works on some creatures in the unit but not all of them. For example, if a unit of two creatures casts snake’s swiftness on an allied unit of twenty creatures, the allied unit can immediately make a single mass strike in which up to two creatures can attack. If an effect modifies one creature’s scores (such as the doom spell, which reduces a creature’s attack bonus), it usually has no effect on a unit that’s not a lone creature. However, if at least half the creatures in a unit become subject to the same such effect at the same time, the whole unit is considered subject to it. For example, if a Human Blackguard unit containing six creatures casts doom on a unit of eight Orc Warriors, and four of the Orcs fail their saves, the whole Orc Warrior unit is under the doom effect. If only three of the Orcs fail their saves, the spell has no effect on the unit. Damage: Unless otherwise noted, damage is applied to a unit as though it were a single entity. For example, if a unit of twentyfive creatures having 10 hit points takes 35 points of damage, three creatures are removed as casualties, leaving 5 points of “leftover” damage assigned to the unit. Spells and special abilities that deal damage to all creatures in a unit (such as a spell with a radius 4 effect) actually reduce the unit’s overall hit points—each creature in the unit takes damage. When a unit’s damage rating includes the effect of a special ability, such as Ghoul Touch, the ability affects individual creatures in the defending unit—generally, a number of creatures equal to the number of hits scored minus the number of creatures destroyed by those hits. For example, if a Ghoul unit scores four hits against a Sun Soul Initiate unit and destroys one creature, up to three other Initiates could be paralyzed (see the Creature entry for more information).

Shambling Mound

155

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:59 PM Page 156

MASS BATTLE RULES Azer Raider illus. by S. Tappin Halfling Veteran illus. by D. Hanley

CHAPTER 6:

Azer Raider

156

reach that enemy on this turn. It might be able to charge if it meets the conditions, but it has to move toward the enemy even if it can’t charge. Alternatively, a ranged unit can stand still and make a ranged attack (or use a ranged spell or special ability) against that enemy, if it is within range at the start of its turn. Difficult Terrain: Rubble, dense vegetation, and other obstacles slow movement and prevent charges. Units pay double the normal movement cost through areas of difficult terrain. However, a unit has a minimum move of 1 inch. Certain spells turn some areas into difficult terrain. Disengage: When a unit moves away from one or more enemy units that engage it, it makes a morale save with a –4 penalty, and the units from which it is disengaging each make an attack of opportunity against it. The disengaging unit may do nothing but move during this turn, and it must end its movement at least 1 inch away from the units from which it has disengaged. (If it doesn’t disengage, an engaged unit’s only movement option is to shift.) Dominate/Dominated: (Spell/Ability Effect) Certain spells and abilities can dominate an enemy lone or attached creature or a unit, causing it to become a member of your army. Dominate affects only enemy units; it has no effect on allied creatures. You may activate a unit in the round when it becomes dominated only if the opponent hasn’t yet activated it. Treat a dominated unit as part of your army and under your control in most ways. For as long as you control the unit, it counts as eliminated for victory points—even if it is still on the battlefield. If it is destroyed while under your control, you keep the victory points for eliminating it. If some but not all creatures in a unit are dominated, eliminate either the dominated or the undominated creatures, whichever number is fewer, plus an equal number of the remaining creatures. For example, if three creatures in a unit of eight are dominated, eliminate six creatures, leaving two. If a dominated unit has a commander attached, the commander immediately detaches (the unit makes no morale save, even if the commander was leading from the front). The commander’s controller places its miniature adjacent to the dominated unit. If an attached commander is dominated (and the unit it’s attached to isn’t dominated by the same opponent), the commander must immediately detach, triggering a morale save if it was leading from the front. DR [#]: When a unit with Damage Reduction takes normal damage from a melee or ranged attack, subtract the indicated

amount from the damage dealt by each individual hit. This ability otherwise works the same as in the skirmish rules. Drift: Any time a formed unit moves straight ahead more than its speed, such as by making a double move or charging, it can drift (move 1 inch sideways at any point in its path). A formed unit making a charge must drift if doing so brings more of its creatures into melee contact with the enemy unit. Engaged: A unit is engaged by an active enemy unit adjacent to it. Engaged units can’t use ranged attacks or cast spells with a range other than touch. Once engaged, a unit may not move freely; it can only disengage or shift (see those entries). Generally, rules and effects that involve threatening squares in the skirmish rules translate into engaging adjacent enemy units in the mass battles rules. Entangled: (Spell Keyword) An unit subject to an Entangle effect is unable to move unless it makes a successful save against the effect’s indicated DC. Once each turn that it attempts to move, an entangled unit attempts a save. If the save succeeds, it may move. If the save fails, it can’t move during that turn, but counts as if it had moved (so it could make one melee or ranged attack, but not multiple attacks). Entangle effects sometimes create an area of difficult terrain. Even if a unit succeeds on its save, if it is in that area, it must still pay the normal costs for movement through difficult terrain. If some but not all creatures in a unit are entangled, and the unit moves, make one save for the unit. If the save fails, eliminate the entangled creatures. Alternatively, the unit can make one save attempt per turn to free the entangled creatures, but it doesn’t move regardless of the result. Facing: A formed unit has four “faces”: a front, a rear, and two sides. It fights at an advantage to the front and at a disadvantage to the sides and rear. An unformed unit has no facing, but it does have a leading edge (see that entry). File: A column of creatures in a formed unit from front to back. Flanking/Flanked: There is no flanking in the mass battles rules. For purposes of special abilities, a formed unit is considered to “flank” a lone creature that it engages. For example, a lone creature that has Immune Flanking doesn’t take double attacks from a formed unit attacking it.

Halfling Veteran

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:59 PM Page 157

CHAPTER 6:

MASS BATTLE RULES Illus. by D. Hanley

creature (if the amount healed is high enough). It is best for Flight: A creature with the Flight ability can move over restoring damage from area-effect attacks, which reduce a unit’s obstacles as in the skirmish rules. It can even fly over walls. In overall hp (see the Area-Effect Damage entry). addition, it may take a full-round action (see that entry) to fly Heal effects can’t be used on destroyed units, including lone high into the air, causing itself to be phased out (see the Phase or attached creatures. For example, you can’t use a heal effect Out entry in the skirmish glossary). On its turn, a phased out on a unit to bring back the commander that had been attached creature with Flight may take a full-round action to return to any to it. legal position on the battlefield. A heal effect deals the indicated amount of positive damage to Follower: A Commander Effect that refers to followers Undead creatures. The unit gets a save for half damage (DC 12 + applies to the unit to which the commander is attached, if any. It the level of the spell, or if not a spell, the level of the creature proaffects the unit as a whole, not individual creatures within the ducing the heal effect). Constructs are immune to heal effects, unit. For example, if a Commander Effect grants a bonus to folunless the spell or ability specifies otherwise, in which case only lowers that moved before attacking, what matters is whether the Construct creatures are subject to the effect. whole unit moved, not whether individual miniatures may have Helpless: A helpless unit does not engage enemy units. A unit moved around in the unit’s space. can treat a helpless enemy unit as an allied unit when moving. Formed Unit: A number of creatures fighting as a For example, an unformed unit can move through an ungroup in close order. A player decides during deployment formed enemy unit that is helpless. which of his or her units will be formed or unformed, and they Hide: If all the creatures in a unit with this remain so throughout the battle. Only a few types of creatures special ability have partial cover or low cover can make up formed units; all others must be unformed (see against a nonadjacent enemy unit, the unit that entry). Each of a formed unit’s ranks contain up to six is considered to have the Invisible speSmall, five Medium, or four Large creatures. Its depth can cial ability against that enemy unit. never be greater than its width. Formed units, unlike HP: Hit points. A unit has a hit unformed units, have a front, sides, and a rear (see the point rating equal to the hit point rating of the creaFacing entry). It fights at an advantage tures that make up the unit. Every time damage to to the front and at a disadvantage to the the unit accumulates to the point at which it equals side and rear. A formed unit moves the unit’s hp, the unit loses one creature. backward at half speed and can’t move If a unit gains hit points, such as with the Constisideways. It must pivot to change the directution Drain or Feed special abilities, these extra hit tion it faces. points first remove damage from the unit. Hit points Frontage: A creature’s frontage is the porgained in excess of what’s needed to heal the unit tion of its unit’s edge that corresponds to the becomes a “fund” of bonus hit points that absorbs width of the miniature’s base. When enemy units damage the unit later takes. If this fund ever equals 5 are in contact with each other, the frontages of times the number of creatures in the unit, the unit’s their creatuers are offset, not lined up. hit point rating increases by 5, and the fund is reduced Full-Round Action: An action that uses up a by an appropriate amount. For example, if a unit unit’s entire turn. of three Barghests (with the Feed 10 special Gaze Attack: (Replaces attacks: RANGE; ability) has destroyed two Humanoid EFFECTS AND CONDITIONS; DC [#]) creatures, it has a fund of 20 hp. For Instead of making its normal attacks, a three creatures, 15 hp is enough to raise unit with this special ability can use a the unit’s hp score from 35 to 40, with 5 Gaze Attack against the nearest enemy hp left over. Those 5 extra hit points will unit. For each such creature, the tarcancel out the next 5 points of damage that get unit makes one save, and each the unit takes. failed save indicates one creature Illusion: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Some subject to the gaze’s effect. spells and special abilities produce illusions, desigGreat Swing: When a unit with this nating a “square” or “squares” as members of your army. (Such Cleric of Order special ability makes a melee attack, it gets a areas are 1-inch squares.) These are considered to produce perfree mass strike against the same unit (but not manent areas of effect, which must target any area rather than against a lone creature). the nearest unit. Such effects are suspended while that area is Heal [#]: (Spell/Ability Effect) When used on a lone or entirely occupied by a unit. attached creature, a heal effect works as it does in the skirmish This area counts as a member of your army for purposes of rules. When used on a unit of multiple creatures, it works almost determining the nearest enemy. It doesn’t count as a lone creathe same way. If the unit has lost a creature to damage, and the ture, so it can’t be ignored. It does not engage enemy units. amount healed is at least as much as the unit’s hit point rating, Any attack against an illusion automatically succeeds. Any the heal effect restores a destroyed creature to the unit. (This isn’t damage dealt to an illusion, whether by an attack or by a spell raising the dead, but rather restoring an incapacitated creature to or special ability, removes the effect immediately. Spells and good health.) If the unit hasn’t lost a creature, or if the amount abilities that do not deal damage or remove spells have no effect healed is less than the unit’s hit points, then the heal effect on illusions. removes the indicated amount of damage from the unit. Heal Improved Countersong: A unit with this ability is consideffects don’t work on a unit that hasn’t lost a creature to damage ered to have the Countersong ability. In addition, enemy units and that isn’t wounded. that this unit engages cannot be put under command by other Most heal effects restore hit points to lone or attached creacreatures. Enemy commanders attached to these units cannot tures, but some affect creatures in an area. Area-effect healing put other creatures under command. both reduces damage a unit has taken and restores a destroyed

157

MASS BATTLE RULES Illus. by S. Tappin

CHAPTER 6:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 2:59 PM Page 158

158

In an Area: A unit is “in” an area if any of its space occupies any part of the area. Incorporeal: When rolling to avoid damage for a unit with this special ability, roll for each successful hit, each spell, and so on. An incorporeal unit can freely move away from enemy units engaging it; it does not have to disengage (with the penalties and restrictions that disengaging entails) unless it is engaged by a unit that also has the Incorporeal ability. Otherwise this special ability works as it does in the skirmish rules. Independent: A unit with this special ability is always under command. Invisible: (Spell/Ability Effect) A unit does not engage an invisible unit (unless it can “see” the unit somehow, such as with the Blindsight special ability). Large: Large creatures can make up formed units of up to nine creatures, or unformed units of up to four. Up to four Large creatures in an unformed unit can make a ranged attack. Leading Edge: While an unformed unit doesn’t have a front, you still arrange the miniatures in its space so that they’re all as close as possible to one edge, which then becomes that unit’s leading edge. This rule simply keeps the unit compact (so you can’t arrange miniatures in an L, T, or X configuration). Leading from the Front: An attached commander leads either from the front or from the rear. While leading from the front, a commander can spend command points only on the unit to which it’s attached, and it can fight with the unit. Leading from the Rear: An attached commander leads either from the front or from the rear. While leading from the rear, a commander can spend command points on allied units within 6 inches, and it does not fight with its unit. Line: (Spell/Ability Keyword) Trace a 12-inch line starting at the acting unit’s Evoker’s Apprentice space and touching the target unit’s space. The line affects all units it touches. If a line effect deals damage, it deals double the indicated amount to each unit (or the indicated damage to a lone or attached creature). If the line has a nondamaging effect, it affects up to two creatures in a unit. If creatures assigned to attack an attached commander leading from the front in melee use a line effect, the line strikes the commander and the unit to which it is attached. The unit takes normal (not double) damage, or has one creature (not two) affected. Line of Sight: A unit that can see another unit has line of sight to it. Certain kinds of terrain, such as walls, block line of sight, as do effects such as the Invisible special ability. A unit has line of sight to another if at least one creature in the first unit has a clear view of at least one creature in the other unit. A clear view is prevented by any terrain that blocks line of sight and that intervenes even partially between the two creatures. (This is different from the skirmish rules, where two creatures don’t need a clear view to have line of sight to each other.) Lone Creature: A unit consisting of one creature. Commanders attached to units don’t count as lone creatures. The acting player may ignore lone creatures for purposes of determining the nearest enemy or ally, but does not have to. A lone creature

makes a morale check the first time its hit points are reduced to one-half its starting amount, and it routs if it fails any morale save. Mass Strike: The equivalent of a melee attack for a unit. A mass strike generally lets several of the unit’s creatures make melee attack rolls. The number of creatures allowed to attack is determined by how many of them are in melee contact with the enemy. If a unit is made up of creatures with multiple melee attacks, it may make multiple mass strikes if it doesn’t move. If a unit makes multiple mass strikes and is attacking more than one enemy unit, resolve all the mass strikes against one unit before starting a mass strike against another unit. Sometimes a special ability (such as Death Strike) or a spell (such as snake’s swiftness) allows a unit to make a mass strike with a certain number of attack rolls. In this case, the rules for melee contact still limit the number of attacks that the unit can make. For example, if Death Strike allows a unit to make a mass strike with five attack rolls, but only three creatures are in melee contact with an enemy, the unit gets only three attack rolls. Often, the rules simply refer to a unit making a “melee attack,” which means making a mass strike and involves multiple attack rolls. Medium: Medium creatures can make up formed units of up to twenty-five creatures, or unformed units of up to nine. Up to six Medium creatures in an unformed unit can make a ranged attack. Melee Attack: When a unit makes a melee attack, it’s sometimes called a mass strike. A limited number of creatures in the attacking unit can each make melee attack rolls. If the creatures in a unit can make multiple melee attacks, then the unit can make multiple mass strikes, provided it doesn’t move. Melee Contact: Creatures are in melee contact with enemy creatures whose frontage touches their own. A formed unit can make a number of attack rolls equal to the number of its creatures in melee contact with the enemy unit, plus one for each adjacent creature in the same rank as those creatures (or in the same file, if the attack is to the unit’s side). An unformed unit can make a number of attack rolls equal to the number of its creatures in melee contact with the enemy unit, plus one for each creature adjacent to an empty space that’s in contact with the enemy unit. Melee Reach [#]: A unit with this special ability has two advantages. First, it gets an attack of opportunity against an enemy unit that moves to engage it. The moving unit avoids the attack of opportunity if it has a Melee Reach rating at least as high as the defender’s. The moving unit takes the attack of opportunity and applies any results before making its own attack. (So a unit routed by the attack of opportunity, for example, doesn’t make its attack.) Second, a formed unit with Melee Reach gets extra attack rolls when attacking to the front. Creatures in the second rank are considered to be in melee contact as though they were in the front rank. A Large unit, however, gets these extra attacks only if its Melee Reach rating is 3 or higher. (Melee Reach 2 isn’t enough to let the second rank of creatures reach past the Large creatures in the front rank.) An unformed unit does not get extra melee attacks for having Melee Reach.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:00 PM Page 159

CHAPTER 6:

Illus. by S. Tappin

any special movement mode of the moving unit, such as Flight or Burrow. By contrast, ranged attacks and effects ignore terrain that does not block line of sight and line of effect. If two or more enemies are at the same distance, the acting player can choose any of them as nearest. The acting player may ignore lone creatures for purposes of determining the nearest enemy, but does not have to. On Terrain: Same as “in” terrain (see that entry). Out of Command: Some special abilities, such as Executioner’s Blade, affect units that are out of command. If a unit has been put under command in this round, it’s considered to be under command for the rest of the round. If it hasn’t been put under command yet, a commander can put it under command as an immediate action to keep it from counting as out of command. When the unit activates later, it will still be under command. Paralysis: (Spell/Ability Effect) Paralysis can affect entire units or lone or attached creatures. When some but not all creatures in a unit are paralyzed, the unit’s controller chooses either to have the whole unit paralyzed or to eliminate the paralyzed creatures. For example, a Ghoul unit gets five hits on a Sun Soul Initiate unit, destroys one creature, and forces the unit to make four saves. The Sun Soul Initiate unit fails two saves, so its controller must choose either to eliminate an additional two creatures or to have the whole unit be paralyzed. Poison (EFFECT; DC [#]): If a Poison effect in the skirmish rules deals damage “whenever poisoned creature activates,” then in the mass battle rules it simply deals extra damage immediately. Total the Poison damage from the attack. The defending unit takes that extra damage unless it succeeds on a save, in which case it takes half that extra damage. If Poison causes an effect, such as Paralysis, each hit that doesn’t destroy a defending creature requires the unit to make a save or have a creature become subject to that effect. For example, if a Thri-Kreen Ranger unit scores two hits with its Poison attacks on an enemy unit and destroys one creature through damage, the enemy unit must make one save or have one creature become paralyzed. (The defending player then chooses either to have the unit as a whole be paralyzed or to eliminate the paralyzed creature.) Pounce: When charging, a unit with this special ability can make multiple mass strikes as if it hadn’t moved. Push/Pull: (Spell/Ability Effect) Certain spells or abilities push other units away from (or pull them toward) the creature(s) using the spell or ability. The pushed or pulled unit cannot move into or through a space occupied by any other unit, or through walls. Pushed or pulled units that were engaged are moved without having to disengage (and thus avoid related consequences).

MASS BATTLE RULES

Mighty Rock Throwing: When a unit with this special ability makes a ranged attack, it gets two free volleys against the same unit (but not against a lone creature). Mighty Swing: When a unit with this special ability makes any normal melee attack (including an attack of opportunity), it gets two free mass strikes against the same unit (but not against a lone creature). It gets only one free mass strike against a unit with two creatures in it. Minimum Move: A unit can always take a full-round action to move 1 inch, regardless of difficult terrain. (This rule doesn’t allow a unit to move through impassable terrain or to move when all moveMinotaur ment is prohibited, such as while it is paralyzed or engaged.) Morale Save: Normally, a failed morale save causes a normal unit to become shaken and a shaken unit to rout. Commanders can grant bonuses to units’ morale saves by being attached to the units or by issuing special orders to them. A unit makes a morale save when it takes its first casualty, when it first falls to half strength, when it disengages, when it becomes unformed (if it was formed), or when an attached commander stops leading from the front. It also makes a morale save if it takes a casualty from a charge, or if it charges without causing a casualty; in either case, the unit makes an extra morale save if the enemy unit’s level is at least 5 higher than its own. A lone creature that fails a morale saves routs instead of becoming shaken. A unit that fails a morale save caused by a spell or special ability routs instead of becoming shaken, regardless of its previous morale state. When a commander attempts to rally a shaken unit, its morale state doesn’t change if it fails the morale save. Mounted Melee Attack: When moving at double speed (but not making a charge), a unit with this special ability can make a single mass strike at any point in its path and can disengage from the unit that it attacked without having to make a morale save. Mounted Ranged Attack: When moving at double speed (but not making a charge), a unit with this special ability can fire a single volley at any point in its path. Move Action: An action that is the equivalent of a unit moving its speed. A unit may replace its attacks with a move action, allowing it to move up to double speed. Sometimes special actions, spells, or effects replace one or both move actions. (For example, it’s a move action for a commander to attach to a unit.) Nearest Ally: This works like nearest enemy (see that entry) but applies to allied units. Nearest Enemy: The nearest enemy to a specific unit is the nearest enemy to which it has line of sight (see that entry). Another enemy that is closer, but out of line of sight, does not qualify as the nearest. When charging, count the distance to the enemy taking into account any movement costs for terrain and

159

MASS BATTLE RULES Illus. by D. Hanley

CHAPTER 6:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:00 PM Page 160

160

strikes, use the attacks that dealt the two highest numbers of hits Push: A unit pushed away from another unit must move in a to determine how many rends it scores. straight line and end up farther away from the pushing unit. Resist [#] ENERGY: Apply this resistance to each creature Pull: A unit pulled toward another unit must move in a straight damaged (or that would be damaged) in a unit. For example, a line and end up closer to the pulling unit. lightning bolt spell deals 60 points of damage against a Kuo-Toa If an effect states you may “push or pull,” the target can end up unit. Each Kuo-Toa has 10 hp and Resist 5 Electricity. Thus, each closer to, farther from, or the same distance from the unit proKuo-Toa takes 15 points of damage to destroy, so four creatures ducing the effect. are eliminated rather than six. When some but not all creatures in a unit are pushed or pulled, If an attack deals area-effect damage to all the creatures in a the defending player chooses between having the whole unit unit, Resist Energy protects each one. For instance, if a fireball affected or eliminating the affected creatures. spell deals 10 points of damage to an Abyssal Maw unit (with Radius 2, Radius 4: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A range given in Resist 10 Acid, Cold, Fire), the unit takes no damage and its hit the description of certain spells and abilities. The spell or special point rating is not reduced. ability affects the entire unit plus any enemy units engaging or Routing: If an effect, such as a cause fear spell, forces some engaged by the unit. Damage-dealing effects deal but not all creatures in a unit to rout, the controller chooses area-effect damage, reducing the unit’s hit between having the whole unit rout or eliminating the routpoints. If it has a nondamaging effect, it affects ing creatures. the entire unit, which gets a single save (if Save: When an entire unit is subject to an any) to resist the effect. effect, such as a fireball spell, make one save Ranged Attack: When a unit makes a for the unit. When the creatures in a unit are ranged attack, the attack is sometimes subject to multiple individual effects, such as called a volley. The maximum distance Hound Archon Stunning Attacks against the unit, make a sepafor such attacks is 24 inches unless rate save for each creature affected. otherwise noted. Engaged units canScout: You may deploy a unit with this special abilnot make ranged attacks. Only a cerity anywhere on the board but at least 12 inches from tain number of creatures in an unformed the other players’ deployment zones. unit can take part in a ranged attack: See: Some effects refer to spaces that a eight Small creatures, six Medium creacreature can “see,” such as the Hound tures, or four Large creatures. If the Archon’s dimension door spell. As with creatures in a unit can make multiple sight range, this is limited to 24 inches ranged attacks, then the unit can make in the mass battles rules. multiple volleys provided it doesn’t move. Selective Shot [#]: A unit with this Spells and special abilities that work at range, such as special ability can target its ranged attack Gaze Attacks, Breath Weapons, and most spells, are limagainst an enemy unit other than the ited in the same way as ranged attacks. nearest one. With Selective Shot 2, it can Ranged Sneak Attack +[#]: This ability works target the nearest or second nearest enemy. like Sneak Attack (see that entry), but the attacker With Selective Shot 3, it can also choose to must make a ranged attack and be within 6 inches, target the third nearest, and so on. A comand it cannot affect lone creatures engaged by a mander can improve this targeting discretion formed unit if none of the other required condiby issuing a special order, as with other tions apply. units making ranged attacks. Rear: A formed unit has a –4 penalty on attacks to the rear, Shaken: A unit (other than a lone a –4 penalty to Armor Class against melee attacks from the creature) with normal morale that fails rear, and a –4 penalty on morale saves when engaged on a morale save is shaken but not routing. the rear. A shaken unit takes a –2 penalty on Regeneration [#]: A unit with this special ability attacks, saves, and Armor Class. A shaken can recover hit points lost to normal damage unit cannot move to where an enemy unit engages it. assigned to it. If the unit’s hit point rating has (If it’s already engaged, however, it does not need to been reduced by area-effect damage, then disengage.) It can still move to engage an enemy unRegeneration restores the unit’s hit point rating formed unit. Being shaken is a fear-related effect, so as a whole (rather than any damage assigned to creatures that have the Fearless special ability are immune it). Regeneration doesn’t restore destroyed creato being shaken. tures to a unit. Shot on the Run: A unit with this special ability can move, Rend [#]: When a unit with this special abilmake a single volley, then move again, as long as the distance it ity is a lone creature fighting a lone creature, this ability moves during its turn doesn’t exceed its speed. works the same as in the skirmish rules. Otherwise, use the Side: A formed unit takes a –2 penalty on attacks to the side, a following rules in mass battles. –2 penalty to AC against melee attacks from the side, and a –2 When a unit with this ability makes two mass strikes during penalty on morale saves when engaged on the side. its turn, it can deal extra damage. It scores “rends” equal to the Sight: Special abilities and spells with a range of sight are limnumber of hits in the mass strike that scored the fewer hits. Each ited to 24 inches in the mass battles rules. rend deals 5 extra points of damage instead of the indicated Skips Next Turn: (Spell/Ability Effect) On its next turn, a amount. For example, if a Troll unit scores two hits with its first unit subject to this effect activates but may take no actions. It is mass strike and four hits with its second, it scores two rends and still considered active. It still engages enemy units normally and deals an extra 10 points of damage. can make attacks of opportunity. If a unit with the Rend ability makes more than two mass

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:16 PM Page 161

CHAPTER 6:

Illus. by D. Hanley

attacks of opportunity. A stunned unit stops being stunned at the end of its next turn (in other words, it loses one chance to act). It can still make morale saves normally. If some but not all creatures in a unit are stunned, the controller chooses between having the whole unit be stunned or eliminating the stunned units. A stunned commander can’t put other creatures under command or issue special orders, and its Commander Effect does not function. However, it can still make morale saves normally. Summon: (Spell Keyword) A summon spell (such as summon monster or summon nature’s ally) brings a creature or creatures matching specified restrictions onto the battlefield within 6 inches of the summoner. This effect otherwise works as it does in the skirmish rules. Switch Position: (Spell/Ability Effect) This effect usually affects only individual creatures (whether lone, attached, or in a unit). A creature switched out of a unit becomes a lone creature that can’t activate until the next round. If it switches positions with a creature that had been in a unit, it appears adjacent to that unit and can’t activate until the next round. A few spells and special abilities cause the unit using the ability to switch positions with its target, or to cause two other units to switch places. If the two units occupy spaces of the same size, simply swap their locations on the battlefield. If the units switching places occupy spaces of different sizes, they can switch positions only if there is a legal placement for the larger unit. Each unit must end up on at least part of the space the other unit occupied. The player who controls the effect controls the exact location, so long as it is a legal position. Being switched while engaged by an enemy unit is not disengaging and involves none of the Dwarf Axefighter consequences for disengaging. Attached creatures may not have their postions switched by enemies. Tactics: A unit with this special ability doesn’t count against the number

MASS BATTLE RULES

If some but not all creatures in a unit skip their next turn, the controller chooses between having the whole unit skip its next turn or phasing out the creatures. The phased out creatures must return to play at the end of their unit’s next turn; they are permanently eliminated if their unit was eliminated or has moved in the meantime. Sleep: (Spell/Ability Effect) If some but not all creatures in a unit are sleeping, those left awake can awaken the others. The unit’s controller chooses either to have the whole unit skip its next turn (while some creatures wake up others) or to eliminate the sleeping creatures. A unit can take a standard action to remove Sleep from one adjacent sleeping unit (replacing its attacks). Sleep effects are also removed immediately when a sleeping unit takes damage. Small: Small creatures can make up formed units of up to thirty-six creatures, or unformed units of up to sixteen. Up to eight Small creatures in an unformed unit can make ranged attacks as part of a volley. Sneak Attack +[#]: A unit with this special ability gains the indicated bonus on its melee damage if the defending unit is stunned, helpless, or unable to see the attacker. The unit also gains the bonus against a lone creature, but not if the attacking unit itself is a lone creature. (An attached creature leading a unit from the front can use its Sneak Attack special ability against a lone creature.) Space: The amount of space on the battlefield a unit occupies. A unit containing the maximum number of creatures occupies a square 5 inches on a side. A unit’s space is defined by its maximum width and depth. Units are 5 inches wide until they have so few creatures that they no longer span 5 inches (three Small creatures, two Medium creatures, or one Large creature). Spell: As with ranged attacks, only a limited number of creatures in a unit can cast ranged spells. The creatures have to cast the same spell at the same target unit (or other target). Use of a spell counts against the unit’s limit even if not all the creatures participated in casting it. An attached creature casts spells, if at all, separately from its unit. Spell Resistance: When a unit with Spell Resistance is hit by a spell, roll once for the unit even if the spell affects multiple creatures. When the unit is hit by multiple spells, make one roll per spell. Spring Attack: A unit with this special ability can move, make a mass strike, then move again, as long as the distance it moves during its turn doesn’t exceed its speed. If it moves away from a unit that engages it, it provokes an attack of opportunity normally and must end at least 1 inch away from that unit, but it does not need to make a morale save. Square: Rules text that refers to “squares” converts to inches in the mass battles rules. For example, the Sidestep ability refers to a creature moving only 1 square, which means a unit moving 1 inch in the mass battles rules. Statue: Statues, such as those created by a spell or a Medusa’s gaze, have no effect in mass battles—units may move freely through them with no penalties. If a creature transformed into a statue is returned to the battlefield, place it in an unoccupied space as near as possible to where it was when it turned into a statue. Stun: (Spell/Ability Effect) If all the creatures in a unit are subject to this effect, the unit is stunned. If the Stun effect has a save DC, then a successful save negates the effect. A stunned unit can’t move, attack, or take standard actions, but it is not helpless. A stunned unit takes a –2 penalty to Armor Class. It isn’t active, doesn’t engage enmy units, and can’t make

161

MASS BATTLE RULES Illus. by S. Tappin

CHAPTER 6:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:16 PM Page 162

162

of units you have to activate in a round or against the number you can activate in a phase, just like a commander. Target Creature: Spells and special abilities that affect “target creatures” can target individual creatures within a unit. (See the Creature entry, above, for how this works in the mass battles rules.) Threaten: “Engage an enemy unit” in the mass battles rules is roughly equivalent to “threaten an enemy’s square” in the skirmish rules. Touch: (Spell/Ability Keyword) A touch-range spell usually affects an individual creature. (See the Creature entry, above, for how this works in the mass battles rules.) Use the rules for melee contact to see how many creatures in a unit can use a touch-range attack against an enemy unit. Any number of creatures in a unit can use a touch-range effect on an adjacent allied unit. Trample [#] (DC [#]): Once during its turn, a unit with this special ability can move through one enemy unit’s space. It moves to engage the unit, converges, and draws an attack of opportunity from the unit that’s about to be trampled; it then moves through (but not onto) the unit. The defending unit takes the indicated amount of melee damage from each creature that moved through its space, or half that much on a successful save. Trampling doesn’t count as the unit’s attack for the turn. Tyrannical Morale +[#]: (Commander Effect) If a commander you control has this special ability, you can give the unit to which it’s attached an additional bonus on its morale save equal to the indicated amount. However, if the save fails, that unit is destroyed instead of becoming shaken or routing. The opponent whose unit triggered the morale save or originally caused the unit to rout receives victory points for eliminating the creatures. Unformed Unit: A number of creatures fighting as a group but not in close order. A player decides during deployment which of his or her units will be formed or unformed, and they remain so throughout the battle. Only a few types of creatures can make up formed units (see that entry); all others must be unformed. Unformed units have no facing and no true ranks. An unformed unit can have up to sixteen Small, nine Medium, or four Large creatures. Unique: A creature with this special ability is one of a kind and has a given name, such as Tordek, Dwarf Fighter. A creature with the Unique special ability is sometimes referred to as a character. You cannot have more than one Unique creature with the same given name in your army. For example, Tordek, Dwarf Fighter and Tordek, Dwarf Champion both count as “Tordek”; you can only have one or the other in your army. Each of your opponents and teammates can have their own copy of a Unique creature. Unique creatures can attach to units just as commanders do, and they can attack if “leading” from the front. Lacking a Commander rating, they provide no other benefits to the unit, but they trigger no morale save for changing their attachment. Unit: A group of one or more creatures that act together. The creatures must all have the same name, with the exception of an attached commander (if any). Unless attached to a unit, a creature all by itself is its own unit, called a lone creature. Volley: The equivalent of a ranged attack for a unit. A volley generally lets several of the unit’s creatures make ranged attack rolls. The number of creatures allowed to attack is determined by their size, whether or not the unit is unformed, whether a creature has clear line of sight to a target. If the unit is made up of creatures with multiple ranged attacks, it may make multiple volleys if it doesn’t move.

Ember, Human Monk

Often, the rules simply refer to a unit making a “ranged attack,” which means making a volley and involves multiple attack rolls. Vulnerable DAMAGE TYPE: This ability generally works the same way it does in the skirmish rules, increasing damage by one-half (round down). Combine all the damage from separate, simultaneous attacks before the increase. For example, if a Mummy unit (with Vulnerable Fire) is struck by one lesser fire orb spell (5 points of fire damage), it takes 5 points of damage. If it’s struck by four lesser fire orb spells (20 points of fire damage total), it takes 30 points of damage. Wall: Walls and solid stone block movement and line of sight. A unit can’t move or make a ranged attack through a wall. Count around walls to see if commanders are close enough to influence the creatures in their army. Wandering Monster: Deploy a unit with this special ability randomly, as follows. Place the unit in the middle of the board, randomly determine a player, then roll 1d20. The unit’s center is 1d12 inches in a random direction from that player’s starting point: d20 1–5 6–10 11–15 16–20

Direction Closer Farther Left Right

Whirlwind Attack: On its turn, if a unit with this special ability has moved 1 inch or less, each of its creatures can make two melee attack rolls (except for attacks against lone or attached creatures). Wounded: A unit that has some damage assigned to it (but not enough to cause a casualty) is said to be wounded. Your Warband: (Spell/Ability Keyword) An effect with the range “your warband” can affect allied units within 6 inches.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:16 PM Page 163

Illus. by D. Hanley

his chapter describes another use for your miniatures and stat cards: creating and playing in quick random dungeons. You can play the dungeon over and over, and it’s different every time. To keep it interesting, scale the power level of the dungeon up or down to match the party’s abilities. You can even run a random dungeon without a Dungeon Master (details are provided later in this chapter). You can play in one of these “dungeon delves” when you and a friend or two have some spare time. Or, if you enjoy it, you can string together one delve after another, in a simple and easy dungeoneering campaign. A miniatures-oriented random dungeon has three parts: a tactical map, the miniatures of the monsters, and the stat cards corresponding to those miniatures collected together in a “dungeon deck.” The players move their miniatures across the map, and the DM draws cards from the deck to construct encounters. Once you have a dungeon deck built, you can play over and over again without further preparation. You can run characters from your regular D&D game through a random dungeon, but it’s usually better to create new characters not connected to your ongoing campaign. Then you can concentrate on having fun and not worry about effects that could upset a campaign, such as experience points, magic items, and character death. A random dungeon makes a good change of pace when you don’t have time or don’t have all the players you need to play your regular game.

A BASIC RANDOM DUNGEON

Here’s a simple dungeon delve suitable for 1st-level characters. It uses the most basic rules—you can run it as is, even without reading the rest of this chapter. When you create your own dungeons, you can use this one as a guideline or add in any of the options discussed in the rest of this chapter. Characters: This dungeon is for a party of around four 1st-level characters. Map: Use the dungeon battle grid from the Dungeon Master’s Guide. The DM indicates where doors are as the party explores the dungeon. (Make the doors 2 squares wide so that characters and creatures can move through them easily.) Dungeon Deck: This dungeon deck contains twenty-one stat cards. If you don’t have all the creatures on the list below, you can use other creatures instead, as long as they have the same CRs. For best results, swap an entire set of creatures for a different set. For instance, if you have only two skeletons, it’s better to replace the entire set of six Skeleton cards with four Zombie cards or two Wolf Skeleton cards, rather than using the two skeletons you have and adding in something else.

163

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:17 PM Page 164

RANDOM DUNGEONS

CHAPTER 7:

# Card Title 6 Skeleton 4 Human Bandit 4 Orc Warrior 2 Ghoul 2 Gnoll 2 Lizardfolk 1 Worg 21 total cards

CR 1/3 1/2 1/2 1 1 1 2

Play: Pick a room on the map to serve as the entrance to the dungeon and start the characters there. The PCs arrange themselves in front of the door leading out of the room. The encounter starts when the PCs open the door. The DM randomly determines the creatures in the encounter (see below). Everyone rolls for initiative. After the combat is over, the party finds a treasure. Roll on Table 7–1: Random Dungeon Treasures (near the end of this chapter). Creatures that have been killed are left on the battle grid, knocked over, to indicate which rooms have already been conquered. The players take the stat cards for the creatures they’ve defeated to keep track of their progress. Then they go to the next door. Encounters: To randomly determine an encounter, the DM shuffles the dungeon deck, cuts it, and draws four cards. If more than one card of a particular creature is drawn, those creatures can go together to make an encounter. Use the card or cards that make the toughest encounter. (For example, if you get three Orc Warrior cards and one Gnoll card, use the orcs. If you get three Orc Warrior cards and one Worg card, use the worg.) If there’s a tie for what would make the toughest encounter, use the encounter with the most creatures. (For example, if you draw two Orc Warrior cards, one Skeleton card, and one Lizardfolk card, use the orcs.) If there’s a tie for which encounter has the most creatures, use the creatures you drew first. Shuffle unused cards back into the deck. Winning: If the characters defeat monsters whose CRs total 8 or more, they win. If the characters are killed before they defeat monsters whose CRs total 8 or more, they lose. The possibility of losing (having all the characters killed) is much higher in a random dungeon than in a standard D&D game, but if the players lose they can always try again with new characters!

CREATING A DUNGEON DELVE

The preceding section describes how easy it can be to run a dungeon delve—but there’s a lot more you can do to spice it up. Rooms can have interesting features, creatures can have particular habits, and encounters can unfold in unusual ways. You can run dungeon delve campaigns, and even play without a DM.

CONSIDERATIONS

164

When creating your dungeon delve, you’ll want to keep several factors in mind. All the topics mentioned here are covered in more detail throughout this chapter. Creatures: You should have around twenty creatures for your dungeon. The creatures need to be about the right CR for the dungeon level—you don’t want CR 7 creatures in a 1stlevel dungeon. The dungeon is most fun if some monsters form groups (such as reptilian creatures or undead), which allow creatures of different kinds to be encountered together. Wandering Monsters: Wandering monsters introduce a sense of urgency to the dungeon—the PCs want to keep moving on, so they can achieve their objective without wasting time and

resources on meaningless encounters. Wandering monsters affect the use of traps and checks to open doors, and they might require the construction of a separate deck. Special Cards: If you introduce special cards, you’ll have to make them yourself. That means some cards in your deck will look different from the stat cards. You may want to purchase opaque-backed card sleeves to keep card information hidden. Objective: The standard objective is to defeat creatures whose CRs add up to a certain number, but many special cards and encounter types (such as bosses and statues) provide alternative objectives. Playing without a DM: You can play without a DM, but someone will have to prepare the dungeon. Also, you’ll need to make decisions ahead of time on questions such as who makes rolls for the monsters.

THE DUNGEON DECK

The heart of a random dungeon is the array of miniatures representing the denizens and the deck of cards that goes with them. Choose twenty or so miniatures for your dungeon. Some should stand alone as encounters while others may be part of a group. The basic dungeon outlined in the preceding text has monsters encountered together only if they are the same creature. For a more interesting dungeon deck, create groups to allow different creatures to be encountered together (see Groups, below).

CONSTRUCTING YOUR DECK Each miniature for your dungeon is represented by a card in your dungeon deck. In addition, you may want to add cards for special encounters, events, and items.

Dungeon Level The first step in constructing your deck is to give your dungeon a level rating. This is the same as the level of the party you expect to delve into the dungeon. Choose monsters that make encounters of an EL appropriate to the party. In making your choices, create a mix of creatures with Challenge Ratings close to the level of the dungeon. Go ahead and be aggressive. A random dungeon is more fun when it’s tougher than normal. The whole point is to have fun in a short period of time, not to nurture characters to high level over the course of years. If characters die, that’s all right. A tough challenge is more fun than a cakewalk, especially if the players don’t care about the characters’ long-term career goals.

Groups A group is a collection of creatures that might be encountered together. You make up groups as you see fit, depending on how you’d like creatures to be encountered in your dungeon. Whenever two or more creatures of the same group are drawn together for an encounter, they all work together against the party. By default, identical creatures always form a group. However, you can expand the definition of “group” to include other criteria. A group might be based on a creature type or subtype. For example, you could say that “undead” is a group. If you drew a Ghoul card and a Skeleton card from the dungeon deck, those creatures would be encountered together. You can also create groups based on alignment (all lawful evil creatures are part of the same group, for example) or factions that you invent, representing different gangs or camps within the dungeon. If you have a theme or a back story for your dungeon, you can even create strange groups to reflect

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:17 PM Page 165

that. For example, maybe in your dungeon a tribe of ogres use trained wolves as guard animals. Ogres and wolves, then, would belong to the same group. Not all creatures belong to groups. You might put one or more single creatures in the deck that don’t form part of any group.

Modified and Additional Cards

SPECIAL ENCOUNTER TYPES Most encounters are just normal monsters that follow the normal rules for constructing encounters. You can apply special rules, however, by modifying the stat card. (See Modified and Additional Cards, above, for tips on how to mark cards.) In general, a typical dungeon deck made with twenty or so stat cards should include three or four stat cards modified to create special encounters. If you have a theme or idea behind your dungeon deck, you might include more special cards to reflect that theme. Boss: The adventurers have found the evil mastermind who lives in the dungeon, the villain they have come to destroy. When you put a boss into your dungeon deck, destroying this creature is the point of the delve. If you’re playing a one-shot delve, the players win if they kill the boss and lose if they fail. If you’re playing a random dungeon campaign, the PCs get full experience for a delve in which they’ve defeated the boss and half experience for a delve in which they fail to defeat this villain. Put only one boss in the deck. You don’t want the boss to show up right away—the delve would be over before it had the chance to pick up steam. When you first draw the boss, the characters catch a glimpse of it as it escapes. (Most bosses take this opportunity to utter a taunt such as “You’ve fallen into my trap, foolish adventurers— never again shall you see the light of day!” and then laugh maniacally before slipping out through a secret door.) Draw a replacement for the boss card and shuffle the boss back into the deck with the other cards that have not been used yet. A really tricky boss might escape twice before finally confronting the adventurers. Another way to handle the boss is to leave the card out of the deck at the beginning of the dungeon. After the PCs have defeated one or two designated monsters, the boss gets shuffled into the deck. Suppose the boss is a Drow Cleric of Lolth. There may be four drow fighters (minions of the cleric) in the dungeon deck. Once three of the minions have been killed, the boss gets shuffled in. That way, the characters always meet the minions first. The boss can also be a lurker or one of a pair of twins (see those entries, below). Making it a twin increases the odds that it will appear later in the delve rather than earlier. Enemy: The adventurers have interCarrion Crawler rupted a fight between the lone survivor of

CHAPTER 7:

Stat cards have information on both sides: one for the miniatures rules and the other for the roleplaying rules. As a result, if you simply draw cards from the top of the deck, the players will always be able to tell what’s coming next. Furthermore, if you add homemade cards to the deck, your players will see those cards ahead of time when one of them reaches the top of the deck. Opaque-backed card sleeves are a convenient way of hiding information. You can shuffle once at the beginning of the game and draw all cards from the top of the deck. If you don’t have card sleeves, you can avoid this problem simply by not drawing from the top of the deck. Instead, before each encounter, shuffle and cut the deck, then draw your encounter

In addition to the dungeon deck, you may also want to add a wandering monster deck (see Wandering Monsters). Wandering monsters encourage the party to act fast. The PCs never know when another foul beast could be lurking around the corner, so they had best hurry to reach their objective. You might also want to build an “upgrade” deck, which provides more powerful cards that you add to make the dungeon deck stronger (see Evolving the Dungeon Deck).

Illus. by D. Hanley

Drawing Cards from the Deck

Side Decks

RANDOM DUNGEONS

If you like, you can modify stat cards and create special cards to put in your dungeon. Modified cards change the nature of an encounter (see Special Encounter Types) or the behavior of the creatures (see Creature Habits). Special cards can further randomize the nature of encounters and introduce traps and items to the dungeon (see Special Cards). You can modify a creature card directly (by simply writing “boss,” “enemy,” or “×3” on it with a pen), or you can use a small label or piece of tape. If you use card sleeves, you can mark the sleeve or apply a label to it so that you don’t damage the card. Finally, if the modification applies to a unique creature, you can simply make a note of the modification elsewhere. For example, if you have only one Drow Cleric of Lolth card in your deck, you can simply remember that that creature is the boss. You’ll have to make your special cards from scratch. It’s probably easiest to use index cards trimmed to the same size as the stat cards. You can purchase card sleeves—the type sold in hobby shops for trading card games—that protect the cards you use in your dungeon deck. Sleeves with opaque backs hide the identities of the cards in the deck, making it easier to integrate homemade cards.

cards from the middle. This way, no one knows what cards will appear in the encounter until they are drawn.

165

RANDOM DUNGEONS Illus. by A. Smith

CHAPTER 7:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:17 PM Page 166

166

A lurker makes any encounter more challenging.

an evil adventuring party and the monsters that have finished off the adventurer’s allies. The survivor fights both the monsters and the good adventurers. When you draw an enemy, set it aside. Draw an additional card to replace it, then determine the encounter as normal. The enemy appears in the room with the other creatures, but it is not on those creatures’ side. Evil NPCs can be enemies, as can various monsters. Generally, an enemy is the only creature of its kind in the dungeon deck. An enemy’s CR can be at the dungeon level, above it, or below it. A stronger enemy can do more damage to the monsters—but can do more damage to the party as well. Friend: The adventurers have interrupted a fight between the lone survivor of an adventuring party and the monsters that have finished off the adventurer’s allies. The survivor joins the adventurers in fighting the monsters. When you draw a friend, set it aside. Draw two additional cards, then determine the encounter as normal. The friend appears in the room with the other creatures, but it is a good creature and it fights on the side of the characters. (Either the DM or the players can control its actions.) After the fight, the grateful friend heads for the surface without expecting a share of the treasure. Various good characters and creatures can count as friends. A friend’s CR should be one or two lower than the dungeon level. A devious DM might put both a friendly dwarf and an evil enemy dwarf in his dungeon deck so that the players can’t tell at the start of the fight whether the dwarf they’ve met is a friend or enemy. Lurker: A sneaky, wandering opportunist has found the adventurers and attacks them while they’re fighting other creatures.

When you draw a lurker card, set it aside for a moment. Determine the encounter as normal using the remaining cards. The lurker appears on the battle grid outside the room, attacking the party from behind or from the side. If there’s more than one direction the lurker could come from, determine the direction randomly. Place it on the board as far away in that direction as it could be and still be in line of sight. Usually it will appear around a corner or at the far side of a door. If you have long, unobstructed lines of sight on your board, assume that the dungeon is gloomy and that the lurker appears 60 feet away from a character with darkvision or low-light vision, or 30 feet away from a character with normal vision. A lurker with ranks in the Hide skill starts the combat hiding, if it has cover. A harsh DM might decide where the lurker is but keep it off the board until it comes out into the open or a character makes a Listen or Spot check to notice it. Rogues and vermin are typical lurkers. In dungeons with tough lurkers, parties may find that it pays to place lookouts at corners in the rear to keep lurkers at a distance. Pet: The trials of dungeon life have forced this creature to team up with dissimilar creatures. When you draw a pet card, set it aside for a moment. Determine the encounter as normal using the remaining cards. The pet appears in the room with the other creatures and fights on their side. A pet might be a monster of some sort that has been trained by other dungeon denizens, or an evil warrior whose band has been defeated and who looks to the other creatures for safety. Because it adds to the danger of the encounter, a pet should

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:18 PM Page 167

CHAPTER 7:

You can add special cards in the deck, to further randomize the nature of encounters or to introduce new elements such as traps. Some special cards affect the way the game is played, so you’ll need to alter the basic rules when you incorporate them. Such modifications are discussed in the card descriptions. In general, the following card descriptions assume that you are using wandering monsters to add a sense of time pressure (see Wandering Monsters). If you are not using that rule, some special cards (such as Lock and Key) do not add much to the game. In general, the number of special cards you add should be roughly one-quarter of the total number of stat cards in the deck. In other words, a typical dungeon deck, made with twenty or so stat cards, should include around five special cards. Draw +1: The adventurers have delved deeper into the dungeon, where the encounters are more deadly. Discard this card and draw two more. Don’t shuffle this card back into the deck. In addition, draw one extra card for each encounter for the rest of the delve.

Illus. by S. Tappin

SPECIAL CARDS

If you use this option, it’s best to include three Draw +1 cards in your deck. Ideally, you would draw two Draw +1 cards over the course of the game; if you draw more or fewer, the dungeon can become unbalanced. (If you like to create larger dungeon decks, with more than twenty or so stat cards, include four or five Draw +1 cards.) When you start the dungeon, draw only three cards per encounter. As play progresses and Draw +1 cards come into effect, you’ll be drawing four or five cards per encounter. Draw +1 cards give the delve a sense of progress: Early encounters are easier, and later encounters are tougher. Statues (see below) are also more likely to be found deeper in the dungeon (because you’re drawing more cards per encounter later in the delve). Draw Two: The adventurers have stumbled into an important room in the dungeon. Discard this card and draw two more. Don’t shuffle this card back into the deck. For more fun, you can include a Draw Three card or even a Draw Four card. Lock and Key: The adventurers find a locked door and a key to that door, not necessarily in that order. This option uses two cards: a Lock card and a Key card. When you draw a Lock card or a Key card, set it aside. Draw an additional card to replace it, then determine the encounter as normal. (If you draw both cards, set aside only the first one drawn. Shuffle the other back into the deck and draw a card to replace it.) After the encounter is complete, the characters find the lock or key. The Lock card represents the Worg location of a locked secret door, one too tricky to pick. Leave a marker in that room on the map; when the characters find the key they can return to open the lock. The Key card is the key to that lock. If the characters find it, they can take it with them, either returning to the site of the lock (if they’ve already located it) or keeping it with them until they find the lock. When the party opens the lock, they find a big treasure (roll three times on Table 7–2: Random Dungeon Treasure). Statue: The adventurers have found a magic statue dedicated to one of the gods. The statue grants magical aid to the creatures in the room, making them tougher. However, once the creatures are defeated, the characters gain the benefit of the statue, which helps them out for the rest of the delve. For each Statue card you include in your deck, pick the deity to which it is dedicated: Hextor (the statue grants +1 on attacks per 3 dungeon levels), Heironeous (+1 to AC), Erythnul (+1d6 damage per 3 dungeon levels), Pelor (+5 hit points per dungeon level), or Boccob (regain used spells). When you draw a Statue card, set it aside. Draw an additional card to replace it, then determine the encounter as normal. (If you draw two or more Statue cards, set aside only the first one drawn. Shuffle the other back into the deck and draw a card to replace it.) The effect specified on the card applies to the creatures in the room (not including enemies, lurkers, or friends). Obviously, the Boccob statue doesn’t help the monsters much. Once the characters defeat the monsters, they gain the magical effect for the rest of the delve. Bonuses

RANDOM DUNGEONS

have a CR at least a few steps lower than the dungeon level. Even a really weak creature can have some role in an encounter if it’s teamed with more powerful creatures. (The “pet” role may merely be comic relief, but it is a way to stick a kobold into a 7th-level dungeon.) Twin: A pair of creatures (not necessarily the same kind) inhabits the dungeon. They are never seen apart from each other. If you draw a single twin card, set it aside. Determine the encounter as normal using the remaining cards. After determining the encounter, shuffle the twin card back into the deck. If you draw both twins, and they form the most challenging encounter you can make, the two twins are the encounter. The twins could be a mated pair of displacer beasts, or an evil cleric with her pet hell hound. Because twin encounters are likely to appear at the end of the delve (when the deck is thin and it’s more likely that you draw both twins), they should make for a climactic battle. Each twin should have a CR about equal to the dungeon’s level. Multiples: The adventurers have run into a large number of creatures. (Hopefully, they aren’t the most powerful creatures in the deck.) You can designate a creature card as “×2,” “×3,” or “×4.” This means that the card actually represents two, three, or four of those creatures. This method lets you have encounters with weak creatures such as kobolds without jamming your dungeon deck full of them. Of course, you can go as high as you want, but if it takes more than twelve of a monster to meet the Encounter Level you’re looking for, chances are it’s not a very interesting monster to throw at the party. (Refer to Table 4–1: Challenge Ratings and Encounter Levels for details on combining creatures and determining their Encounter Level.) A creature designated as multiple could also have any of the other special encounter types. For example, it could also be a twin (see above). An Orc Warrior card designated “×4” could be the twin of a Cleric of Gruumsh card, representing four orcs who are dedicated bodyguards for their leader.

167

RANDOM DUNGEONS

CHAPTER 7:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:18 PM Page 168

gained from statues stack with similar bonuses from other features of the dungeon. The statues’ magical effects help the PCs keep moving through the dungeon. Typically, adventurers run low on hit points and spells. In such a case, statues give them the boost they need to fight on. You can also use statues as a victory condition. For instance, if you include four Statue cards in the deck, the victory condition for the delve might be to find three of them. Trap: The door the party has opened was trapped. When you draw a Trap card, add it to the encounter. It represents a trap on the door that the party opened. The trap sets off an explosive that deals 1d6 points of fire damage per dungeon level to the character who sprang the trap (Reflex save DC 15 + dungeon level for half damage). Determine the rest of the encounter normally. A character may be able to find and disable the trap ahead of time. The DC for Search and Disable Device checks is 20 + dungeon level. If the dungeon has wandering monsters, let characters search for traps as much as they like. To be nice and keep the game moving, let a character search a door as a full-round action. If the character finds a trap, he or she can also try to disable it. Again, allow the character a Disable Device check as a full-round action. (Remember that a check that fails by 5 or more springs the trap, dealing damage to that character.) If the dungeon doesn’t have wandering monsters, let one character make one Search check to find traps at each door. If a character finds a trap, let him or her make as many Disable Device checks as he or she wants. If a character searches for traps and gets a high enough result to find one, you’ll have to draw cards for the next encounter to see whether there’s a trap or not.

Creature Habits To make the creatures in a random dungeon more distinct and to make running them easier, you can assign various habits to different creatures. A habit is a rule of behavior the creature tends to follow. Often, a habit means that a creature prefers to attack one character over another. In such a case, the creature will give up a flanking situation to attack a preferred character, but it won’t willingly provoke an attack of opportunity or give up the chance to attack. If the creature has a ranged attack, it won’t shoot at a preferred target with cover or a target that’s in melee if another target is clear. It might maneuver, one 5-foot step at a time, toward its preferred foe, but it won’t race willy-nilly past other enemies to get to the one that it wants to attack. You can assign habits as you see fit, giving them to all creatures, some creatures, or none. You can mark the stat cards to indicate their habits, or you can simply generalize the habits

(such as “all goblinoids are greedy and all reptilians are bloodthirsty”) and keep track of them in your head. You can even assign habits on the fly, as each encounter unfolds. Bloodthirsty: A creature with this habit has a learned or instinctive sense for an enemy’s weakness, and it tries to strike at a party’s weak link. A bloodthirsty creature prefers to attack the character with the fewest hit points. This habit can be a killer because it concentrates attacks on the most vulnerable party members. Give this habit to bloodsucking monsters or black-hearted fiends. Distracted: Creatures with this habit are a little thick, and canny adventurers can easily draw their attention from one combatant to another. The players, rather than the DM, decide which character each distracted creature attacks. This habit weakens the creatures by letting the players parcel out the distracted creatures’ attacks as they please. Give this habit to stupid creatures and creatures that would otherwise be really scary, such as monstrous spiders or orcs. Greedy: A creature with this habit would rather make off with loot than fight. If a character gives a greedy creature some loot, it retreats instead of pressing the fight. The amount of loot it takes to bribe a greedy creature is related to the creature’s CR; see the table below. The characters can bribe the creature with cash or with items of equivalent or greater value. It’s a full-round action to prepare a bribe and toss it to a greedy creature. (Some players might try to cheat, perhaps by tossing a bag of copper pieces instead of gold pieces. DMs facing this problem can counter it by cheating in turn, perhaps by having greedy creatures attack even after receiving a bribe.) Give this habit to rogues and mercenaries. It is most meaningful in campaign games, where giving a bribe to a creature has a lasting cost to the party. CR Bribe Value 1/4 25 gp 1/2 50 gp 1 100 gp 2 200 gp 3 300 gp 4 400 gp 5 600 gp 6 800 gp 7 1,200 gp 8 1,600 gp 9 2,400 gp 10 3,200 gp 11+ (CR –2) × 2* *Example: CR 11 = CR 9 (2,400 gp) × 2 = 4,800 gp.

pqqqqrs WHY HABITS? In general, you know how to run monsters. They attack characters with reasonable tactics but not, generally, with insightful strategy. They’re smart enough to attack when they have the chance, to avoid attacks of opportunity when they can, and to use 5-foot steps to set up flanking situations. They ignore dying characters unless they’ve seen someone healed back up to rejoin the fight. They’re generally not smart enough to circle around and get to a spellcaster if doing so means giving up the chance to attack. They don’t pull fancy stunts (such as readying an

attack against a character and waiting for another creature to flank the character before making that attack). Monsters tend to strike out at characters who are threatening them even when it would be smarter to concentrate their attacks on one or two characters. Perhaps you run your creatures dumber or smarter than that. Either way, assigning habits gives creatures a variety of tactics and goals, forcing the characters to take different approaches themselves. Habits also tell the DM what the creature will do, saving him or her a little mental effort.

pqqqqrs

168

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:18 PM Page 169

You may want to give your players a sense of progress, allowing your dungeon to change over time as the adventurers move deeper into it. To do so, you start with one deck, and as the game progresses you add in cards from a second, harder deck. To use this option, you’ll need to create two dungeon decks, the second having more powerful creatures than the first. Whenever cards are removed from the first dungeon deck (because the party has defeated monsters, sprung traps, or found statues), replace those cards with an equal number of random cards from the second deck. As the delve continues, the deck from which

THE MAP

To run a random dungeon, you need a map of some kind. The features of the map partially determine the way the dungeon runs, so it’s worth some thought. Draw the floorplan on an erasable battle grid, either drawing out the rooms as the characters explore or simply starting with the entire map visible. The dungeon battle grid in the Dungeon Master’s Guide makes a fine map for a random dungeon. Place doors randomly as you go, or as you see fit beforehand. Most doors should be 10-foot-wide double doors so that characters and creatures can move through them easily. If you’re designing a map or looking for one to use, try to find or design one that has wide corridors, ample doorways (or double doorways), and big rooms. You want room for plenty of creatures and characters to move around, and for big creatures.

CHAPTER 7:

EVOLVING THE DUNGEON DECK

you are drawing cards becomes tougher and tougher. This process represents the party delving deeper into the dungeon. Try giving the two decks different themes. Maybe the first deck is mostly vermin and beasts, while the second deck is made up of evil clerics, their undead creatures, and their humanoid guards. In this example, the party would start out encountering miscellaneous dungeon denizens but soon start finding members of the evil temple they’re out to destroy. If you use the Boss option (see Special Encounter Types, above), leave the boss’s card out of the deck until the characters defeat one or more creatures from the second deck. At that point, shuffle the boss into the second deck.

RANDOM DUNGEONS

Hateful: A creature with this habit has hatred for members of a common race or character class and will go out of its way to attack a member of such a race or class. It prefers to strike at an enemy of the designated race or class, if any are in the party. Goblins often hate dwarves, kobolds have it in for gnomes, and orcs sometimes hate elves. Intelligent undead hate good clerics and paladins. A barbarian who hates spellcasters would be pretty scary. Mindless: Creatures with this habit attack without even the slightest hint of tactics. Mindless creatures advance to the nearest characters and attack. They do not maneuver to gain flanking situations or even to avoid them. They generally avoid attacks of opportunity, but only because once they’re next to enemies, they stop and attack. In each round, a mindless creature attacks a random adjacent character. This habit makes creatures weaker. Give it to unintelligent undead.

pqqqqrs SAMPLE DUNGEON DECKS

A 2ND-LEVEL DUNGEON

Two sample dungeon decks, complete with special cards, defined groups, special encounter types, and creature habits, are provided here.

The party’s goal with this deck is to find three of the four magic statues. This 2nd-level dungeon deck is about right for a one-shot dungeon and a bit tough for a campaign. It’s also set up so that you can gradually add cards from it to the 1st-level dungeon deck, either during a delve or between delves in a campaign.

A 1ST-LEVEL DUNGEON The party’s goal with this deck is to find three of the four magic statues. This 1st-level dungeon deck is about right for a one-shot dungeon and a bit tough for a campaign. # Creature/Card CR Group 1 Man-at-Arms (friend) — — 1 Human Thug (lurker) 1 — 1 Goblin Sneak (lurker) 1 — 4 Human Bandit 1/2 Bandit 1 Gnoll 1 Gnoll 1 Hyena 1 Gnoll 2 Orc Warrior 1/2 Orc 1 Orc Berserker 1 Orc 3 Kobold Warrior 1/4 Reptilian 1 Kobold Warrior (×2) 1/2 Reptilian 1 Lizardfolk 1 Reptilian 4 Skeleton 1/3 Undead 1 Draw Two 1 Statue of Boccob (regain all spells) 1 Statue of Heironeous (+1 to AC) 1 Statue of Hextor (+1 on attacks) 1 Statue of Pelor (+5 hp) 26 total cards

Habit — Greedy (100 gp) Hates dwarves — — — Distracted — Hates gnomes Hates gnomes — Mindless

# Creature/Card CR Group 1 Gnome Recruit (friend) — — 1 Drow Archer (lurker) 3 — 1 Hell Hound 3 — 1 Human Thug (lurker) 1 — 1 Werewolf 3 — 1 Worg 2 — 2 Gnoll 1 Gnoll 2 Hyena 1 Gnoll 1 Half-Orc Fighter 2 Orc 1 Orc Spearfighter 2 Orc 1 Orc Warrior 1/2 Orc 1 Orc Warrior (×2) 1 Orc 1 Kobold Warrior (×3) 1 Reptilian 4 Lizardfolk 1 Reptilian 2 Ghoul 1 Undead 2 Skeleton 1/3 Undead 1 Troglodyte Zombie 1 Undead 1 Draw Three 1 Statue of Boccob (regain all spells) 1 Statue of Heironeous (+1 to AC) 1 Statue of Hextor (+1 on attacks) 1 Statue of Pelor (+10 hp) 29 total cards

Habit — Hates elves — Greedy (100 gp) — — — — Hates elves Hates elves Distracted Distracted Hates gnomes — Bloodthirsty Mindless Mindless

pqqqqrs

169

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:18 PM Page 170

RANDOM DUNGEONS Illus. by R. Wright

CHAPTER 7:

ROOM FEATURES To spice up the game, give rooms special features. These give the floor plan a kind of geography. Some ideas for features include the following. Attack +1: All creatures in this room receive a +1 bonus on their attack rolls. Blessed Room: In a blessed room, all saving throws automatically succeed. (This is where characters should want to fight ghouls, if they can manage it.) Cursed Room: In this room, all saving throws automatically fail. It’s a bad room for spellcasters. Damage +1: All creatures in this room receive a +1 bonus on their damage rolls (including spell damage). Draw +1: Draw an extra card when determining the encounter in this room. (Use this feature in a large or central room.) Evil Attack +1: Evil creatures in this room receive a +1 bonus on their attack rolls. Extra Creature Chance: After determining the encounter for this room, draw an extra card. If it’s not a creature, ignore it. (Shuffle it back into the deck.) If it is a creature, add it to the encounter. Extra Statue Chance: After determining the encounter for this room, draw an extra card. If it’s not a Statue card, ignore it. (Shuffle it back into the deck.) Obviously, if you aren’t including Statue cards in your deck, this feature is meaningless. Fog: This room is filled with fog, as if a fog cloud spell had been cast within it. This feature hurts ranged attacks and sneak attacks. Good Attack +1: Good creatures in this room receive a +1 bonus on their attack rolls. Pain: In this room, all threats are automatic critical hits. Rubble, Pillars, Pits: This room contains obstacles that make it harder to move through. Be careful not to make the room too small, or it will be hard for creatures and characters to maneuver. Wall of Darkness: An opaque wall of darkness cuts across this room, blocking line of sight. The wall of darkness prevents charges across it, makes ranged attacks impossible, and conceals creatures and characters on one side from those on the opposite side.

CHARACTERS

Players can bring just about any characters into a random dungeon. You’ll find plenty of good-aligned miniatures that work as adventurers. There’s no reason you can’t play unusual creatures, such as a tiefling captain, a crested felldrake, or a displacer beast. Use a creature’s CR as the rough equivalent of a PC’s level. Or you can create characters especially for the random dungeon. These short-lived PCs might be opportunities for you to try out new character types—maybe a spiked chain fighter, a cleric/wizard, or a character of an

unusual race. Create the character just like you would for any other D&D game. Finally, you can use characters from your regular D&D campaign, though the random delves probably shouldn’t be part of your usual campaign. A random dungeon can be too harsh a place for a character that you hope to play for a long time. For this reason, your character neither permanently suffers the consequences nor permanently gains the rewards of the delve. That said, running characters through a combat gauntlet like a random dungeon is a good way to practice tactics.

PARTY SIZE If the party is larger or smaller than four characters, scale the delve accordingly. The rule that you draw four cards for each encounter is based on an average of four PCs. If there are three PCs, draw only two cards per encounter. If there are five or six PCs, draw six or more cards. If that adjustment doesn’t seem to create an appropriate challenge, send the party through a higher- or lower-level dungeon. A dungeon that is one level lower than the average party level is usually fine for a three-character party. A dungeon one level higher than the party level is usually good for five or six characters.

LIMITED-USE ITEMS In a one-shot adventure, when it doesn’t matter whether you use up your items, one-use and charged items are a lot more valuable than they are in a regular campaign. Therefore, if you’re playing a one-shot random dungeon, one-use items such as potions and scrolls cost five times their normal price. Charged items such as wands cost their normal price, but have onefifth the normal number of charges. This “five times” rule balances the one-use and charged items so they don’t dominate the random dungeon. For example, if you’re creating a 5th-level character for a one-shot dungeon, you’d start with 9,000 gp worth of gear (typical for a 5th-level PC, according to the Dungeon Master’s Guide). If you want a potion of cure light wounds, however, it will cost you 250 gp instead of 50 gp. If you’re bringing an existing character into a one-shot dungeon, trade in your existing one-shot items for replacement oneshot items at five times the cost. For items with charges, give them one-fifth as many charges as normal. In a random dungeon campaign, normal rules apply. Mind Flayer

pqqqqrs SCALING THE DUNGEON You can make a dungeon easier or harder by drawing fewer or more cards per encounter. However, drawing fewer or more cards has less effect than you might think. It changes the average number of creatures in an encounter, but the party still has to fight through the same

number of creatures to meet its objective. It’s easier to take on creatures in smaller clumps, but having to fight more encounters partly makes up for that. The reverse is true about fighting a smaller number of larger encounters.

pqqqqrs

170

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:30 PM Page 171

HOW TO WIN

INITIATIVE Initiative in a random dungeon is usually handled just like in the standard D&D rules. Make initiative checks normally when the party opens a door. When the fight is over, initiative no longer applies until the party opens the next door. This system works fine if you don’t have wandering monsters (or other factors producing time pressure). If you include wandering monsters or you want to change the pace of the delve a bit, you have a couple of other options. Ongoing Initiative: If you have wandering monsters between fights, the characters are going to be scrambling through the dungeon trying to get to the next encounter before more monsters show up. Whenever monsters appear on the battle grid, reroll for initiative. Taking 10: A faster method is to have everyone take 10 on initiative. The players will always act in the same order, because their initiative modifiers don’t change. The only change to the initiative order is where the monsters fit into it. You can have the monsters also take 10, or roll for them to allow some randomness without creating a lot of work or taking a lot of time. Wandering Monsters and Initiative: A wandering monster that shows up when a battle is not underway simply acts in initiative order (just as if the characters were opening a dungeon door). A wandering monster joining a battle that’s underway goes first in the initiative order. (That’s the standard rule for a creature joining a battle that it’s aware of; see page 24 of the Dungeon Master’s Guide for more details.) However, since it may be easier for the DM to have all the monsters go at once, for

An encounter generally begins when the door to a new room is opened. Except as noted under Special Delve Rules, below, encounters are played out using the standard D&D rules.

Treasure For simplicity and fun, treasure always takes the form of a random item. Use Table 7–1: Random Dungeon Treasure to determine what sort of item is found (mundane, minor, medium, or major), then randomly roll the item from the tables in the Dungeon Master’s Guide. If the result includes “×2” or “×3,” roll again once or twice, respectively. This process gives you a treasure suitable for a single encounter.

CHAPTER 7:

PLAYING THE DELVE

Once you have characters, a map, a dungeon deck, and a goal, you’re ready to play.

ENCOUNTERS

RANDOM DUNGEONS

Unlike a D&D roleplaying adventure, a random dungeon delve has a specific victory condition. Goals tend to be tough because a one-shot delve can be a lot more challenging than a single adventure in a long-term campaign. Determining a goal affects how you’re going to build your dungeon deck and what sort of map you want. Here are some possible goals. Defeat Monsters: The party wins if it can defeat monsters with a total CR equal to 8 × dungeon level. For example, in a 3rdlevel dungeon, the party wins when it defeats monsters with CRs totaling 24. This goal is scalable; you can make the delve harder or easier by adjusting the total CR necessary to win. Find Statues: If you use Statue cards, finding statues can be the goal of the delve. Typically, the characters must find all or most (perhaps three out of four in the deck) of the statues and defeat the monsters defending them. Kill the Boss: If you use the Boss option (see Special Encounter Types, above), defeating the boss can be the goal of the delve. The party wins when it finds and defeats this creature. This goal is a lot of fun because players love to have a climactic battle with a bad guy.

simplicity, a wandering monster joining a battle can act at the same point in the initiative order as the monsters that are already fighting. (In this case, don’t treat the wandering monster as flat-footed, even if it hasn’t acted yet.)

Table 7–1: Random Dungeon Treasure GP Level None Mundane Minor Medium Major Value* 1st 01–35 36–80 81–100 — — 360 2nd 01–20 21–30 31–100 — — 740 3rd 01–20 — 21–97 98–100 — 1,100 4th 01–20 — 21–93 94–100 — 1,400 5th 01–20 — 21–88 89–100 — 1,900 6th 01–20 — 21–83 84–100 — 2,300 7th 01–20 — 21–78 79–99 100 3,100 8th 01–20 — 21–71 71–98 99–100 4,000 9th 01–20 — 21–60 61–97 98–100 5,300 10th 01–20 — 21–46 47–96 97–100 6,900 11th 01–20 — 21–30 31–94 95–100 8,900 12th 01–20 — — 21–88 89–100 12,000 13th 01–20 — — 21–75 76–100 16,000 14th 01–20 — — 21–60 61–100 20,000 15th 01–20 — — 21–40 41–100 26,000 16th 01–55 — — — 56–100 ×2 36,000 17th 01–65 — — — 66–100 ×3 42,000 18th 01–55 — — — 56–100 ×3 54,000 19th 01–40 — — — 41–100 ×3 72,000 20th 01–20 — — — 21–100 ×3 96,000 *The approximate average gold piece value of treasure for the given level.

SPECIAL DELVE RULES While a random delve is meant to be simple and fast, many DMs like to add detail to their dungeons. These options allow you to tailor the delve experience. Keep your first delve simple so you can get a feel for the rhythm of a random delve. Then you can add special rules to customize the experience.

Doors Doors normally open easily and stay open from then on—but you can get more detailed if you like. In general, additional detail

pqqqqrs PLAYERS AND SECRET INFORMATION When playing a random dungeon, it’s reasonable to let players have information that their characters wouldn’t have, even down to the monsters’ statistics and the floorplan of the dungeon. (You don’t have to reveal this information, but it’s okay to do so.) A random dungeon

delve is more like a board game and less a simulation of adventure in a fantastic world. If players use information to make smart decisions, that makes the game more fun. So when you’re running a random delve, don’t feel obliged to run it with the same secrecy that you’d use when running a regular D&D adventure.

pqqqqrs

171

RANDOM DUNGEONS

CHAPTER 7:

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:30 PM Page 172

adds to the game only if you include wandering monsters or some other form of time pressure. Opening a door usually means starting an encounter. Any character next to a door has the option of opening it as a move action. If there are no monsters in play when the door is opened, reroll for initiative. If there are monsters in play, the initiative count just keeps going. Listening: If a character at a closed door succeeds on a Listen check (DC 20 + dungeon level), the DM shows the characters what creatures are in the room before the door is opened. Each attempt is a standard action, and you can listen at a door only if you’re directly in front of it. DMs who hunger for a touch of realism can adjust the Listen DC depending on what’s actually in the room. If the dungeon has wandering monsters (see below), characters can listen at doors all they want to. If the dungeon doesn’t have wandering monsters or some other form of time pressure, one character may make a single Listen check at a particular door. Locked Doors: Some or all doors may be locked, though this detail is really interesting only if you’re using wandering monsters or some other form of time pressure. The DC to open a lock is 20 + dungeon level; the DC to force open a door is 12 + dungeon level. Each attempt is a standard action, and you can open a lock or force open a door only if you’re directly in front of it. If the characters attempt to force a door, the noise may attract dungeon denizens—the DM rolls twice for wandering monsters at the end of the round. Secret Doors: If the dungeon has some form of time pressure, some of the doors can be secret doors (Search DC 20 + dungeon level to locate). The players know where they are, but the PCs still have to search for the opening mechanism. Secret doors should usually lead to rooms with treasure or other goodies so that the characters have a reason to spend time trying to open them. One-Way Doors: Some doors shut behind the party and won’t open again. One-way doors are interesting only if there’s no easy way around them (although there has to be some way out, of course). One-way doors may increase tension as the party realizes there’s no turning back.

Light To keep the game simple, ignore the question of light—assume that the whole dungeon is illuminated well enough for combatants to see and fight. Forcing the party to provide light, however, adds an extra tactical consideration to the delve. Whether to worry about light sources is up to the DM. The more monsters there are with darkvision and ranged attacks, the more fun it is to have the characters walking around in a pool of light, making targets of themselves.

Wandering Monsters

172

The point of wandering monsters is to create time pressure, forcing the characters to keep moving. If you find that players draw out fights by facing monsters in doorways rather than pressing into the rooms, or if you want to introduce options that take up time (listening at doors, for instance), use wandering monsters. You may want to create a separate deck for these (see below). Wandering monsters don’t count toward the total CR for purposes of determining victory. They also don’t have treasure. If you don’t make a separate wandering monsters deck, reshuffle a card representing a wandering monster back into the deck once the creature has been defeated.

Once you’re familiar and comfortable with how wandering monsters work, you can add your own touches of realism or tactics. Perhaps certain monsters have the ability to call for help, inviting a greater chance for the appearance of additional wandering monsters. Or perhaps your dungeon involves creatures at war with one another, and the appearance of some wandering monsters may create a truly confused melee as creatures attack one another as well as the PCs. Generating Wandering Monsters: At the end of each round, roll d%. There is a 20% chance of a wandering monster appearing. If the dice indicate that one appears, draw a card. You can use a separate wandering monster deck (see below) or simply draw a card out of the standard dungeon deck. If you draw a creature, it appears outside the party’s current room, ready to attack the party from behind or from the side. If there’s more than one direction a wandering monster could come from, determine the direction randomly. Place it on the battle grid as far away in that direction as it could be and still be in line of sight. Usually it will appear around a corner or at the far side of a door. If you draw something other than a creature (such as a special card), ignore it. (Shuffle it back into the deck.) Do not draw again. No wandering monster appears. Wandering Monster Deck: You can create a separate wandering monster deck, drawing from it instead of from the normal dungeon deck when a wandering monster appears. Wandering monsters may be of a different sort from the monsters found in the dungeon deck. Maybe they’re scavengers and ghouls attracted to the sound of combat. If you use a separate deck, you can include special encounter types such as Friend or ×3, or special cards such as Draw +1 or Trap (in which case the PCs trigger a trap they didn’t know was there).

PLAYING WITHOUT A DM It’s possible to play a random delve without a DM. To do so, the players must agree to certain rules ahead of time. One player must construct a dungeon deck normally, but instead of serving as DM, that player runs a character like everyone else. As play proceeds, certain issues will arise that the players need to be aware of and ready to resolve. Monster Starting Locations: When an encounter begins, the monsters start in the middle of the room, each as close to the middle as possible. Alternatively, when you create the map you can specify certain squares as “monster starting squares.” When you draw the encounter cards, place the monsters in those squares, or as close to them as possible (if there are more monsters than designated squares). This option works best in rooms with unusual shapes or features. Monster Target Choice: The more habits you apply to monsters, the easier it is to decide who the monsters attack. In general, have monsters spread their attacks out evenly among the PCs that they can attack. When a monster has to choose between two targets that are already being attacked evenly, it attacks the closest one. If it’s still a tie, roll randomly.

pqs USING MINIATURES STATISTICS If you want to make a delve run even faster than normal, use the miniatures statistics instead of the roleplaying statistics on stat cards. If you can’t bear to give up rolling for damage, substitute 1d8 for each 5 points of damage the creature normally deals.

pqs

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:30 PM Page 173

Half-Orc Fighter

they’ve conquered a delve and can turn back. Typically, the XP award for a delve is equal to that awarded for defeating a monster whose CR is equal to the dungeon level + 6. For example, after conquering a 3rd-level dungeon, the party receives XP equal to what they would get for defeating a CR 9 monster (see Table 2–6, page 38 of the Dungeon Master’s Guide). For instance, if the PCs in this case are 3rd level, they gain 7,200 XP.

TREASURE

In a one-shot dungeon, the idea of introducing new characters or replacing a dead one is irrelevant. The players can simply choose the characters they want each time, because there’s no continuity between one delve and the next. In a random dungeon campaign, however, you’ll need to have a policy for bringing in new characters (including replacing dead ones). The easiest policy is simply that the new character starts at the same place the original character did in terms of level and wealth.

CHAPTER 7:

NEW CHARACTERS

RANDOM DUNGEONS

In a campaign game, PCs can sell treasure between delves and use the cash to purchase other items. Characters may want to keep some cash on hand to buy off greedy creatures.

DUNGEON ADVANCEMENT

RANDOM DUNGEON CAMPAIGNS

A random dungeon works great for one-shot games. You can also set it up as a campaign in its own right. Just as in a regular D&D campaign, the characters find treasure, accumulate experience points, and grow in power over time. A random dungeon campaign is deadlier than a standard D&D campaign, but characters that survive progress faster. Running a random dungeon as a campaign means that you’ll have to consider a few factors that don’t matter in a one-shot game.

DANGER LEVEL In a game of chess, you are happy to win even if most of your pieces have been captured. A one-shot dungeon is pretty much the same way. Even if half the party is killed, a win is still a win. With a campaign, however, there’s little point if the death rate is so high that characters never have a chance to get ahead. Compared to a one-shot dungeon, a campaign should have a lower danger level and thus a slower character death rate. You can manipulate the danger level in all the usual ways: the object of the delve, the power level of the monsters, how many monsters there are, what fighting habits the monsters have, and the frequency and power of wandering monsters.

EXPERIENCE You can assign experience points normally during a random dungeon campaign. Another option, however, is to have a victory condition and grant XP only if the characters succeed in the delve—that way the players will have a clear sense of when

Illus. by S. Tappin

Rolls for Monsters: One player could be designated to make rolls for the monsters. Or, each player could roll for monsters that attack his or her character. Or, anyone whose character dies takes over the role. Any of these systems is acceptable— whatever works best for your group!

Instead of running the same set of creatures over and over, you can set your dungeon up to grow more powerful over time. For such a campaign, you start with two decks, the second more powerful than the first. During a delve, you treat the dungeon deck normally. Between delves, however, remove out about one-fourth or one-fifth of the first deck and replace those cards with the same number of random cards from the second deck. (You might want to have only monster cards in the second deck and take only monster cards out of the first deck. That way you don’t wind up with a dungeon deck that has few or no Statue cards.) Theoretically, you could have a large number of decks, from 1st level on up. At the end of every delve, you remove cards from the deck and replace each with a card from the deck “one level up.” For example, the 1st-level deck will soon be half-filled with cards from your 2nd-level deck. At the end of the delve, the 1stand 2nd-level cards you remove get replaced by cards from the 2nd- and 3rd-level decks, respectively. For a campaign with multiple decks, you might want to use alignment as a criterion for groups. Alignments work well in groups because you’re likely to find creatures from one deck whose alignments match those of creatures from other decks. More specific groups, such as “goblinoids,” might not carry over well from one level to another unless you ensure that there are plenty of these creatures in every deck. For a campaign based in a dungeon that grows in power, you can set an overall victory condition, such as “find ten statues.” If the characters forge ahead on their delves and find plenty of statues each time, they’ll win before the dungeon gets too tough. But if they’re cautious and retreat after finding one or two statues on each delve, the dungeon will soon become too powerful for them and they’ll eventually be defeated. A race against a dungeon that’s growing in power also works even if there’s no fixed victory condition for the campaign. As the characters gain experience and magic items, they’ll become more powerful. If they can grow in power faster than the dungeon does, they’ll stay on top. If they fall behind, the dungeon gets tougher faster than they do, and eventually they face defeat.

173

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:31 PM Page 174

EXIT IT EX ER

RN

CO

EXIT

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

Assembly Tile

EXIT EXIT

Assembly Tile with Difficult Terrain Exit: When your creatures rout, they move off the battle grid from exit squares on your assembly tile, if they can. Exit Corner: When your creatures rout, they move at double speed toward the exit corner on your assembly tile. Difficult Terrain: It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing difficult terrain (3 squares if moving diagonally). Wall: Walls block movement, line of sight, and line of effect. A creature can’t move diagonally past a corner or end of a wall. Count around walls to see if a commander is close enough to influence the creatures in its warband.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:31 PM Page 175

front attack +2, +2 AC

Formed Unit

Morale +2 per rank Must have one full rank or become unformed Half speed forward Quarter speed backward Attack +2 and double attacks against lone creatures

side attack –2, – –2 AC

Unformed Unit Medium Creatures No facing No minimum number of creatures No movement restrictions No morale bonus Up to six ranged attacks

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

rear attack –4, – –4 AC

side attack –2, –2 AC

Medium Creatures

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:32 PM Page 176

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

EXIT

EX

IT

CO

RN

ER

EXIT

EXIT

Assembly Tile

EXIT

Assembly Tile with Statue Exit: When your creatures rout, they move off the battle grid from exit squares on your assembly tile, if they can. Exit Corner: When your creatures rout, they move at double speed toward the exit corner on your assembly tile. Statue: It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing a statue (3 squares if moving diagonally). A creature can’t end its movement in a square containing a statue. A statue provides cover to creatures behind it but does not block line of sight. Wall: Walls block movement, line of sight, and line of effect. A creature can’t move diagonally past a corner or end of a wall. Count around walls to see if a commander is close enough to influence the creatures in its warband.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:32 PM Page 177

front attack +2, +2 AC

Large Creatures

Morale +2 per rank Must have one full rank or become unformed Half speed forward Quarter speed backward Attack +2 and double attacks against lone creatures

side attack –2, –2 AC

Unformed Unit Large Creatures

No facing No minimum number of creatures No movement restrictions No morale bonus Up to two ranged attacks

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

rear attack –4, –4 AC

side attack –2, –2 AC

Formed Unit

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:33 PM Page 178

Blood Rock:19 –20 critical hit in melee

© 2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

Abattoir

Abattoir Blood Rock: Any creature on the blood rock terrain scores a critical hit when its melee attack roll is a natural 19 or 20. The attack automatically hits no matter how high the defender’s AC, even if the defender is immune to double damage from critical hits. Ranged attacks are not affected by the blood rock terrain type. Wall: Walls block movement, line of sight, and line of effect. A creature can’t move diagonally past a corner or end of a wall. Count around walls to see if a commander is close enough to influence the creatures in its warband.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:33 PM Page 179

front attack +2, +2 AC

Formed Unit

attack –4, –4 AC

Unformed Unit Small Creatures No facing No minimum number of creatures No movement restrictions No morale bonus Up to eight ranged attacks

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

rear

attack–2,–2 AC

side

side

Morale +2 per rank Must have one full rank or become unformed Half speed forward Quarter speed backward Attack +2 and double attacks against lone creatures

attack –2, –2 AC

Small Creatures

Corridor

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:33 PM Page 180

Corridor Wall: Walls block movement, line of sight, and line of effect. A creature can’t move diagonally past a corner or end of a wall. Count around walls to see if a commander is close enough to influence the creatures in its warband.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:44 PM Page 181

Ruined Wall Mighty ruins from long ago rise from the grass.

High Wall: Impassable (blocks movement). Total Cover: Blocks line of sight and line of effect.

Briar Patch

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

This is a low thicket of tangled, thorny vines. Briars: Difficult terrain (movement costs doubled).

Rubble Room

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:45 PM Page 182

Rubble Room Difficult Terrain: It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing difficult terrain (3 squares if moving diagonally). Statue: It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing a statue (3 squares if moving diagonally). A creature can’t end its movement in a square containing a statue. A statue provides cover to creatures behind it but does not block line of sight. Wall: Walls block movement, line of sight, and line of effect. A creature can’t move diagonally past a corner or end of a wall. Count around walls to see if a commander is close enough to influence the creatures in its warband.

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:45 PM Page 183

Dragon Skull The power of an ancient dragon still lives in the very stones that surround its skull.

Skull: Impassable (blocks movement). Total Cover: Blocks line of sight and line of effect. Stony Ground: Any unit on the stony ground surrounding the skull scores a critical hit when its melee attack roll is a natural 19 or 20. The attack automatically hits no matter how high the defender’s AC, even if the defender is immune to double damage from critical hits. Ranged attacks are not affected.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:46 PM Page 184

Shrine

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

Sacred Circle: attack +2, magic damage

Shrine Sacred Circle: A creature on any square containing the sacred circle gains a +2 bonus on attack rolls. (Candles have no game effect.) Any damage it deals with these attacks is considered magic damage, which penetrates Damage Reduction. Sacred circles have no effect on movement. Wall: Walls block movement, line of sight, and line of effect. A creature can’t move diagonally past a corner or end of a wall. Count around walls to see if a commander is close enough to influence the creatures in its warband.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:46 PM Page 185

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

Statue Room

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:47 PM Page 186

Statue Room Statue: It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing a statue (3 squares if moving diagonally). A creature can’t end its movement in a square containing a statue. A statue provides cover to creatures behind it but does not block line of sight. Difficult Terrain: It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing difficult terrain (3 squares if moving diagonally). Wall: Walls block movement, line of sight, and line of effect. A creature can’t move diagonally past a corner or end of a wall. Count around walls to see if a commander is close enough to influence the creatures in its warband.

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:47 PM Page 187

Stand of Trees This stand of sparse trees is perhaps the gravesite of an ancient druid.

Briars: Difficult terrain (movement costs doubled). Partial Cover: Grants +4 AC against ranged attacks. An attacker can shoot out through 1 inch without granting cover to the defender.

Treasure Room

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:48 PM Page 188

Treasure Room Statue: It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing a statue (3 squares if moving diagonally). A creature can’t end its movement in a square containing a statue. A statue provides cover to creatures behind it but does not block line of sight. Difficult Terrain: It costs 2 squares to move into a square containing difficult terrain (3 squares if moving diagonally). Wall: Walls block movement, line of sight, and line of effect. A creature can’t move diagonally past a corner or end of a wall. Count around walls to see if a commander is close enough to influence the creatures in its warband.

Photocopy two templates, cut them out, and tape them together as shown.

Radius 4 Template (Skirmish) Use this template for spells such as fireball. The targeted creature must be in the central 4-square space.

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:48 PM Page 189

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:49 PM Page 190

no effect

no effect

Radius 2 Template (Skirmish)

cut out center (the effect does not reach the half-squares in the corners.)

no effect

no effect

2-Inch-Radius Template (Mass Battles)

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

Co n

eT em

pl

at

e1

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:49 PM Page 191

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

620_96582_MinisHndbk.qxd 8/19/03 3:50 PM Page 192

Cone Template 2

©2003 Wizards of the Coast, Inc. Permission granted to photocopy this page for personal use.

Miniatures Handbook - PDF Free Download (2024)
Top Articles
Latest Posts
Article information

Author: Foster Heidenreich CPA

Last Updated:

Views: 6374

Rating: 4.6 / 5 (76 voted)

Reviews: 83% of readers found this page helpful

Author information

Name: Foster Heidenreich CPA

Birthday: 1995-01-14

Address: 55021 Usha Garden, North Larisa, DE 19209

Phone: +6812240846623

Job: Corporate Healthcare Strategist

Hobby: Singing, Listening to music, Rafting, LARPing, Gardening, Quilting, Rappelling

Introduction: My name is Foster Heidenreich CPA, I am a delightful, quaint, glorious, quaint, faithful, enchanting, fine person who loves writing and wants to share my knowledge and understanding with you.